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US House Votes To Reform NSA Bulk Data Collection

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posted on May, 13 2015 @ 08:54 PM
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The House of Representatives voted to pass the USA Freedom Act on Wednesday, approving a bill that would change the way the National Security Agency gathers telephone data of American citizens. The bill now heads to the Senate.

The USA Freedom Act was passed overwhelmingly with 338 votes in favor and 88 against. Despite criticism that the legislation falls short of protecting Americans’ rights, the bill was approved without any amendments.


Why do I feel even if this bill had amendments it would not make much of a difference ?


Under the bill, the NSA would be prohibited from collecting telephone metadata under the Patriot Act. Instead, the agency would have to acquire a warrant every time it wanted to access phone records, which would be held by telephone companies. Officials would need to submit data requests via keywords in order to collect relevant data from companies.

The bill would also reform the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA Court) by setting up a five-person panel that would offer advise when intelligence agencies are seeking new interpretations of existing law. Some court rulings would need to be declassified.


We are just going to have to see how this plays out in the Senate .


However, privacy advocates have criticized the bill for not reining the NSA in further. The Freedom Act ends the NSA's bulk collection of telephone metadata, but it does not address the agency's online surveillance or other controversial programs.


So what do you think ATS is this a positive step against the Patriot act or a legal way to just continue the spying ?

Let's hear your thoughts
LINK

Kap

edit on 13-5-2015 by Kapusta because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 13 2015 @ 08:58 PM
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A good "first step"



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 09:18 PM
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a reply to: Kapusta

This is great news and a solid beginning!

I don't expect there to be any reduction in data collection but, this prevents the "lawful" use of data gathered for criminal prosecutions against ordinary citizens.

The DOJ has been creatively fabricating false sources for local enforcement though so this won't necessarily address that issue. Furthermore, many local and state agencies have access to the same data and collection methods so this will do nothing to restrain anybody else other than set a desirable precedent.




posted on May, 13 2015 @ 09:29 PM
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a reply to: Kapusta

I trust NO politician to represent the people's best interest. I am unconvinced this is genuine. Yes, cynical is my middle name.

What the left hand giveth , the right hand taketh away!



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 09:32 PM
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originally posted by: Ultralight
a reply to: Kapusta

I trust NO politician to represent the people's best interest. I am unconvinced this is genuine. Yes, cynical is my middle name.

What the left hand giveth , the right hand taketh away!



Do you have a better Idea ?



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 09:41 PM
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originally posted by: Kapusta

originally posted by: Ultralight
a reply to: Kapusta

I trust NO politician to represent the people's best interest. I am unconvinced this is genuine. Yes, cynical is my middle name.

What the left hand giveth , the right hand taketh away!



Do you have a better Idea ?


Occupy NSA!

On a serious note, I am right there with EFF and do not believe it goes far enough, but it is a good first step and doesn't dial it back too far where it would not have the votes.

I posted earlier where Senator Corker (R-TN) actually wants to give more powers to the NSA. *rolls eyes*

Will it be effective and prevent the NSA from gaining access to records, maybe, but I am cynical as well as the previous post in that I think another loophole, or even blackmail of judges and panel members might come into play.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 09:50 PM
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Why stop with the NSA?

Do you have any idea how many 'agencies' collect information on you? What about the NRO, the FBI ... the DoD? What about Walmart, or AT&T, or Apple or Microsoft?

This is an effort only to placate the unwashed masses.

It ALL needs to stop.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 09:54 PM
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originally posted by: Snarl
Why stop with the NSA?

Do you have any idea how many 'agencies' collect information on you? What about the NRO, the FBI ... the DoD? What about Walmart, or AT&T, or Apple or Microsoft?

This is an effort only to placate the unwashed masses.

It ALL needs to stop.

You are quite right Sir, quite right indeed.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 09:59 PM
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I love how politic rats are trying to show that they "care", with this one,

The bill would also reform the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA Court) by setting up a five-person panel that would offer advise when intelligence agencies are seeking new interpretations of existing law. Some court rulings would need to be declassified.

I am sure that our constitutional rights are very clear when it comes to rights to privacy and how the government will deal with it, but having a so call "panel" to interpret the law? pleasssseeee that is a joke people, a big joke, I am sure that their interpretation of laws will lean very much into what NSA and the very highly unconstitutional, FISA court wants, after all is all for the good of national security.

What a joke.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 10:11 PM
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a reply to: Kapusta

Like with all bills passed by congress, the devil's in the details. They can't write a clear black and white bill without it being littered with legalize and loop holes. Not to mention hundreds of pages thick. The bill will look like it's protecting Americans, but it will most likely have conditions written in the bill that will legally allow the government to continue their spying.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 10:11 PM
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originally posted by: marg6043
I love how politic rats are trying to show that they "care", with this one,

The bill would also reform the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA Court) by setting up a five-person panel that would offer advise when intelligence agencies are seeking new interpretations of existing law. Some court rulings would need to be declassified.

I am sure that our constitutional rights are very clear when it comes to rights to privacy and how the government will deal with it, but having a so call "panel" to interpret the law? pleasssseeee that is a joke people, a big joke, I am sure that their interpretation of laws will lean very much into what NSA and the very highly unconstitutional, FISA court wants, after all is all for the good of national security.

What a joke.



I agree with you !

I am glad to see Ran taking the necessary steps


t's unclear whether or not the bill has the support to make it through the Senate. Majority Leader Mitch McConnel (R-Ky.) has promoted the idea of simply extending the Patriot Act, but Senators Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Rand Paul (R-Ky.) have both threatened to filibuster any bill that doesn't reform the NSA in some way.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 10:45 PM
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originally posted by: Kapusta

Do you have a better Idea ?


I think mandatory jail time for any violations would be a good start.

So what if Congress makes something illegal for the NSA? They have already done illegal things, but no penalties are forthcoming. Why should the NSA care about the law when there are no consequences for breaking it?



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 11:07 PM
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a reply to: Kapusta

My problem with rands, and the other democrats, fight is that they deny this bill to keep things the same...

So why not take a piece of out and continue the fight of getting rid of it completely?

You can lose the battle without losing the war.
edit on thWed, 13 May 2015 23:09:09 -0500America/Chicago520150980 by Sremmos80 because: added other guy as well.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 11:44 PM
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originally posted by: Sremmos80
a reply to: Kapusta

My problem with rands, and the other democrats, fight is that they deny this bill to keep things the same...

So why not take a piece of out and continue the fight of getting rid of it completely?

You can lose the battle without losing the war.



Rand is a republican , He stated he will filibuster any bill that does not support a reform .

Since we know we can't get rid of the NSA ,reform is what is needed .

But , Ultimately we need to get rid of the Patriot act



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 11:48 PM
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a reply to: Kapusta

And the freedom act, which he is against, is reform is it not?



posted on May, 14 2015 @ 12:02 AM
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originally posted by: Sremmos80
a reply to: Kapusta

And the freedom act, which he is against, is reform is it not?



What I am saying is that this bill might not support reform within the NSA so I suspect that Rand will try and filibuster it , If it does more harm then good , then what good is the bill ?

I am sure Rand Has the good of the people in mind , Hes not one to support something that Violates our liberties.
The problem is that this bill extends the Patriot Act ,Something He's against .

essentially if the bill is passed then basically the NSA is given the green light to go ahead and spy on us without consequence really.

I wish I had more info on the bill .
edit on 14-5-2015 by Kapusta because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-5-2015 by Kapusta because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-5-2015 by Kapusta because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-5-2015 by Kapusta because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 14 2015 @ 12:08 AM
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a reply to: Kapusta

You have much more trust in Rand then I do, not sure the old man rubbed off on him entirely.

But am willing to admit I have some details of this bill wrong.



posted on May, 14 2015 @ 12:25 AM
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originally posted by: Sremmos80
a reply to: Kapusta

You have much more trust in Rand then I do, not sure the old man rubbed off on him entirely.

But am willing to admit I have some details of this bill wrong.


Yeah , I would like to think that he's "playing the part " until he get's to the big house .

I say that because his Politicking has been solid throughout the years . But we both know that if he comes off as a full on Libertarian people are going to poke fun at him and call him a wingnut like they did to the good Dr. Paul when he was running .

So my gut feeling is that we will see a better change in him if hes elected .

Lets hope .



posted on May, 14 2015 @ 07:47 AM
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originally posted by: Kapusta



The House of Representatives voted to pass the USA Freedom Act on Wednesday, approving a bill that would change the way the National Security Agency gathers telephone data of American citizens. The bill now heads to the Senate.

The USA Freedom Act was passed overwhelmingly with 338 votes in favor and 88 against. Despite criticism that the legislation falls short of protecting Americans’ rights, the bill was approved without any amendments.


Why do I feel even if this bill had amendments it would not make much of a difference ?


Under the bill, the NSA would be prohibited from collecting telephone metadata under the Patriot Act. Instead, the agency would have to acquire a warrant every time it wanted to access phone records, which would be held by telephone companies. Officials would need to submit data requests via keywords in order to collect relevant data from companies.

The bill would also reform the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA Court) by setting up a five-person panel that would offer advise when intelligence agencies are seeking new interpretations of existing law. Some court rulings would need to be declassified.


We are just going to have to see how this plays out in the Senate .


However, privacy advocates have criticized the bill for not reining the NSA in further. The Freedom Act ends the NSA's bulk collection of telephone metadata, but it does not address the agency's online surveillance or other controversial programs.


So what do you think ATS is this a positive step against the Patriot act or a legal way to just continue the spying ?

Let's hear your thoughts
LINK

Kap


Yeah, while encouraging because this symbolizes some of our leadership at least waking up or resisting the domestic surveillance, I am doubtful that the CIA or NSA will just stop.



posted on May, 14 2015 @ 08:47 AM
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It's definitely a good first step, but unfortunately it is not enough.

I pray the status-quo Republicans don't come up with a new Patriot Act in the next year or so to retaliate.



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