It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Genetically modified lab-chickens resemble dinosaurs

page: 1
16
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 13 2015 @ 07:30 AM
link   
Just in time, before new Jurassic Park movie...


If you follow science and know who Dr. Jack Horner is, the same Jack Horner that was scientist helping Spielberg create blockbuster movie Jurassic Park, you probably have heard of term Chickenosaurus.



In his Ted Talk Dr. Horner actually points that what we have seen in movie actually can't be reproduced, it's bad science, but great movie blockbuster. But at the same time he points to research currently undergoing to turn velociraptor's closest relative, chickens, back into dinosaurs, because they have all required genes already, but they are just turned off.

Well, here are newst results about research undergoing...


Scientists trying to establish the evolutionary explanation for massive prehistoric reptiles eventually becoming modern-day birds have manipulated the proteins of embryonic chickens to make their beaks take the form of a dinosaur snout, according to a study published in the journal Evolution this Tuesday.



According to lead author Bhart-Anjan Bhullar, a Yale paleontologist, reversing the process by which chickens develop beaks so that they would grow a “snout” wasn’t difficult to do at all. He says the beak was a fairly recent development in bird evolution, coming long after birds developed the ability to fly. Beaks come in all shapes and sizes, and represent the specialization that species come to adapt in order to survive in unique habitats. Before beaks emerged, bird noses were blunt and primitive.

Bones called premaxillae, situated near the front of most animal jaws, eventually came to form what we know as beaks today. Over the course of thousands of years, chickens’ premaxillae fused and elongated, morphing into something that more resembles the beaks we recognize today.


Source: www.statecolumn.com...

This news makes me wonder what our creationist friends think about clear scientific evidence that dinosaurs evolved into birds/chickens and what is their take on research - should we support such research or should we stop it, as it just does not go well with creationism claims.
edit on 13-5-2015 by SuperFrog because: (no reason given)

edit on 5/13/2015 by tothetenthpower because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 13 2015 @ 07:48 AM
link   
They always make T-rex out to be a ferocious monster in those movies. And in reality he is just a big chicken.

Talk about Hollywood twisting things around.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 07:51 AM
link   
I was going to post this yesterday until I did a search. This story is originally from 2011 and I'm not sure if they've achieved anything new. I admit, I didn't compare the two articles.

Scientists seek to turn chickens into mini-dinosaurs


www.abovetopsecret.com...

EDIT: Here's the link to the journal.

Source


The avian beak is a key evolutionary innovation whose flexibility has permitted birds to diversify into a range of disparate ecological niches. We approached the problem of the mechanism behind this innovation using an approach bridging paleontology, comparative anatomy, and experimental developmental biology. First we used fossil and extant data to show the beak is distinctive in consisting of fused premaxillae that are geometrically distinct from those of ancestral archosaurs. To elucidate underlying developmental mechanisms, we examined candidate gene expression domains in the embryonic face: the earlier frontonasal ectodermal zone (FEZ) and the later midfacial Wnt-responsive region, in birds and several reptiles. This permitted the identification of an autapomorphic median gene expression region in Aves. In order to test the mechanism, we used inhibitors of both pathways to replicate in chicken the ancestral amniote expression. Altering the FEZ altered later Wnt responsiveness to the ancestral pattern. Skeletal phenotypes from both types of experiments had premaxillae that clustered geometrically with ancestral fossil forms instead of beaked birds. The palatal region was also altered to a more ancestral phenotype. This is consistent with the fossil record and with the tight functional association of avian premaxillae and palate in forming a kinetic beak.

edit on 13-5-2015 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 07:52 AM
link   
a reply to: SuperFrog

Wait wait! Do you think we can call this DEvolution? I usually tell people that organisms can't devolve because evolution always proceeds forward, but this is actually taking an organism and reverting it to a prior evolutionary form (at least one part of the organism).



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 08:03 AM
link   
Yes, multiple teams working on this what Krazysh0t rightfully calls DEvolution makes it hard to follow all research done and progress that has been mode.

Thanks for sharing of the links.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 08:09 AM
link   
Back in the day...


We raised a Turkey one year when we lived in the high desert of California. Before Jurassic park from just seeing that thing while it was young walking around the Joshua trees and sand with little/few feathers gave me the very distinct impression it came Dinosaurs.

Then it grew up, got all it's feathers and became nice and plump, we had no choice but to eat it



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 08:18 AM
link   
Kentucky Fried T-Rex...
we just need gravy.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 08:19 AM
link   
My mom still grows and butchers her own chickens. She purchased some "large breasted" fryers. She didnt realize they were geneticly modified, and she didnt get them butchered on time, so the breasts got so huge, the hens couldnt walk, and the breasts began blowing up and killing the hens.

They didnt look like dinosaurs though.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 08:24 AM
link   
The common chicken is a direct descendant of the velociraptor. As it develops in the egg it shows many common traits with them including a membrane in its beak which closely resembles its ancestors teeth.The scientists involved were or are trying to genetically modify the chicken back to its velociraptor beginnings. Dont know whether this bodes well for mankind or not



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 08:48 AM
link   
Not sure how many of you have seen or heard about Southern Cassowarry, but those birds to me have all signs of their ancestors, dinosaurs.





The Southern Cassowarry is a rainforest dwelling member of the ratite family, native to Northwestern Australia and New Guinea. Cassowaries have black plumage and blue skin patches, with a bony head plate that gives it a saurian appearance. These birds weigh over 130 pounds, stand nearly 6 feet tall, and are fiercely territorial.

Armed with razor sharp spurs and one of the strongest kick forces of any animal, Cassowaries will not hesitate to challenge a perceived threat. Human intruders into Cassowary habitat have been ripped open, disemboweled or killed instantly by the force and slicing effect of a Cassowary attack


Sources:
listverse.com...
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 08:54 AM
link   
a reply to: SuperFrog

Nice pic, still has a "modern" beak though. I wonder when the long tongue on the hummingbird came into being via evolution, hard to imagine the ancient dinos running around with huge tongues (or to quote the wolf, 'better to eat you with'). Random thought: Dinos/birds are much better to contemplate and enjoy if you don't eat them.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 08:55 AM
link   

originally posted by: GothmogThe scientists involved were or are trying to genetically modify the chicken back to its velociraptor beginnings. Dont know whether this bodes well for mankind or not


Judging from your avatar, no (gulp).



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 09:02 AM
link   
a reply to: SuperFrog

They are actually labelling this bird as the "missing link" between the two.



Hesperornis was a large flightless bird that swam in the oceans and snared fish with a tooth-lined beak. Its small wings were held close in to the body and were of little use beyond possibly helping it steer through the water. Instead, Hesperornis relied on its powerful hind legs and webbed feet to chase prey and evade predators in the Cretaceous seas. A flattened tail may have helped the bird change depth and direction underwater.

Apparently the genes associated with the formation of their beaks share similarities between the Velociraptor and Archaeopteryx. These genes also exist in today's chickens and have been either switched off or dormant through evolution.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 10:34 AM
link   
It's funny how obvious it becomes when you actually observe and analyze chickens. The head movement, the way they interact, it's almost exactly how velociraptors are portrayed by scientists. I was on a farm over the weekend, to visit my mom for mother's day, and they have chickens, geese and ducks. When you sit back and watch how they interact, it's almost uncanny that they came from dinosaurs. Just imagine a raptor with feathers and you have a bigger, meaner looking, smarter chicken. Scientists have found that the ancestor of raptors had feathers and recently an arm was discovered with quills, so there's a good chance that velociraptor was actually fully feathered.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 10:39 AM
link   

originally posted by: Barcs
It's funny how obvious it becomes when you actually observe and analyze chickens. The head movement, the way they interact, it's almost exactly how velociraptors are portrayed by scientists. I was on a farm over the weekend, to visit my mom for mother's day, and they have chickens, geese and ducks. When you sit back and watch how they interact, it's almost uncanny that they came from dinosaurs. Just imagine a raptor with feathers and you have a bigger, meaner looking, smarter chicken. Scientists have found that the ancestor of raptors had feathers and recently an arm was discovered with quills, so there's a good chance that velociraptor was actually fully feathered.

Now the popular theory goes that a lot of "dinosaur" species did have feathers especially the velociraptors



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 11:01 AM
link   
And to think, we've all been afriad they'd destroy the world with a mutated virus that turns humans into zombies...

when it appears we will be overrun by genetically modified dino-chickens.


it will either be very scary, or very tasty... Oo


edit on 13-5-2015 by sn0rch because: midnight and insomnia...



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 11:08 AM
link   
a reply to: SuperFrog

Just a thought. Reptile DNA and Avian DNA must be similar and highly conducive towards interbreeding and dramatic independent genetic mutation. I don't think time would be so influencial in evolution as genetic purity and standardized similarity between species.

I bet the key to the greatest genetic breakthroughs will come from research into reptile DNA.

Maybe dinosaurs have a unique DNA and they are a precursor to reptile DNA but are something entirely different. Like a cross between mammals and reptiles. Or something that led into what we now know of the two.


edit on 5 13 2015 by tadaman because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 11:10 AM
link   
a reply to: SuperFrog

They say they are not hatching the eggs. Maybe I am a horrible person, but damn it I want to see a dino chicken.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 11:31 AM
link   
a reply to: Gothmog

Thank you for pointing to mistake in my post, I've sent U2U to moderator to see if they can fix it in opening post.

I am sure we will do just fine... as long as we don't destroy ourselves by other means.

Quote from Dr. Sagan always comes into mind, when he tells what he wonders about aliens and one of question is - Are they also dangers to themselves.


edit on 13-5-2015 by SuperFrog because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 12:17 PM
link   

originally posted by: SuperFrog
a reply to: Gothmog

Thank you for pointing to mistake in my post, I've sent U2U to moderator to see if they can fix it in opening post.

I am sure we will do just fine... as long as we don't destroy ourselves by other means.

Quote from Dr. Sagan always comes into mind, when he tells what he wonders about aliens and one of question is - Are they also dangers to themselves.


Not needed to correct. You were absolutely on point.The velociraptor is considered a dinosaur



new topics

top topics



 
16
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join