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Could Rising Oceans Affect Tectonic Plates

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posted on May, 12 2015 @ 08:47 AM
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Scientists recently determined the oceans are rising faster than previous calculations. Is it possible with the increasing ocean volume, thus more weight, its affecting the Tectonic plates?




posted on May, 12 2015 @ 08:53 AM
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a reply to: bucsarg

The moons gravity and the tides have more effect.

So do the winter snow pack, polar caps and spring thaw.

The mean rise of oceans from melt is steady at ( 3 ) mm a year…

NASA

image of chart

Then theres the earths spin, its dynamo core, drag from the suns gravity and friggin' Fracking.

edit on 12-5-2015 by intrptr because: additional and links



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 08:54 AM
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a reply to: bucsarg

First off, remember that sea level does not rise uniformly on Earth, and some areas even see their level dropping.



secondly, I believe that most earthquakes are caused by horizontal movements of the tectonic plates (they slide), whereas the weight of water would simply result on vertical motion of the plates.



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 08:58 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr

The moons gravity and the tides have more effect.


A common misconception - it is actually very unlikely that the Moon causes earthquakes.


The moon probably doesn't cause earthquakes (...) While the moon does exert a gravitational force on the Earth, the strength of that force is very small, less than a millionth as large as the force of gravity from the Earth itself. Add to this the fact that the Earth is constantly shivering and shuddering with earthquakes due to the much larger stresses of plate tectonics and the movements of molten rock deep within. Perhaps it isn't any wonder that earthquakes due to the moon have never been convincingly demonstrated.


www.livescience.com...




posted on May, 12 2015 @ 09:01 AM
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a reply to: swanne

Very interesting premise but i would have thought that this partial redistribution would potentially cause problems in some areas. For example, Tonga / Fiji / Samoa / PNG would have either less or more weight (depending upon the sea rise in that area) in the worlds most unstable tectonic area. Surely this extra stress could potentially cause an uptick in tectonic activity?



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 09:06 AM
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a reply to: swanne


A common misconception - it is actually very unlikely that the Moon causes earthquakes.

I didn't suggest the moon causes quakes.

Sea level change from "Global Melt" is puny compared to tidal ebb and flow.

[snip]
edit on 12/5/15 by masqua because: Removed uncivil comment from quote



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 09:07 AM
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a reply to: Flavian

Perhaps. But then, it is the only place where sea rise happen to match a quake hot spot.

Chili, on the other hand, has alot of quakes, but according to the map its sea level is steady. Nepal has had two catastrophic quakes in less than a moth, yet its location is on land (no sea at this location).

I fear there is not enough data to say with certainty that there is a causation between sea level and major earthquake events.



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 09:24 AM
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a reply to: swanne

I actually agree with you here, i was more wondering if certain areas would be more susceptible rather than as a rule.

As a side note, i am certainly glad that Nepal has had no changes in sea level heights!



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 09:34 AM
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originally posted by: bucsarg
Scientists recently determined the oceans are rising faster than previous calculations. Is it possible with the increasing ocean volume, thus more weight, its affecting the Tectonic plates?


I would say yes,it is possible.
A man made example would be the 3 gorges dam in China made earthquakes occur due to the weight of the water behind the dam.
It also altered the spin rate of the earth by a tiny fraction.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 12:33 PM
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I would suggest NO. The volume of water that is raising has already been accounted for in the full weight of the water surrounding the globe. It is spread out over the whole surface.



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 02:18 PM
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a reply to: bucsarg

As the caps melt, land will begin to rise, that can not but effect tectonic plates. How much? That remains to be seen.



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 02:25 PM
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a reply to: seagull

True... as the ice recedes from Antarctica, their weight reduces and the crust rises. This is what occurred to North America after the last ice age.

But, at the same time, as the sea level rises, the weight of the water pushes down the sea bed, causing affected plates to become more unstable. It's like football... the game of inches.




posted on May, 12 2015 @ 02:35 PM
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originally posted by: bucsarg
Could Rising Oceans Affect Tectonic Plates


Yes. But, then again, they could also not affect the plates.

That's all I have, because I'm not a fan of speculating on such things. Although, I sure wish you would have linked to an article or two that has the data backing up the claim of the faster-rising oceans. I guess that claim depends on whose predictions they were using, because I was under the impression that, with the North Pole's ice being completely gone by this year, that Key West should be Key Gone.



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 02:45 PM
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a reply to: bucsarg

Not sure if your source is the Guardian or not, but I found this article which agrees that sea level is rising faster. I thought including it might help in the debate.


Watson’s team found that the record of sea level rise during the early 1990s was too high. The error gave the illusion of the rate of sea level rise decreasing by 0.058 mm/year 2 between 1993 and 2014 , when in reality it accelerated by between 0.041 and 0.058 mm/year 2 . This brings the records into line with the modelling of the UN’s climate science body, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

“We see acceleration, and what I find striking about that is the fact that it’s consistent with the projections of sea level rise published by the IPCC,” said Watson. “Sea level rise is getting faster. We know it’s been getting faster over the last two decades than its been over the 20th century and its getting faster again.”


www.theguardian.com...
edit on 12/5/15 by masqua because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 02:47 PM
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originally posted by: bucsarg
Scientists recently determined the oceans are rising faster than previous calculations. Is it possible with the increasing ocean volume, thus more weight, its affecting the Tectonic plates?


Sea level rise is from two primary causes: increased temperature, and new water from melting ice.

Increased temperature lowers the density but not the overall mass or weight of the oceans by that mechanism.

Overall mass increases are from ice melting from land to the sea.

Most of the effect from global warming on solid crust is melting of glaciers and release of their mass from surface, as that's localized. Additional mass from melt water on the oceans is not likely to be important geologically as it's spread out.


edit on 12-5-2015 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)

edit on 12-5-2015 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 02:49 PM
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nm
edit on 12/5/15 by masqua because: (no reason given)


(post by galeofdeath removed for a serious terms and conditions violation)

posted on May, 12 2015 @ 04:44 PM
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Yes. That was my source. Thank you.
a reply to: masqua



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 05:25 PM
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a reply to: masqua

Actually, I seem to recall reading somewhere that Greenland actually has more ice than Antarctica. I may be miss remembering that, though...

I actually thought that was kind of odd, which is why it stuck with me.



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 05:33 PM
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a reply to: seagull

That is surprising, since Greenland is 2,166,086 km² while Antarctica is 14,000,000 km², 6 times larger.

Maybe it has to do with the more mountainous terrain in Greenland. I dunno...



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