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Exposure To Conspiracy "May Have Negative Effect"

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posted on May, 11 2015 @ 09:31 PM
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What do you guys think of this article. This woman claims conspiracy makes us feel "powerless" and many other things. I think keeping an open mind is just another way to survive.
o.canada.com...


I guess "they" think it's odd there are so many conspiracies, seemingly as if a conspiracy theory is just another side of a two-sided story, yet information shows millions still believe.



Indeed, there are alternate explanations for everything from the NASA moon-landing to the death of Marilyn Monroe.

“There’s not just one type of person who believes in conspiracies. Millions of different people believe in them,” said Jolley.



edit on 5/11/2015 by OfManAndWolf because: Forgot link




posted on May, 11 2015 @ 09:44 PM
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a reply to: OfManAndWolf

The problem with conspiracies is that some of them may be true. It is upsetting to nearly everyone to find out that what they believe and hold as true is incorrect. They may question their own choices. Also, in a way conspiracies are a call to action, to change the world.

The truth, or at least an approximation, demands quite a bit.



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 09:59 PM
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originally posted by: OfManAndWolf
What do you guys think of this article. This woman claims conspiracy makes us feel "powerless" and many other things. I think keeping an open mind is just another way to survive.
o.canada.com...


I guess "they" think it's odd there are so many conspiracies, seemingly as if a conspiracy theory is just another side of a two-sided story, yet information shows millions still believe.



Indeed, there are alternate explanations for everything from the NASA moon-landing to the death of Marilyn Monroe.

“There’s not just one type of person who believes in conspiracies. Millions of different people believe in them,” said Jolley.


Personally, I believe exposure to crappy journalism and the inundation of elitist propaganda through main stream media sources causes an appreciable decrease in measurable IQ. Have you noticed lately that most of these alleged journalists can't spell, miss words and cannot put a sentence together properly half of the time. It makes reading the "rags" almost painful. The glass tit presentations of ***infotainment-propaganda-news*** are better scripted of course, at least somebody checks the teleprompters, but the presenters do seem a tad vacuous and flippant.

I am not being critical of users at ATS, as many of us are rushed and of course we are not paid for readable perfection (I make many mistakes, but I'm an engineer and physicist so I get a free pass, everybody knows we can't do that writing thing, LOL). The object here I suppose at ATS is primarily to get a point, idea, story, link, etc. across the sea of electrons and hopefully increase knowledge and awareness.

ETA: With a name like Misty, I wonder what she does on the side (nudge nudge wink wink). BTW, I am kind of ashamed she's in Canada, in a way, for the stereotypers out there, it shines a dull light on some of our alleged journalists. You'd think they'd know better, being journalists.

Cheers - Dave
edit on 5/11.2015 by bobs_uruncle because: the ETA



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 10:17 PM
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a reply to: OfManAndWolf

The whole article presumes that there is no such thing as a conspiracy... Does anyone honestly think that there has never been a conspiracy? LOL

That is just as naive as believing that there has never been a person who seemed honest all his life and then suddenly became corrupt.

The article also seems to assume that if you believe in conspiracy theories, there is something wrong with you and this will cause social problems. But then it goes on to mention that 70% of Americans think that there was a wider plot to the JFK assassination (that automatically means conspiracy and a full blown cover-up).

Then: 63% of Americans believe in at least one conspiracy theory. Do you see the problem here? That is completely absurd if 70% believe that the JFK assassination was a conspiracy, especially taking into account the large number of different conspiracies people believe in.

Something else to consider: The "9/11 conspiracy theory" for example is not the only conspiracy theory of that event. The official story is also a conspiracy theory (19 Muslims with box cutters conspired to fool the whole of the US defence and highjacked 4 planes without a bullet fired at them). Meanwhile, there is A LOT more proof for the first theory than for the second. But I guess it can't be called a conspiracy theory if it involves people outside of the west...

The utter stupidity just keeps on blowing my mind. I have read articles of this type from university professors in philosophy and sociology.

soulwaxer



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 10:18 PM
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a reply to: OfManAndWolf

Conspiracy theories only make you feel powerless if you believe them.

I've been exposed to conspiracy theories on this site for ten years. I don't feel disempowered, but I have come to believe that people are far more gullible (and stubbornly irrational ) than I used to think they were.

I think conspiracy theories do hurt believers in the long run; believers turn into outsiders, at odds with society. I've seen it happen more than once. Conspiracy theorists are like drug addicts: they damage their own support networks of family and friends through their behaviour and their attitude. Small wonder they then start to feel disempowered!

Conspiracy theories also cause great damage to society if they come to be widely believed. I think this is one of the greatest potential dangers of the Internet, one that is only now coming to be realized and is still only dimly understood.

The records of Above Top Secret are sure to be of great interest to future psychologists and sociologists. That, of course, is hoping good sense ultimately prevails. If the conspiracy peddlers win the day, those records may only be accessible to archaeologists.



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 10:27 PM
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Now there's something you don't see every day.

A conspiracy about conspiracies?



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 10:29 PM
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originally posted by: Astyanax
a reply to: OfManAndWolf

Conspiracy theories only make you feel powerless if you believe them.

I've been exposed to conspiracy theories on this site for ten years. I don't feel disempowered, but I have come to believe that people are far more gullible (and stubbornly irrational ) than I used to think they were.

I think conspiracy theories do hurt believers in the long run; believers turn into outsiders, at odds with society. I've seen it happen more than once. Conspiracy theorists are like drug addicts: they damage their own support networks of family and friends through their behaviour and their attitude. Small wonder they then start to feel disempowered!

Conspiracy theories also cause great damage to society if they come to be widely believed. I think this is one of the greatest potential dangers of the Internet, one that is only now coming to be realized and is still only dimly understood.

The records of Above Top Secret are sure to be of great interest to future psychologists and sociologists. That, of course, is hoping good sense ultimately prevails. If the conspiracy peddlers win the day, those records may only be accessible to archaeologists.

You have been reading about conspiracy theories on this site for 10 years and you don't believe ANY of it??? Don't you have something more productive to do?

Even if only one of the conspiracy theories was true, it would be very irresponsible to say that conspiracy theories damage society. No, it's the conspiracy that damages society, not the theory.



soulwaxer



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 10:33 PM
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a reply to: soulwaxer


The whole article presumes that there is no such thing as a conspiracy...

That's not quite correct. It merely proceeds from the assumption that all conspiracy theories are false.


Does anyone honestly think that there has never been a conspiracy?

No, but I have yet to hear a conspiracy theory that turned out to be true. And I've been ten years on this site.

I started a thread about it once. Got shut down by the Overlord himself.



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 10:53 PM
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a reply to: Astyanax

I suppose that depends on your definition of a conspiracy theory.

There is no doubt there are legitimate conspiracies have happened and it is probable some will happen in the future.

There is also the problem of proving a conspiracy theory. Once a conspiracy theory is proofed it is no longer a conspiracy theory.

I would like to add Nathan Rothschild and Napoleon's Waterloo as proof of an actual conspiracy that I came across on ATS.

edit on 11-5-2015 by jrod because: add



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 10:54 PM
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originally posted by: Astyanax
a reply to: soulwaxer


The whole article presumes that there is no such thing as a conspiracy...

That's not quite correct. It merely proceeds from the assumption that all conspiracy theories are false.


Does anyone honestly think that there has never been a conspiracy?

No, but I have yet to hear a conspiracy theory that turned out to be true. And I've been ten years on this site.

I started a thread about it once. Got shut down by the Overlord himself.


That is a serious failure in logic. Assuming that all conspiracy theories are false is exactly the same as assuming that there is no such thing as a conspiracy. I suggest you read up on the history of the term "conspiracy theory".

As to your second point: Look up Operation Northwoods and the Gulf of Tonkin incident. There are several others.

soulwaxer



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 10:57 PM
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originally posted by: jrod
a reply to: Astyanax

I suppose that depends on your definition of a conspiracy theory.

There is no doubt there are legitimate conspiracies have happened and it is probable some will happen in the future.

There is also the problem of proving a conspiracy theory. Once a conspiracy theory is proofed it is no longer a conspiracy theory.


I can only think of one definition of a conspiracy theory. Can you list more than one?

soulwaxer



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 10:59 PM
link   

originally posted by: Astyanax
a reply to: soulwaxer


The whole article presumes that there is no such thing as a conspiracy...

That's not quite correct. It merely proceeds from the assumption that all conspiracy theories are false.


Does anyone honestly think that there has never been a conspiracy?

No, but I have yet to hear a conspiracy theory that turned out to be true. And I've been ten years on this site.

I started a thread about it once. Got shut down by the Overlord himself.


Never a true conspiracy theory?
Either you've never braved to challenge your own beliefs or you're living in de Nile, like way upper de Nile.
I'll give you 2 to start with
Operation Gladio and Operation Northwoods.



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 11:07 PM
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a reply to: soulwaxer

I have found in the court of law, and official city hall meetings precise definitions of a term are important.

I am sure some will argue that the events mentioned are not a 'true conspiracy' and what not.

No true Scotsman.....



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 11:25 PM
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a reply to: OfManAndWolf

"Exposure To Conspiracy "May Have Negative Effect""

you bet. JFK got bad headache from one (conspiracy).
edit on 11-5-2015 by deckdel because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 11:25 PM
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Conspiracies can be fun as you get to play detective and try to work out the facts from the fiction. They can also be frustrating as they are full of claims, counter claims, lies and wild exaggerations. Hard to know what to make of some stories and perspectives at times.

If you do happen to work your way through one of the many information quagmires, then what is left from the implications also has its own challenges and negative aspects to consider. When exploring conspiracies it is good to be aware of side effects like 'powerlessness', 'disillusionment', 'depression' and others.

I do not like to consider what negative effects may result if we shut our brains of to reality.

edit on 11-5-2015 by kwakakev because: grammer



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 11:35 PM
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Half the conspiracies out there are because they have us barking up the wrong tree. Our focus has been shifted so strongly that we cannot correctly see reality. We have been led to believe lies and they have conditioned us to look at the wrong things so we cannot see the whole picture and see that it is full of flaws.



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 07:38 AM
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Personally, I believe exposure to crappy journalism and the inundation of elitist propaganda through main stream media sources causes an appreciable decrease in measurable IQ. Have you noticed lately that most of these alleged journalists can't spell, miss words and cannot put a sentence together properly half of the time. It makes reading the "rags" almost painful. The glass tit presentations of ***infotainment-propaganda-news*** are better scripted of course, at least somebody checks the teleprompters, but the presenters do seem a tad vacuous and flippant.

I am not being critical of users at ATS, as many of us are rushed and of course we are not paid for readable perfection (I make many mistakes, but I'm an engineer and physicist so I get a free pass, everybody knows we can't do that writing thing, LOL). The object here I suppose at ATS is primarily to get a point, idea, story, link, etc. across the sea of electrons and hopefully increase knowledge and awareness.

ETA: With a name like Misty, I wonder what she does on the side (nudge nudge wink wink). BTW, I am kind of ashamed she's in Canada, in a way, for the stereotypers out there, it shines a dull light on some of our alleged journalists. You'd think they'd know better, being journalists.

Cheers - Dave


Awesome input, man. Wish I was a physicist/engineer. Oh well.

I have definitely increased my awareness, and am glad to finally meet a bunch of others doing the same thing. Keep fighting the good fight, man.

P.S- Should build me a satellite Mr.Smarty pants,
edit on 5/12/2015 by OfManAndWolf because: I suck so bad



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 07:43 AM
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originally posted by: deckdel
a reply to: OfManAndWolf

"Exposure To Conspiracy "May Have Negative Effect""

you bet. JFK got bad headache from one (conspiracy).


Hahaha how did your reply not get any stars yet. ^



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 07:48 AM
link   

originally posted by: soulwaxer
a reply to: OfManAndWolf

The whole article presumes that there is no such thing as a conspiracy... Does anyone honestly think that there has never been a conspiracy? LOL

That is just as naive as believing that there has never been a person who seemed honest all his life and then suddenly became corrupt.

The article also seems to assume that if you believe in conspiracy theories, there is something wrong with you and this will cause social problems. But then it goes on to mention that 70% of Americans think that there was a wider plot to the JFK assassination (that automatically means conspiracy and a full blown cover-up).

Then: 63% of Americans believe in at least one conspiracy theory. Do you see the problem here? That is completely absurd if 70% believe that the JFK assassination was a conspiracy, especially taking into account the large number of different conspiracies people believe in.

Something else to consider: The "9/11 conspiracy theory" for example is not the only conspiracy theory of that event. The official story is also a conspiracy theory (19 Muslims with box cutters conspired to fool the whole of the US defence and highjacked 4 planes without a bullet fired at them). Meanwhile, there is A LOT more proof for the first theory than for the second. But I guess it can't be called a conspiracy theory if it involves people outside of the west...

The utter stupidity just keeps on blowing my mind. I have read articles of this type from university professors in philosophy and sociology.

soulwaxer



I hear you, friend. People this closed off actually upset me. Although we are all entitled to our own way of thinking - I find it funny she suggests we are a danger to society for thinking for ourselves. It would seem more dangerous to look at a something that has two sides, and deliberately choose only to see one.



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 07:52 AM
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a reply to: soulwaxer

There ARE true conspiracies. Just that most of them discussed on this site are ridiculous. The idea that there are these overarching and grand conspiracies effecting every minute detail of our lives is outrageous. REAL conspiracies tend to be one off things where a group of people do something then try to get away with it by covering it up.

Also the REAL long running conspiracies, no one wants to talk about. It's amazing how close minded the conspiracy theorists end up being when faced with a REAL long running conspiracy. I can think of a few that would require people to trust their government a bit more to overturn, so naturally the "open minded" dismiss it as bogus. Then there are others that are done BY the government, but they don't want to sign off on because for some reason they think what the government is doing there is the right thing.
edit on 12-5-2015 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)




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