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Regarding Those Bright Spots on Ceres. . . WE WERE WRONG!

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posted on May, 13 2015 @ 02:32 PM
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originally posted by: Char-Lee
a reply to: Answer




2) Something we can't fathom yet that's unique to this particular landscape and will be a very exciting discovery. I have a feeling that this is the most likely explanation.


Yes I agree and hope also, were we not supposed to be seeing new closeups by now, or am I remembering wrong?


The schedule has been posted a few times and I think we're supposed to get new photos in the next couple of days.




posted on May, 13 2015 @ 03:40 PM
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a reply to: Answer

I tried to find the most logical explanation for the brightness coming from those crater on Ceres.
As been said that they see more lights on Ceres , I slowly starting to lean to the possibility that this could by a city cave or multiple caves . And the light casts all the brightness into space.

If not, it's something I never have heard of in my whole life I guess. But would they really tell us , could this be the beginning?



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 03:48 PM
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originally posted by: Char-Lee
a reply to: Answer




2) Something we can't fathom yet that's unique to this particular landscape and will be a very exciting discovery. I have a feeling that this is the most likely explanation.


Yes I agree and hope also, were we not supposed to be seeing new closeups by now, or am I remembering wrong?


Dawn's closest approach to Ceres won't be until December. The images we have seen so far were taken at a relatively high-altitude orbit (called the RC3 orbit, which was at 8400 miles). Dawn is now spiraling down on its way to its next scheduled orbit, called the "Survey Orbit", which it will reach in June. The Survey Orbit at 2700 miles in altitude is closer than the RC3 orbit, but still relatively high up. We may need to wait for one of the low-altitude orbits to get very high resolution images, which won't be until later this year. As I mentioned, Dawn does not reach its lowest orbit until December (The LAMO orbit of 230 miles)

That lowest orbit will be 40 times closer than Dawn is now, and about 10 times closer than Dawn will be in June. However, the HAMO orbit of 900 miles will probably also yield some great hi-res images (hopefully hi-res enough to resolve the bright spots with clear detail). That HAMO orbit will begin in August.


Source:
Dawn Journal - March 31, 2015


edit on 5/13/2015 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 04:31 PM
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originally posted by: 0bserver1
But would they really tell us , could this be the beginning?





One thing's for sure... if Dawn or her cameras suffer any sort of malfunction and we never get hi-res pictures of the bright spots, the world will be crying ALIEN COVER-UP! til' the end of days.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 05:26 PM
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a reply to: Answer




One thing's for sure... if Dawn or her cameras suffer any sort of malfunction and we never get hi-res pictures of the bright spots, the world will be crying ALIEN COVER-UP! til' the end of days.


One relief for them, they are used to that...

edit on 0b49America/ChicagoWed, 13 May 2015 17:28:49 -0500vAmerica/ChicagoWed, 13 May 2015 17:28:49 -05001 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 08:03 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

THanks for the infos, Soylent!



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 08:04 PM
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originally posted by: Answer

originally posted by: 0bserver1
But would they really tell us , could this be the beginning?





One thing's for sure... if Dawn or her cameras suffer any sort of malfunction and we never get hi-res pictures of the bright spots, the world will be crying ALIEN COVER-UP! til' the end of days.


Yawn... like it'd be the first time NASA does something sketchy to cover up peculiar data?



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 08:08 PM
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originally posted by: Echtelion

originally posted by: Answer

originally posted by: 0bserver1
But would they really tell us , could this be the beginning?





One thing's for sure... if Dawn or her cameras suffer any sort of malfunction and we never get hi-res pictures of the bright spots, the world will be crying ALIEN COVER-UP! til' the end of days.


Yawn... like it'd be the first time NASA does something sketchy to cover up peculiar data?


This is the first time they've publicly shown an anomaly, said "wow, we're baffled and don't know what this is", and had to wait just like the rest of us to get a closer look.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 08:13 PM
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The whole "ice reflection" theory is fudge. Even professional astronomers recognized that it can't be reflections of the Sun due to the fact that the spots remain the same at different angles, and in the dark,

My guesses:

- the planet's upper crust is thin and what we're seeing are an unknown luminescent matter that lies below the surface, OR the planet's shallow and this is the light from a sun-like core. The light being emitted could pass through holes made my meteors breaking through the crust. Imagine a planet that's like a coconut with a few holes punched through the shell, only with the inside white flesh being bright like a 100W light bulb.

- unknown artificial structures emiting light. But why all the same intensity and color of light?

- space station! And those lights are actually hangar bays. Like you know... Star Wars stuff.

- Ice? Naaaa...


One way or another, we're set for a major breakthrough here.... a "shallow egg" planet, or one that's filled with a strange luminous stuff would be quite hard to swallow for the conservative astronomers, while the revelation of artificial structures would be even more inconvenient for them to explain.
edit on 13/5/15 by Echtelion because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 08:20 PM
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originally posted by: Answer

originally posted by: Echtelion

originally posted by: Answer

originally posted by: 0bserver1
But would they really tell us , could this be the beginning?





One thing's for sure... if Dawn or her cameras suffer any sort of malfunction and we never get hi-res pictures of the bright spots, the world will be crying ALIEN COVER-UP! til' the end of days.


Yawn... like it'd be the first time NASA does something sketchy to cover up peculiar data?


This is the first time they've publicly shown an anomaly, said "wow, we're baffled and don't know what this is", and had to wait just like the rest of us to get a closer look.



Well, true... I suppose that it's one of these rare moments in history where pretty much everyone is on the same page!



posted on May, 14 2015 @ 10:02 AM
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It's possible, of course, that the bright spots are both reflectors and sources of light. It was noted some time ago that there was a strong enhancement in their spectrum at a wavelength of 550 nanometers, at around local noon. That's in the range where green changes to yellow.
This suggests the possibility that the strongest sunlight of the day was reflected by something of that color. An interesting coincidence (?) that 550 nanometers also happens to be the peak sensitivity of the human eye, as far as daylight (color) vision is concerned.
A surface of greenish-yellow color might also mean a source of light that is optimized for the greatest sensitivity of human vision.



posted on May, 14 2015 @ 10:12 AM
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originally posted by: Ross 54
It's possible, of course, that the bright spots are both reflectors and sources of light. It was noted some time ago that there was a strong enhancement in their spectrum at a wavelength of 550 nanometers, at around local noon. That's in the range where green changes to yellow.
This suggests the possibility that the strongest sunlight of the day was reflected by something of that color. An interesting coincidence (?) that 550 nanometers also happens to be the peak sensitivity of the human eye, as far as daylight (color) vision is concerned.
A surface of greenish-yellow color might also mean a source of light that is optimized for the greatest sensitivity of human vision.


That would certainly be interesting if it turned out that the reflective surfaces are a beacon meant for us.
edit on 5/14/2015 by Answer because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 14 2015 @ 10:17 AM
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a reply to: Echtelion




the planet's upper crust is thin and what we're seeing are an unknown luminescent matter that lies below the surface, OR the planet's shallow and this is the light from a sun-like core. The light being emitted could pass through holes made my meteors breaking through the crust. Imagine a planet that's like a coconut with a few holes punched through the shell, only with the inside white flesh being bright like a 100W light bulb.

I like that, like a dust covered weak sun, some so far unknown chemical processes in the relatively big core with a thin crust on top.

Do we know how warm Ceres is?

edit on 14-5-2015 by Peeple because: q



posted on May, 14 2015 @ 11:20 AM
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The surface temperatures on Ceres reportedly run from minus 38 to minus 138 Celsius (minus 37 to minus 226 Fahrenheit). The bright spots temperature measure the same as the surrounding terrain. If the bright spots were a very hot something inside the planet peeking through holes in the surface, shouldn't they show a much higher temperature?



posted on May, 14 2015 @ 12:11 PM
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Sunlight, with very little or no atmosphere to absorb it, such as falls on Ceres' surface, has a rather sharp peak at about 450 to 470 nanometers. The 550 nm peak at the bright spots is conspicuously shorter in wavelength, so it isn't a matter of their simply reflecting the same light they receive.
The visual range of the human eye runs from about 390 to 700 nanometers. That's 310 sectors (bins), each 10 nm wide. The odds of the bright spots on Ceres having a strong peak in the very same sector as the highest human visual sensitivity seems, then, to be about 1 in 310, leaving aside any possible complicating factors.

edit on 14-5-2015 by Ross 54 because: added information

edit on 14-5-2015 by Ross 54 because: improved verbal description



posted on May, 14 2015 @ 12:48 PM
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originally posted by: Ross 54
The surface temperatures on Ceres reportedly run from minus 38 to minus 138 Celsius (minus 37 to minus 226 Fahrenheit). The bright spots temperature measure the same as the surrounding terrain. If the bright spots were a very hot something inside the planet peeking through holes in the surface, shouldn't they show a much higher temperature?


People keep saying his and I keep pointing out...
I think it may be important that they are not the same temps.




Also, the temperatures of the two prominent bright spots vary: one is similar to the surrounding surface, while the other is cooler.

www.space.com...



But for some reason Spot 5—the brightest feature seen on Dawn—does not show up in infrared images. “One possibility is that we still don’t have enough resolution to see it in the proper way,” said Tosi.

www.scientificamerican.com...



posted on May, 14 2015 @ 02:36 PM
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Yes, the odd temperatures of the area 5 bright spots could be very important. A light-colored area should be substantially cooler than a dark one, as was the case with the fainter, area 1 spot.
Until we learn the true diameter of of the area 5 spots, it's difficult to say if the low resolution temperature measurements of them were likely to have been accurate or not.
I inquired of the JPL, through their 'ask a scientist' program, if the diameter of the area five spots was now determinable. I've waited three days, but had no response.

Perhaps the readings were accurate, and not swamped by too large a swath of terrain around them. If that is so, there is presumably some source of heat making up the difference between the lower expected temperature, and the the higher one observed.
Ceres is a very cold place. It's hard to imagine a natural source for such heat. Perhaps the heat source could have some connection to a light source, should one actually exist.
edit on 14-5-2015 by Ross 54 because: improved paragraph structure.

edit on 14-5-2015 by Ross 54 because: improved paragraph structure.



posted on May, 14 2015 @ 03:21 PM
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a reply to: torok67 Well we do taste like chicken. And you know how good chicken is.



posted on May, 14 2015 @ 11:46 PM
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Should it not be obvious it cant be highly reflective ice for the same reason no ice meteors or past moon's have ever shown to reflect that brightly in space? If it were the case to be a common occurrence of bright ice rocks travelling through space of the same luminosity, then yes one could make the easy claim that this is ice naturally reflecting the sun from either crashed ice rocks or naturally occurring ice from the moon.
edit on 14-5-2015 by andre18 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2015 @ 12:17 AM
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originally posted by: andre18
Should it not be obvious it cant be highly reflective ice for the same reason no ice meteors or past moon's have ever shown to reflect that brightly in space? If it were the case to be a common occurrence of bright ice rocks travelling through space of the same luminosity, then yes one could make the easy claim that this is ice naturally reflecting the sun from either crashed ice rocks or naturally occurring ice from the moon.

Some of the moons in the Solar System reflect very brightly because they are covered in ice. Saturn's moon Enceladus is brighter than snow:



Keep in mind that Ceres is a very dark object overall, so the exposure and contrast stretching they might have used to make the images brighter made the bright spots so blindingly white.



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