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Regarding Those Bright Spots on Ceres. . . WE WERE WRONG!

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posted on May, 12 2015 @ 04:24 PM
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originally posted by: tigertatzen
a reply to: abeverage




I would love it were something utterly unknown!


Ditto! And if we could get our hands on it that'd be boss too




Yeah it would be but do you honestly think that would be let out? However I doubt the public would take up pitchforks & torches if that is the fear...

I am still on the fence as to NASA's knowledge of anomalies (extraterrestrial or ancient human). Its a big place how would you keep so many quiet and in this day an age with anyone with a phone (janitor) could snap a pic and share it with the world?




posted on May, 12 2015 @ 04:42 PM
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originally posted by: olaru12

This will be settled when the probe goes to the dark side of Ceres. If there is light on the darkside, I doubt if NASA will tell us.


I was wondering the same thing, when will the Dawn probe be on the dark side of Ceres? It seems that will settle the reflective theory once and for all.

All reckless speculation thus far. The only thing that we do know right now, is that we do not know for sure what those bright spots are, right now. ~$heopleNation



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 04:42 PM
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Well it does look dome like at the start

www.universetoday.com...
But couldn't that just be a central peak with some sort of snow on it?


You know that is what they are gonna say! You know! I do however find it amazingly unique it only appears to be in one crater! Why not several if it is some sort of ice or snow? Why is this found in only one large crater? Why is one of them oblong shaped? Fascinating if it is a ice peak in that respect...

That or its a downed Transformers spacecraft....
edit on pmbAmerica/ChicagovAmerica/ChicagoTue, 12 May 2015 16:49:23 -0500pm4America/Chicago by abeverage because: link and text



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 06:28 PM
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a reply to: abeverage
Looking at the different slides, and the shadow changes in each slide I would expect that the reflection should change from the sat point of view.?

But it's still as bright over all those slides. That doesn't make sense. .

I also noticed some sort of blackness in th soil around the crater. .

Could the core from ceres be leaking liquid iron or mercury to the surface?

edit on 0b13America/ChicagoTue, 12 May 2015 18:29:13 -0500vAmerica/ChicagoTue, 12 May 2015 18:29:13 -05001 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 07:11 PM
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originally posted by: 0bserver1
a reply to: abeverage
Looking at the different slides, and the shadow changes in each slide I would expect that the reflection should change from the sat point of view.?

But it's still as bright over all those slides. That doesn't make sense. .

I also noticed some sort of blackness in th soil around the crater. .

Could the core from ceres be leaking liquid iron or mercury to the surface?


I have to disagree with the reflection the last slide is very telling for anything with luminosity. Whatever it is, it is highly reflective!

Now liquid metal would actually be pretty damn interesting!

The oblong rectangularish area is highly interesting to me!



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 07:22 PM
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a reply to: abeverage

It is a reflective alien technology for heating/lighting. Aliens Exist!



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 07:26 PM
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NASA stated that the "heat signature" from the bright areas was the same as the surrounding darker areas.
Could be a clue that there is a focal issue..

The energy spectrum emitted from the crater has uniform intensity but the crater dishing focuses waves in the visible spectrum to the current orbit of the satellite.

Where would a solution like that scale?



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 08:35 PM
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It might be left over ice from the impact of the asteroid that caused the crater. The asteroid providing a solid surface for the ice/water to stay. The problem with that idea is ice might sublimate in the extreme cold. If so all that would be left might be salt from it. It doesn't seem very likely there would be that much salt or other reflective material only centered there.
The best far our theory would be a heat fed geyser constantly putting the water into the air. The lack of air cause the water to return to the surface and the cycle to complete. That would explain the side view of the area having a extended glow above the crater. That leaves the question on how or what is generating the heat. Left over radioactivity from a crashed ancient probe?
Too far out I yield the floor to more intelligent responses.



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 09:01 PM
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originally posted by: abeverage

originally posted by: Charizard
Anyone notice that one of the "bright spots" seems to stand up above the surface of Ceres and even cast a shadow? My eyes may be playing tricks on me but if you watch the lower left hand corner you'll see it appear. Here's a screepcap of what I'm talking about:



I can't tell if that's actually a shadow from the bright object or a shadow of a small crater behind it. Either way it definitely stands out.


That caught my attention too! If you look at image 9 it appears to have a shadow...

Where did you get that image? At the site image 7 is an anaglyph and does not appear to be in the rotation series...ODD!


It's very interesting isn't it? The picture is just a screencap I took from the animated GIF showing the rotation of Ceres that's linked in the OP's post. I don't have the software to make a full animated image highlighting the track of this mystery spot through the whole rotation so I had to settle for a single image.



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 10:08 PM
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a reply to: jaffo

Only one thing left to do...




P.S Do not waste your time watching this movie.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 01:45 AM
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a reply to: abeverage

Maybe silicium but I don't know if it can be formed naturally ? It's highly reflective to my knowledge



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 07:41 AM
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originally posted by: Emerys
a reply to: jaffo

Only one thing left to do...




P.S Do not waste your time watching this movie.


Yeah, really disappointing.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 08:19 AM
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originally posted by: datasdream
It might be left over ice from the impact of the asteroid that caused the crater. The asteroid providing a solid surface for the ice/water to stay. The problem with that idea is ice might sublimate in the extreme cold. If so all that would be left might be salt from it. It doesn't seem very likely there would be that much salt or other reflective material only centered there.
The best far our theory would be a heat fed geyser constantly putting the water into the air. The lack of air cause the water to return to the surface and the cycle to complete. That would explain the side view of the area having a extended glow above the crater. That leaves the question on how or what is generating the heat. Left over radioactivity from a crashed ancient probe?
Too far out I yield the floor to more intelligent responses.


Ceres is believed to have a lot of water-ice under its surface. Ceres is thought to be comprised of 25% water-ice, with a thick shell of water-ice directly beneath a thin dusty crust. There are some scientists who have hypothesized way in which the interior of Ceres may be warm enough for some of that water to be in liquid form, so there could possibly be a process that is allowing the sub-surface water to percolate up to the surface, and that water may be carrying dissolved minerals and salts with it.

Perhaps that mineral salt-laden water sublimates upon reaching the surface, leaving behind a crust of light-colored mineral salts (similar to a dry salty lake bed).


edit on 5/13/2015 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 11:12 AM
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originally posted by: 0bserver1
a reply to: abeverage
Looking at the different slides, and the shadow changes in each slide I would expect that the reflection should change from the sat point of view.?

But it's still as bright over all those slides. That doesn't make sense. .

I also noticed some sort of blackness in th soil around the crater. .

Could the core from ceres be leaking liquid iron or mercury to the surface?


When the first .gif came out showing the rotation, I made the same observation and that is the most interesting part, in my opinion.

So in order for this to happen, the reflective surface has to be A) elevated above the crater rim and B) at least somewhat dome shaped in order to be illuminated as the crater passes into darkness.

The brightness doesn't change as the crater passes into shadow. It's not until the crater rotates enough that the "bright spot" is pointing directly away from the camera that the bright spot disappears.

The intensity of the bright spot doesn't seem to change throughout the rotation sequence and that's the intriguing part.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 11:57 AM
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The other photo on the right side, is inverted (white has been changed to black, black into white, and greys into darker or lighter greys accordingly).

Entering darkness

blogdredd.blogspot.com...



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 01:09 PM
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originally posted by: Char-Lee

Entering darkness



I'd like to point out some interesting things in the second photo from the viewpoint of an artist in photography and drawing...

First: The light source (obviously the sun) is coming from the lower left side of Ceres but the bright spot is shining as though the sun is directly above it.

Second: The right side of the crater rim is still dimly illuminated... and if the bright spot is on the peak of a mountain/volcano, we should see a shadow on the right side of the crater's rim that correlates with the light source and the position of the peak. Logically, the peak would have to rise above the rim of the crater in order to remain illuminated after the lower portions of the crater have passed into darkness... but we don't see evidence of a shadow from the peak.

Third: What we see is the OTHER bright spot still illuminated even though the mountain/volcano that would supposedly have to form the peak for the larger bright spot should have already blocked the sun from reaching that lower-lying area. What we should see if they are both mountain peaks is the smaller bright spot on the right should get dimmer than the main spot as Ceres rotates into darkness because the mountain/volcano blocks sunlight from reaching that spot first.

Now, if the brightness is from some sort of luminescent material that stays bright for a bit after Ceres rotates into darkness, that explains the discrepancies. Otherwise, the "it's a simple reflection" explanation really doesn't hold up when you analyze the light source and shadows.




edit on 5/13/2015 by Answer because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 01:23 PM
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a reply to: Answer

So what are you thinking? The inverted color pictures reminds me of the China hole that opened recently.
www.dailymail.co.uk... side.html



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 01:50 PM
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a reply to: abeverage




I am still on the fence as to NASA's knowledge of anomalies (extraterrestrial or ancient human). Its a big place how would you keep so many quiet and in this day an age with anyone with a phone (janitor) could snap a pic and share it with the world?


I honestly don't think that NASA as an agency is falsifying information. I do however think that someone behind the scenes is controlling their puppet strings, and they are 100% aware of this. You're absolutely right; anyone could take pics/video and share it, so they're not going to be nonchalant about security. But they have a huge advantage because they are adept at convincing people that all things extraterrestrial are simply imaginary and whoever believes otherwise is stark raving loony...brilliant, really. Whoever "they" may be.



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 02:20 PM
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originally posted by: Char-Lee
a reply to: Answer

So what are you thinking?


Well, a hole in the bottom of the crater would certainly be interesting but it doesn't explain why we can see the bright spot above the horizon as it rotates into view on the sunlit side... or why we can still see it as it rotates into darkness.

Whatever is providing the light/reflection has to be elevated off of the crater floor at least somewhat but I can't say for sure that it's higher than the crater rim because of the light/shadow effects I mentioned before.

Some things I've personally ruled out:
1) A plume of reflective material. Doesn't make sense because the bright spots are so consistent in shape and brightness as Ceres rotates.

2) A pool of ice/water at the bottom of the crater. This doesn't make sense because of the light/shadow effects during rotation.

3) A volcanic peak with a depression at the top that's filled with ice/water. Again, the light/shadow effects don't support this.

This only really leaves a few possible explanations:

1) A range of mountain peaks that are capped with reflective material and rise to a height barely above the crater rim. This would be strange to see in the bowl of a crater but not impossible. I'm not totally sold on this because you should see the side of the mountain illuminated somewhat just like the crater rim but instead, we only see the bright spot.

2) Something we can't fathom yet that's unique to this particular landscape and will be a very exciting discovery. I have a feeling that this is the most likely explanation.

3) An artificial structure that is cylindrical/dome shaped and covered in reflective material OR produces its own light source that reads as natural light to Dawn's instrumentation. The odds are infinitely small but it would explain the strange light and shadow effects of the reflection. While drawing, I've shaded literally hundreds of spheres with different textures and varying light-source angles and I really can't explain the effects we're seeing with the bright spots in that crater.
edit on 5/13/2015 by Answer because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2015 @ 02:29 PM
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a reply to: Answer




2) Something we can't fathom yet that's unique to this particular landscape and will be a very exciting discovery. I have a feeling that this is the most likely explanation.


Yes I agree and hope also, were we not supposed to be seeing new closeups by now, or am I remembering wrong?



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