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How badly of really off are the "poor people" of the United Kingdom

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posted on May, 10 2015 @ 02:03 PM
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originally posted by: blupblup
a reply to: nonspecific


There are currently 3.5 million children living in poverty in the UK. That’s almost a third of all children. 1.6 million of these children live in severe poverty . In the UK 63% of children living in poverty are in a family where someone works .

These child poverty statistics and facts will help to give you an idea of the scale of child poverty in the UK and the affect it can have on:

a child's education
a child's health
the day to day lives of families.






Three-year-olds in households with incomes below about £10,000 are 2.5 times more likely to suffer chronic illness than children in households with incomes above £52,000 .
Infant mortality is 10% higher for infants in the lower social group than the average.





Only 48 per cent of 5 year olds entitled to free school meals have a good level of development at the end of their reception year, compared to 67 per cent of all other pupils.
Less than half of pupils entitled to free school meals (just 36 per cent) achieve 5 GCSEs at C or above, including English and Maths, this compares to 63 per cent of pupils who are not eligible.




1.6 million children are growing up in homes which are too cold 41 per cent of children in the poorest fifth of households are in families who can’t afford to replace broken electrical goods, compared with just 3 per cent of children in the richest households.
59 per cent of children in the poorest fifth of households have parents who would like to, but cannot afford to take their children for a holiday away from home for one week a year. This only applies to 6 per cent of children in the richest fifth.


www.barnardos.org.uk...




The UK is the world's sixth largest economy, yet 1 in 5 of the UK population live below our official poverty line, meaning that they experience life as a daily struggle.





Oxfam's vision is for everyone in the UK to have enough to live on, and for all men, women and children to be treated with respect and dignity no matter how much money they have. We believe it is unacceptable that over 13 million people in the UK do not have enough to live on, and most do not have the power to speak out about what this feels like and why it is wrong. We work with others to achieve a fairer and more equal country, in which everyone in the UK can live free from poverty and shame. We do this in three ways:

We develop projects to improve the lives of people living in poverty
We work with policy-makers to tackle the causes of poverty
We raise public awareness of poverty to create pressure for change

Discrimination and prejudice play a large role in the lives of people experiencing poverty. That is why challenging negative attitudes and addressing gender and race inequality are integral parts of our work.


policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk...





Some interesting point and one's I will take a look at and hopefully be able to get back to you.

A couple straigt off the bat if I may, 1.6 million children living in homes that are too cold, that's not right but I grew up in a house with no central heating or double glazing, just a coal fire in the living room and neither I or my siblings died. what is deemed too cold please?

" Only 48 per cent of 5 year olds entitled to free school meals have a good level of development at the end of their reception year, compared to 67 per cent of all other pupils."

Again a shocking figure but is there direct evidence to suggest that this is attributed to income as opposed the the level of education of the parents of these children, this can be applied to a few others in there as well.


edit on 10/5/2015 by nonspecific because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 10 2015 @ 02:03 PM
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It depends on the country and if they can afford to house and supply these and more. Living should be more than just a day to day process. In a perfect world , everyone would have just the basics and the means in which to secure a better life for themselves. But this is not that world . The value of a man,woman, or child's life is sadly not worth much these days. a reply to: nonspecific



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 02:05 PM
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I am not poor.

But let me say this.

The biggest problem these people have is the entitlement society, this absurd idea that UK.gov owes you, they owe you money so you can sit about unemployed as you"look" for a job, you are owed DLA because of your bad back and stress, they owe you that council house and while they are at it because of your low self-esteem you they owe you a boob-job.

And at the same time these same people are disgusted by things like the bedroom tax (they have to get the money for your boob job somewhere), they are disgusted by zero-hour contracts (better than not having a job) they complain about the NHS and cry about how long the bins are talking to be collected.

My attitude is this.

If you feel like you are one of the poor guys who is being hard done by, then get up off your bum and get a job or a better job if that's what your after. The role of the nanny state i feel in this is to provide you with those skills necessary to get you into work and to ensure that there are jobs.

If you want to see real poverty or see what a bad social welfare system looks like go spend a few weeks in Sudan.
edit on 10-5-2015 by OtherSideOfTheCoin because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 02:06 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific

I don't think there is poverty in the UK, I think there is inequality and a big gap between the richest and the poorest.
Real poverty happens in developing countries, where people have no housing, no food, no clothes, etc.
In the UK there is relative poverty, which means families having to visit food banks, children that cannot afford sports or private activities as they are expensive, parents not being able to take the kids on holidays or eating out or cinema, etc.

But, whilst the 'poorest' in the UK may not starve, they still live in undesirable conditions that shows the widening gap between classes.



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 02:17 PM
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originally posted by: Agartha
a reply to: nonspecific

I don't think there is poverty in the UK, I think there is inequality and a big gap between the richest and the poorest.
Real poverty happens in developing countries, where people have no housing, no food, no clothes, etc.
In the UK there is relative poverty, which means families having to visit food banks, children that cannot afford sports or private activities as they are expensive, parents not being able to take the kids on holidays or eating out or cinema, etc.

But, whilst the 'poorest' in the UK may not starve, they still live in undesirable conditions that shows the widening gap between classes.


Some valid points.

Would you say that those visiting food banks are doing so out of povery or bad financial managment on the whole?

Is it not the responsibility of the parent who cares so strive to give there child the best life they can?

Is it really ok to be on the bottom rung of the ladder with no real desire to make things better and then complain about it.

Some people have to be poor, that's just the way of things.

If you are not prepeared to make the best life for you and your family not expect a little hardship on the way are you not somewhat delusional?



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 02:19 PM
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originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin
I am not poor.

But let me say this.

The biggest problem these people have is the entitlement society, this absurd idea that UK.gov owes you, they owe you money so you can sit about unemployed as you"look" for a job, you are owed DLA because of your bad back and stress, they owe you that council house and while they are at it because of your low self-esteem you they owe you a boob-job.

And at the same time these same people are disgusted by things like the bedroom tax (they have to get the money for your boob job somewhere), they are disgusted by zero-hour contracts (better than not having a job) they complain about the NHS and cry about how long the bins are talking to be collected.

My attitude is this.

If you feel like you are one of the poor guys who is being hard done by, then get up off your bum and get a job or a better job if that's what your after. The role of the nanny state i feel in this is to provide you with those skills necessary to get you into work and to ensure that there are jobs.

If you want to see real poverty or see what a bad social welfare system looks like go spend a few weeks in Sudan.


I forsee an angry mob with pitchforks and burning torches in your imminent future.

I would lock and bolt the door if I were you, I feel you may be up for a grilling over that.

I can't say I disagree with you though.



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 02:23 PM
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There realy shouldn't be poverty in this country as the local councils are there to help people out in their time of need

Income support is about 58 pound a week
Child support is minimum of 500 pound a year or near
Housing benefit will pay all rent
Council tax bill will be null

58 pound a week isn't a great deal to be honest but if your sensible with utility bills you can eat and have a roof over your head with no council tax

I'm sure there might be other benefits someone could get



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 02:26 PM
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originally posted by: Whereismypassword
There realy shouldn't be poverty in this country as the local councils are there to help people out in their time of need

Income support is about 58 pound a week
Child support is minimum of 500 pound a year or near
Housing benefit will pay all rent
Council tax bill will be null

58 pound a week isn't a great deal to be honest but if your sensible with utility bills you can eat and have a roof over your head with no council tax

I'm sure there might be other benefits someone could get







As you say it's not a lot but when in that situation what do you really expect until you get back on your feet?

It's amazing how so many of the "poor" who complain have sky tv for example.

And nike trainers.



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 02:28 PM
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originally posted by: nonspecific


Some valid points.

Would you say that those visiting food banks are doing so out of povery or bad financial managment on the whole?

Is it not the responsibility of the parent who cares so strive to give there child the best life they can?

Is it really ok to be on the bottom rung of the ladder with no real desire to make things better and then complain about it.

Some people have to be poor, that's just the way of things.

If you are not prepeared to make the best life for you and your family not expect a little hardship on the way are you not somewhat delusional?


Of course it depends on the parents. I have known single mums on benefits that spent their money on necessary things and their kids never suffered, and I have seen parents on benefits spending it all on their own addictions, leaving their kids in miserable conditions.

Things have not changed much since Victorian times, and yes a small percentage of the UK population will always be poor. But, whilst parents should be responsible for their children, those children did not pick their parents and should not have to pay for their parents inability or selfishness... therefore the government should help those kids that deserve to live a 'normal' childhood. I don't mind paying taxes to make sure those children get all the help they need.

Many may not agree with me, but this is my personal view on the subject.



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 02:36 PM
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a reply to: Agartha

It is a good viewpoint to hold in my opinion.

So you are in agreement that it is the education system that is at fault as with decent education these situations would not be there to be addressed?



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 02:38 PM
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How poor is acceptable in one of the worlds richest nations? I mean some people will only be happy if we go back to poverty standards of the 1940s. I would hope we can do better than that.
I think it's also important that we teach our young that there are more important things to life than the latest material items and money. Things like community and society are important and bring value to people's lives that you can't put a price tag on. I know rich people who arnt happy and poor people who are happy. It's important that we don't look at everything for its cost, but more its value.



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 02:44 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific The original question is loaded. You should edit the posting.



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 02:46 PM
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originally posted by: reldra
a reply to: nonspecific The original question is loaded. You should edit the posting.



Could you elebroate please? I will not edit the Op as it would distort past posts but am willing to ammend anything afterwards if I feel it justified.



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 02:50 PM
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a reply to: Whereismypassword




Housing benefit will pay all rent


Sorry to be nit picky but for clarification

There is a cap on how much rent HB will pay
All on benefits are now required to pay around £20 per month council tax

Though this may be down to each individual local authority to decide

EDIT TO ADD ... The figures are for my local authority
Rent cap is around £100 per month
edit on 10-5-2015 by artistpoet because: (no reason given)

edit on 10-5-2015 by artistpoet because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 02:54 PM
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originally posted by: nonspecific
a reply to: Agartha

It is a good viewpoint to hold in my opinion.

So you are in agreement that it is the education system that is at fault as with decent education these situations would not be there to be addressed?


Thank you, nonspecific.


Education is key: a poor child who does well at school may end up getting to higher education and become an adult who is not poor. But to break that vicious circle is not easy task and sometimes the simple fact that those kids copy their parents means that they will stay poor, regardless of all the help they may get until they are 16.

University fees should be lower for youngsters on a poor income, to give everybody the same chance to succeed in life. That is one thing England needs right now, in my opinion.



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 02:55 PM
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originally posted by: artistpoet
a reply to: Whereismypassword




Housing benefit will pay all rent


Sorry to be nit picky but for clarification

There is a cap on how much rent HB will pay
All on benefits are now required to pay around £20 per month council tax

Though this may be down to each individual local authority to decide

EDIT TO ADD ... The figures are for my local authority
Rent cap is around £100 per month


It is all down to the local housing authority as to the cap for housing benifit and means tested and based on your needs.

Info for those interested can be found here.

LHA



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 03:00 PM
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originally posted by: Agartha

originally posted by: nonspecific
a reply to: Agartha

It is a good viewpoint to hold in my opinion.

So you are in agreement that it is the education system that is at fault as with decent education these situations would not be there to be addressed?


Thank you, nonspecific.


Education is key: a poor child who does well at school may end up getting to higher education and become an adult who is not poor. But to break that vicious circle is not easy task and sometimes the simple fact that those kids copy their parents means that they will stay poor, regardless of all the help they may get until they are 16.

University fees should be lower for youngsters on a poor income, to give everybody the same chance to succeed in life. That is one thing England needs right now, in my opinion.




I am not sure as to my opinion on university fee's, on the one hand I agree that a university education should be for all but I feel that the achivement of getting a degree has been lessened with the amount of people able to gain one. a different day for that one I think.

I will say though that my stepchildren came from a "Poor family" council house, low wage, we struggled to give them as much as we could and as much help and encouragement as we could and there both now at university after getting straight A's and are truly well balanced people with hopefully bright futures ahead of them.

Being "poor" did not seem to have affected them aas much as you would think



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 03:13 PM
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I know when being on benefits.....
You can`t just replace something like a fridge, tv, cooker or similar.
You can`t afford to eat out at a restaurant....even on your birthday .
You can`t afford a car or holiday.
You can`t afford to pay or help put money toward your daughters wedding.
You can`t afford to take your kids to a sport event or the cinema.
You can`t afford attend a wedding as you and your wife need an outfit and a wedding present.
You can`t afford to pay for your kids to go on school outings or events with other kids.
You have to say no when being invited to party's, the theartre etc .....

I could go on but basically you don`t have enough to put something aside for a rainy day.
This also goes for people on minimum or low wage.
Living on a housing estate like i do, it`s pretty widespread as we have a high unemployment rate and most people who work are on low wages so it differs in areas.



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 03:23 PM
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a reply to: lambros56

I understand it may be hard so do not take thie following in the wrong way please.

replacing an electrical item. Can you not apply for a crisis loan, or use your local freecylce/buy second hand?

Is monet tight that you cannot put a little aside for special events? £1 a week is £52 in a year, that must be enough for a slap up meal at a cheap eatery?

Do you need a car or is this something you want? as for a holiday can you not visit freinds for a break?

A wedding I cannot say they are expensive but can she not fund it herself if she is in the position to get married and you are unable to help?

Charity shops and sales a great way to get a formal outfit, I recently bought a suit, shirt and tie from teso's for under £30, It will last me at least 10 years given how often I will wear it.
As to kids outings can you not plan ahead and save a little here and there for this eventuality?

Perties are usually free but if you are on low income then is the theatre not a luxury and something that you should endeavour to work to in the future when you have managed to put yourself in a more stable position?

Please understand that I am in a similar position and this in intended in a positive way.



posted on May, 10 2015 @ 03:25 PM
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originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin
I am not poor.

But let me say this.

The biggest problem these people have is the entitlement society, this absurd idea that UK.gov owes you, they owe you money so you can sit about unemployed as you"look" for a job, you are owed DLA because of your bad back and stress, they owe you that council house and while they are at it because of your low self-esteem you they owe you a boob-job.

And at the same time these same people are disgusted by things like the bedroom tax (they have to get the money for your boob job somewhere), they are disgusted by zero-hour contracts (better than not having a job) they complain about the NHS and cry about how long the bins are talking to be collected.

My attitude is this.

If you feel like you are one of the poor guys who is being hard done by, then get up off your bum and get a job or a better job if that's what your after. The role of the nanny state i feel in this is to provide you with those skills necessary to get you into work and to ensure that there are jobs.

If you want to see real poverty or see what a bad social welfare system looks like go spend a few weeks in Sudan.


Or alternatively just look at some areas within cities of the U.K and you can find poverty is doing just fine thanks.

Just because you don't see it out of your window, it doesn't mean it doesn't exist in the U.K. Whether you like it or not.







 
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