It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

BMD interceptors trained with GPS...

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 22 2004 @ 11:03 AM
link   
I've read that many people feel that by putting a GPS receiver/transmitter in the nose of a target Ballistic Missile is basically outrageous. Well here's something to think about, just occured to me.

When training a drug sniffing dog, use the real thing and train the dog to react a certain way. When training an interceptor missile do the same kind of thing AND collect all the data so that it can be replicated. Upon data analysis, you can improve your trajectory paths, speeds, angles etc etc. basically improve on the software mathematics calculations!

Since this is a 'Test' scenario, wouldn't you do the same thing?
And also wait for the weather to be clear so that optimal data collection would occur?

For those of you who think this is an incorrect/wrong assessment, please respond.

Tuataras Third Eye




posted on Dec, 22 2004 @ 11:14 AM
link   
Im sure they are comparing the actual position of teh missile (using GPS) to where the Intercepters and Radar think it is.

Common Sense

[edit on 22-12-2004 by Vanguard]



posted on Dec, 23 2004 @ 12:24 PM
link   

Originally posted by Tuatara
I've read that many people feel that by putting a GPS receiver/transmitter in the nose of a target Ballistic Missile is basically outrageous. Well here's something to think about, just occured to me.

When training a drug sniffing dog, use the real thing and train the dog to react a certain way. When training an interceptor missile do the same kind of thing AND collect all the data so that it can be replicated. Upon data analysis, you can improve your trajectory paths, speeds, angles etc etc. basically improve on the software mathematics calculations!

Since this is a 'Test' scenario, wouldn't you do the same thing?
And also wait for the weather to be clear so that optimal data collection would occur?

For those of you who think this is an incorrect/wrong assessment, please respond.

Tuataras Third Eye


I completely agree. In any scientific test the object is to reduce the number of variables to as little as possible.

If every test was in bad weather/no tracking aids it would be much harder to determine what failed/worked and fix it....



 
0

log in

join