It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

OMG It's going to rain in California. Will the storm bring the BIG ONE!

page: 1
21
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 7 2015 @ 08:31 AM
link   
Hello. By sheer coincidence, I was checking on the Los Angeles weather forecast to check on how long the drought is to continue. Well, the good news is that there is at least a bit of relief in near future. I even found a weather warning of snow. Spring isn't over yet. There was also snow in the new democratic province of Alberta, Canada. Or, as one Conservative MP called it, "Albertastan" (Really, Mackaw?) They had a warmish winter, while we in the east were enjoying the snow and cold. The day after tomorrow it will be 30 C here in Southern Ontario. Hmmm.

Anyway. Here's the weather report...

"An area of low pressure may bring some scattered rain and cooler conditions across Southern California on Thursday and Friday.

The system will bring cold air down from the Pacific Northwest and destabilize the atmosphere. This may result in scattered showers and even some hail and thunderstorms in the foothill areas.

Also, the system may bring some waterspouts and gale-force winds offshore."
...

abc7.com...


By coincidence again, two weeks ago a ATS member asked about drought and earthquakes. This subject gets me tickled. Because it's one of the few subjects that I am especially keen in researching. I am firmly convinced that water and earthquakes have a much stronger relationship than we think at present. Water is found deep in our crust in a crystalized form. The water in our atmosphere may not have entirely came from dirty, icy snowballs from space. I don't asteroids are the be all and end all of everything evolutionary. No.

Here's the thread where I've provided information to show that it was a rainy California before the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake. I even found some rain in California for a spell in 1989. 1989 was right in the middle of a drought period. The earthquake came after some relief from the drought.

I'm not trying to predict. Really. I just watch. Here's za thread.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

I guess I should try and find that Chinese research on drought which I claimed exists. I know this because I've written about it way back when. I'm so freakin' old. And tired. Which is why I may not find the information. You may do that. I can relax because I know I've already done my homework and found many sources and many cases where rain and water cause earthquakes. (Cough- I write about fracking and -cough- earthquakes- cough- frackquakes) I think we also can safetly say that we know that if you dam a giant river and create a massive resoviour you will put an enormous strain on faultlines and cause earthquakes. Yes, I'm talking to you, China.

Believe it not. Mr Holland, who is a geologist who works for the state of Oklahoma, claimed that rainfall in lakes around the state was the reason for the uptick in earthquakes. It was later found that he was pressured by the oil boys. You know, the bosses. Anyway, I had actually had to give his argument ten seconds of thought because there was lots of rain at that time, and I do believe in the relationship of water and earth. I need to create a whole new branch of science that deals with this as a central focus. Yes, I know we already have geophysicists, but they are missing the point. They should be aquaphysicists. I know I'm being somewhat ridiculous. I just think the focus is wrong. Just like the geologist of the 19th Century, they figure things were very static and slow moving. It has taken geologist that think some processes can happen quick and in a giant way. For example, look up the Missoula Floods. en.wikipedia.org... You'll find Brentz was thinking in a 20th Century way and those around him were stuck in stone age. Notice that his idea was power by water. The sudden immense change came as a result of the force of water. Just like the mega power of a tsunami. I think we all can see that now. I'm old, so back before 2004, I never understood the real monster behind a giant earthquake wasn't the rocking shaking and breaking. No, it was the water rocking and rocking and rising up. See. The water's the thing. Not the rock. Rock, slow. Water, quick.

Sorry. My obsession. To prove we're looking down the wrong end of the telescope.

Where was I? Oh yeah, it's going to rain in California. Hooray.

I not predicting. Nor, wishing for a quakes. I hope it doesn't happen. But, just like a group here on ATS, I read Quake Watch 2015.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Sorry, I should really post this there. But I sometimes save space. I couldn't find a direct link between northern Nevada and Challis, Idaho. The pattern changed. Moving on.

So, in closing, I am very glad the rain will help easy the drought and suffering.



edit on 7-5-2015 by ericblair4891 because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-5-2015 by ericblair4891 because: (no reason given)



+7 more 
posted on May, 7 2015 @ 08:35 AM
link   
When it rains in SoCal, hillsides collapse, homes are destroyed and people die.
When it doesn't rain, there are brush fires, homes are destroyed and people die.

Sounds like a good reason to live somewhere else.

Then there are the earthquakes.....



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 09:03 AM
link   
It sorta makes sense that rain could help trigger a quake, you have the extra weight and the water also acts as a lubricant. On the other hand, I don't know jack about quakes and always look to TA for good info.
edit on 7-5-2015 by DAVID64 because: typo



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 09:07 AM
link   
a reply to: ericblair4891


"An area of low pressure may bring some scattered rain and cooler conditions across Southern California on Thursday and Friday.

They say that all the time, may bring rain, could cause showers, we're used to that. its the morning hope via the weather report.

Meanwhile, Big Agro and Mega industry usin' up all the water.



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 09:13 AM
link   

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: ericblair4891


"An area of low pressure may bring some scattered rain and cooler conditions across Southern California on Thursday and Friday.

They say that all the time, may bring rain, could cause showers, we're used to that. its the morning hope via the weather report.

Meanwhile, Big Agro and Mega industry usin' up all the water.

Yeah, that reminds me of the old joke about wanting to have the job of a San Diego weatherman....
'Today, it will be 75 degrees and sunny, tomorrow it will be 75 degrees and sunny......'



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 09:21 AM
link   
a reply to: butcherguy


Then there are the earthquakes…..

What earthquakes?

Natives don't call the little stuff quakes, we call them, "Did you feel that?" Then theres the next serious level, some stuff fell off shelves, followed by broken glass and car alarm symphony. In the midwest, tornados do that almost every day. Let alone friggin golf ball hail…

The last sixer here was a decade ago…

quaketrack



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 09:26 AM
link   
a reply to: intrptr

Yes, I should double checked the maps. There is a system, but it appears to be in Northern California. Scratch that. There is definitely precipitation in Central California. The future map shows about four clouds in the southwest part. Sacramento looks like the area where storms will be heaviest. So, The report is a bit misleading. And since the "Big One" area will still be dry.

At least this will help the drought somewhat. Every California should be mandated to put out all the buckets and bowls they have to catch every drop.


Oh, l'll add this here to comment on your reply to butcherguy. Yes, California has been on the low side of biggish earthquakes. I just read an article that states that very fact. The geologist goes on to say that this means that there is lots of stored up energy that needs to be released. It's better to have lots and lots of little ones. That's not even happening enough to release enough pressure. Which is why I watch the weather there- because as you know, I think the water will be the lubricant.

And in truth, the rain needed not be directly on the fault in order to effect the fault. Rain in a nearby zone can start the process there. In that same article, the geologist said that it can be a series of large quakes. Meaning, that nearby faults can move and this puts pressure on the larger fault which then ruptures.


I'm editing again to write that I found the article. Or an article. This says the big one will set of a series in other zones. I guess I'm looking at the telescope from the wrong end now.

www.latimes.com...

And, while I was searching for that bit, I found this curious article about a slight uptick in Cali quakes. I must say I regularly watch California so I now was relatively normal. I must say that things are basically normal. Although, there have been a few in L.A. and heck, there was one near the state capital where the low pressure is currently located. I think both Puterman and myself think that barometric pressure can influence earthquakes as well.

www.latimes.com...

"IT was an active seismic day in California, with small earthquakes rattling residents across Northern California and the Inland Empire on Wednesday morning.

Although conspiracy theories are tempting, earthquake experts said there’s no reason to think they’re connected.

Even the three quakes in Riverside County were too far apart to all be linked. The first two, a magnitude-3.7 and -2.7 that struck shortly after midnight, both were traced back to the San Jacinto fault zone. But the third temblor, a magnitude-3.1 near Corona at 9:11 a.m., occurred in a different fault zone.
Scientists are still studying the details of the third earthquake, which occurred near the Elsinore and Whittier faults, Caltech seismologist Jennifer Andrews said.

As for the first two, it seemed like business as usual for the San Jacinto fault zone, a major network of faults in Southern California.

"We see relatively small earthquakes [on the San Jacinto fault], but it's relatively active," Andrews said.

Hundreds of miles north, in California’s East Bay area, three small earthquakes shook the Concord area Wednesday morning."...


There's even a related story about oil wells being NOT connected to some earthquakes. Ah, fracking....

Really, I liked the last story cause it said conspiracy theories are tempting... hehe
edit on 7-5-2015 by ericblair4891 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 09:27 AM
link   

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: butcherguy


Then there are the earthquakes…..

What earthquakes?

Natives don't call the little stuff quakes, we call them, "Did you feel that?" Then theres the next serious level, some stuff fell off shelves, followed by broken glass and car alarm symphony. In the midwest, tornados do that almost every day. Let alone friggin golf ball hail…

The last sixer here was a decade ago…

quaketrack





This one.

The death toll was 57, with more than 5,000 injured. In addition, earthquake-caused property damage was estimated to be more than $20 billion, making it one of the costliest natural disasters in U.S. history.

Northridge Quake
Not sure.... but California seems to have more destructive EQs than most states.



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 09:28 AM
link   
a reply to: butcherguy

You must not live in CA. If you have mountains and rolling hills, eventually you will get a mudslide or a brushfire. Where civilization has moved in, there will be effects. If you live in the flatlands somewhere, good for you, no mudslides....and no mountain view. FYI-the last earthquake of any significance was in 1992 in So Cal. 22 years ago. a whole generation of kids here do not even know what all the fuss is about. Now, today, Oklahoma has been hit by tornadoes. Just goes to show, every region has its pros and cons.

Don't get too excited about rain. they've been talking up this storm for a week, just like the last one a few weeks ago. The sun is peeking through the clouds above me as we speak. I don't think we will get much. Most of So Cal is technically a desert. I live in it and know it is unnatural for us to really expect to live here with any abundance of water. I just have to hope that the drought that has been going on for really 8 years, is going to end soon(next winter?). The jet stream has not been kind.



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 09:29 AM
link   

originally posted by: butcherguy

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: ericblair4891


"An area of low pressure may bring some scattered rain and cooler conditions across Southern California on Thursday and Friday.

They say that all the time, may bring rain, could cause showers, we're used to that. its the morning hope via the weather report.

Meanwhile, Big Agro and Mega industry usin' up all the water.

Yeah, that reminds me of the old joke about wanting to have the job of a San Diego weatherman....
'Today, it will be 75 degrees and sunny, tomorrow it will be 75 degrees and sunny……'

More fire storms than rain storms, lol. Inversion layers with smog so thick the sun sets behind it.

Not even the breath of forty million people is allowed to condense. Outside the basin its desert in every direction. LA will die of thirst long before its turned to rubble by quakes.



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 09:32 AM
link   
a reply to: ericblair4891

Haha! The amount of rain we get down here might fill half a bucket! And there's probably some law saying you can't collect your own rainwater! Oh, the world we live in!



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 09:33 AM
link   
a reply to: ericblair4891

By Big One, I sure hope you aren't referring to the myth that a super strong earthquake will separate California from the rest of the Americas. If you weren't then just disregard this post.



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 09:35 AM
link   
a reply to: SunnyDee




You must not live in CA.

Spent some time out there, but no, I don't live there. I have to admit, it isn't high on my list of intended future residences.



FYI-the last earthquake of any significance was in 1992 in So Cal. 22 years ago.

You might want to research the Northridge quake of 1994.



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 09:39 AM
link   
a reply to: butcherguy

My mistake. You get the gist though, I'm sure. 92 was significant to me in other ways, oops.



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 09:40 AM
link   
a reply to: butcherguy

They overplay quakes in the media, too. When added up, all the damage is costly, but for most its a few broken things and a scratch or two.

The unfortunate ones die, usually together in a failed structure or, like in Oakland, when the freeway collapsed. More people die in hospitals from cancer and on the hiway in car wrecks by comparison.

For most its a memorable adventure-- where were you, kind of thing. I witnessed the Loma Prieta Quake in the SF bay Area, it was awesome. Definitely on the bucket list.



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 09:46 AM
link   

originally posted by: SunnyDee
FYI-the last earthquake of any significance was in 1992 in So Cal. 22 years ago. a whole generation of kids here do not even know what all the fuss is about.


Heh, I was actually in vacation there when it happened. I was staying at friend's place and the temporary bed he made for me was under weights for weight lifting. I asked him: "Hey, can I move those dumbells from over there, I feel a little paranoid?."

Good thing I did, on my first morning, that's when the quake hit. I was pretty scared thinking that the Big One was just waiting for me to come visit! Luckily, nothing happened to us but it was a sad day to see so many peoples houses and freeways down to the ground while a lot of the city was in panic.
edit on 7-5-2015 by theMediator because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 09:49 AM
link   

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: butcherguy


Then there are the earthquakes…..

What earthquakes?

Natives don't call the little stuff quakes, we call them, "Did you feel that?" Then theres the next serious level, some stuff fell off shelves, followed by broken glass and car alarm symphony. In the midwest, tornados do that almost every day. Let alone friggin golf ball hail…

The last sixer here was a decade ago…

quaketrack




The list is missing the 7.2 quake of April 10, 2010 in Mexicali. I was living in the Coachella Valley at the time and we were rocked pretty good. Living in SoCal since the mid sixties I've experienced many quakes. That Mexicali quake was one of the most intense I've felt.

God help me I love a good quake.


edit on 5/7/2015 by dezertdog because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 09:51 AM
link   
a reply to: intrptr

Yeah, my husband, then boyfriend, was out for a beer run in SF and watched the cars on the street bounce up and down. He later that night got mugged at screwdriver point! Oh, the memories, but so true that we mostly all just like to talk about where we were.

In 94, we lived on a hillside in in the southland and watch transformers blow(I thought bombs were going off).

Memories, like the corners of my mind...misty water-colored memories....



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 09:56 AM
link   
I lived here all my life, I have witnessed the ebb and flow of water and heard all the arguments. I don;t have time to link, others can do their own research.,

California's primary water source is the runoff every year from Sierra Nevada snow pack. The aquifers under the state are huge. No matter how much it rains or snows the reservoirs and storage capacity in California is fixed. As far as I know thy aren't building any more damns. Once full the rest runs off to the ocean, some replenishes the aquifers.

All the people in California use less than 10 percent of the available water, big industry has increased to the point that they are using up all the rest, even tapping and depleting the aquifers. The always limited rain fall and snow run off is not increasing, just the overuse.

The drought isn't because it rains less nowadays, its because big industrial corporations and farms are taking an increasing larger share for themselves.

Cut back the water intense farming and industry and the state will enjoy as much water as it always has, regardless of population.



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 10:04 AM
link   
a reply to: intrptr
I am not disagreeing with you, but as far as I can see, industry and farming has diminished in our state, not grown. Which industries are sucking up all the water, other than ag?

The last 4 years have been dry and warmer than usual, that I can see for myself. The 4 years prior were heading that direction. It's about time for a new pattern!




top topics



 
21
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join