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Bill C-51 Passes in House of Commons

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posted on May, 6 2015 @ 08:44 PM
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Article here

I'm actually surprised that I haven't seen many of my fellow Canadian ATSers discussing this troubling piece of legislature. The bill allows for a massive boost in the powers exercised by the Canadian Security Intelligence Service. Alarmingly, this includes things such as:

- Greater ability to access and store communication
- More no-fly list powers
- RCMP can now restrict movements of suspects and extend incarceration under the guise of "preventative" detention
- Interfere/Cancel banking transactions
- Covertly disrupt "radical" websites
- Can charge someone with the crime of "encouraging" terrorist attacks

The major concern is with the possibility of abuse. There have been rumblings that the Harper government in particular would like to use this as a method of thwarting his detractors and critics. That there will be a very thin and blurred line between who the government sees as an activist/protestor versus a terrorist.




posted on May, 6 2015 @ 09:15 PM
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originally posted by: MonkeyFishFrog
Article here

I'm actually surprised that I haven't seen many of my fellow Canadian ATSers discussing this troubling piece of legislature. The bill allows for a massive boost in the powers exercised by the Canadian Security Intelligence Service. Alarmingly, this includes things such as:

- Greater ability to access and store communication
- More no-fly list powers
- RCMP can now restrict movements of suspects and extend incarceration under the guise of "preventative" detention
- Interfere/Cancel banking transactions
- Covertly disrupt "radical" websites
- Can charge someone with the crime of "encouraging" terrorist attacks

The major concern is with the possibility of abuse. There have been rumblings that the Harper government in particular would like to use this as a method of thwarting his detractors and critics. That there will be a very thin and blurred line between who the government sees as an activist/protestor versus a terrorist.



The Anti-Terrorism Act, also known as Bill C-51, easily passed third reading by a margin of 183 to 96, thanks to the Conservative government's majority and the promised support of the third-party Liberals.


I guess we need to know who the 96 are, the rest are traitors. We pay these assclowns to work in our best interests, they are not delivering what they are supposed to, so I think it's time to fire them all. We can try to vote them out I suppose, but since elections are pretty much rigged, I don't think that is going to do a lot of good.

Cheers - Dave



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 09:22 PM
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not that the shower of cretins in my gov are much better but wow just wow!
is Canada becoming the 4th reich?

all this law being enacted across the western so called free world in the name of countering
terrorism is seriously worrying there has to be a reason that's not clear yet to us
as to why all this is happening its almost like we are getting set up to deal with
a huge future event that requires a state of almost marshal law across the world?



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 11:16 PM
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a reply to: bobs_uruncle

I agree. There are only 96 honorable members of the House of Commons. I don't see the need for an expansion on the already existing powers and protections of CSIS. We've thwarted almost every single (alleged) terror threat except the Parliament Hill shooting. Even though the PHS was tragic, it does not warrant such extreme measures.



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 01:30 AM
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Was this another Bill passed at 03.30 in the morning with nobody awake to disagree..
edit on AM4Thu20151972 by andy1972 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 03:04 AM
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This is what happens when you have 73 year olds deciding how the world should work. A world they no longer understand or actually contribute to.

Yes. Please make decisions with regard to the Internet when you can barely figure out how to access your email without direct links on your desktop (tangent, I apologize)

I wish Canadians would care more. I'd say 1/25 have actually heard of c-51. As long as people can still watch Saturday Night Hockey and Tim Hortens doesn't raise their prices, no one gives a ____.

My city had more people vote on Facebook for an arena upgrade than the past four mayoral elections combined. But, they are too stupid to realize if they vote for the right candidate there is a higher chance of getting those arena upgrades.


edit on 7-5-2015 by bluetrees because: Need more rantiness



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 12:46 PM
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a reply to: bluetrees

Too true. Lately, it seems Canadians have become quite apathetic to our own politics. Only 61% of the eligible population voted in the last federal election. Harper has ran the government as his own private ball pit making decisions about the country and forcing a media blackout so that we don't know what's going on. He needs to be ousted in the upcoming election but that is going to be tough too. Originally, I was going to break with my staunch support of the NDP to vote for Trudeau but after finding out he supported this bill, I am probably going to be voting NDP.

We need an overhaul on our parties too. Feels like we are not voting for our ideal pick, but the lesser of three evils.



posted on May, 7 2015 @ 09:40 PM
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originally posted by: MonkeyFishFrog
a reply to: bobs_uruncle

I agree. There are only 96 honorable members of the House of Commons. I don't see the need for an expansion on the already existing powers and protections of CSIS. We've thwarted almost every single (alleged) terror threat except the Parliament Hill shooting. Even though the PHS was tragic, it does not warrant such extreme measures.


Just to show you how ridiculous CSIS is, do an FOIA request for your own information, what they know about you. All it costs is $5 and the price of a stamp. Just don't be surprised when they start listing off statues involving national security. I know, I did it and you'd think from the statutes they listed that I was Dr. Evil or maybe the guy who gave Satan evil lessons. LOL

Cheers - Dave



posted on May, 8 2015 @ 12:20 AM
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a reply to: bobs_uruncle

Now I'm kind of curious as to what kind of, if any, file they have on me. I would think some of my posts on this website are filled with flag words.



posted on May, 8 2015 @ 11:10 AM
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originally posted by: MonkeyFishFrog
a reply to: bobs_uruncle

Now I'm kind of curious as to what kind of, if any, file they have on me. I would think some of my posts on this website are filled with flag words.


Well, I know they have a file on me. In my FOIA request for information on myself they used 9 statutes involving national security. Some of which involved failure of the government's ability to function if my info was released. I find it comical because I am not sure if this is a blanket FOIA response or specific to my past with the military and foreign governments. There is government criminal activity as well as malfeasance and criminal negligence that I know of directly (I was a whistleblower), unfortunately it is buried by injunctions (superior court gag orders).

Cheers - Dave



posted on May, 8 2015 @ 01:41 PM
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Sad times.

In the past 6 months or so, France, Australia and New Zealand have also enacted similar legislation.



posted on May, 8 2015 @ 05:23 PM
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I don't get why we are allowing these kinds of legislation through. Are people becoming that complacent and naive?



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