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Ancestry.com Caught Sharing Customer DNA Data With Police With No Warrant

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posted on May, 5 2015 @ 11:11 PM
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admin note: at the request of Ancestry.com and based on their statement the story quoted here is "factually incorrect" the following statement from an Ancestry.com spokesperson is added:


The genetic information provided by our DNA customers is personal and we have strict standards in place to protect their identities and the integrity of their data. These standards are our first priority. On occasion when required by law to do so, and in this instance we were, we have cooperated with law enforcement and the courts to provide only the specific information requested but we don’t comment on the specifics of cases.



Ancestry.com Caught Sharing Customer DNA Data With Police With No Warrant


Idaho Falls, Idaho – Would you find it frightening— perhaps even downright Orwellian — to know that a DNA swab that you sent to a company for recreational purposes would surface years later in the hands of police? What if it caused your child to end up in a police interrogation room as the primary suspect in a murder investigation?

cont...



“This risk will increase further as state and local law enforcement agencies begin to use Rapid DNA analyzers—portable machines that can process DNA in less than an hour. These machines will make it much easier for police to collect and analyze DNA on their own outside a lab. Currently, because forensic DNA analysis in a lab takes so long, we generally see its use limited to high-level felonies like rape and murder. However, Rapid DNA manufacturers are now encouraging local police agencies to analyze DNA found at the scene of low-level property crimes. This means much more DNA will be collected and stored, often in under-regulated local DNA databases. And, because most of the forensic DNA found at property crime scenes is likely to be touch DNA—this only increases the risk that people will be implicated in crimes they didn’t commit.” -The Electronic Frontier Foundation.


Source



This database, called Sorenson , which Ancestry.com owns, while promising customers it would not be shared outside of their research, shared DNA with local police without warrant or court order.

With the subject of more and more privacy taken away another medium is being hijacked. Putting this out as a warning, as many have ordered a test for family background to medical history(used to be available), tests as well as a warning to those interested. Shame that what some thought that could lead to potential abuses has actually come to fruition with this company's breech in privacy.

Related threads:
DNA database
www.abovetopsecret.com...


edit on 5-5-2015 by dreamingawake because: (no reason given)

edit on 5-6-2015 by Springer because: Added per Ancestry.com request




posted on May, 5 2015 @ 11:14 PM
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Hopefully any regular lawyer could get charges made based on warrant less evidence thrown out of court.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 11:15 PM
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This is my surprised face.

:-|

(Not surprised)



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 11:30 PM
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Ancestory dot com is owned by a Mormon corp and is used to track lineage to modern decendants for the purpose of the Mormon church to do baptisms for the dead.

If you used it you and your ancestors have been baptized by a proxy Mormon.

It is part of there must do as a Mormon in order to get to their celestrial heaven.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 11:32 PM
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a reply to: dreamingawake

A while back I posted about this same thing, companies are coming out with all kind of ways to get DNA from people willingly, because that for now is the only way to get it, the big DNA data banks that governments wants is no working so good.

So sorry but if you give away your DNA willingly you are not longer owner of that sample, they pretty much can do anything they want and even sell it if the want.



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 12:03 AM
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ancestry dot come is a joke, and scam. The only info they have on my surname is info that I put on there and when I do a search for my surname they want to CHARGE me for that info, that I put on there.



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 12:13 AM
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Thanks for the comments. Honestly wouldn't trust any of the services. If one can privately have a test done(very expensive I'm sure), then compare it to the data charts on sites-such as halo-groups-, would be safer anyway. Unfortunately though, seems to be how this works anymore, give the beneficial technology but take away rights because we're wiling to give it.

Sorry not sure if the site would have to do with any advertising on this site but I do agree it's pretty scam worthy. If anyone wants to look up data on family, take advantage of a free trial and make sure to cancel after that time.



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 12:39 AM
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This is almost (well, maybe definately) funny. You (or someone) actually sent a DNA sample into an online site? WOW!! LOL!.

Seriously, don’t do that again...
You never know if serial killing might someday seem like a sensible and easy way to relieve family stress. It’s too late now, though; you might as well go ahead and cross that one off your list. Remember, try to look ahead and never limit your options.

Seriously seriously, privacy is an endangered species. What little we have left will soon be gone. We’ve decided to scarifice it for the love of gadgets. Privacy is such a small price to pay for that cool new Apple watch, or that hot, fashionable VR headgear on sale. Christ, who wouldn’t be willing to share their most private, intimate moments for a free 6 month subscription to that horny, new adult website everyone’s been talking about? All they want is a semen sample? No problem. Personally, though, I’m gonna tough it out until they put that new toaster on the market. You know the one: it will also sing songs to you, take photos, make videos, tell you your horoscope, do your laundry, and speak/respond to you in 38 languages? When that baby hits the market, the last skeleton in my closet comes out!

I hate to say it, but the Privacy Train is barrelling down the mountain, and someone has cut the brakeline. We’re done for!! I think privacy is becoming a non-issue. We, the sheeple, have willingly given it up, and it’s too late now to turn back. The technology beast has grown too big to handle, and it just keeps getting bigger and more hungry every day.

Sorry, dreamingawake, If I seem to be taking it all too lightly. It’s not that I don’t understand the ramifications of all this. It’s also not that I minimize the desire we all have for some level of privacy in our lives. Personally, the idea of my privacy being stolen from me without my express permission really pisses me off. But, I can read the writing on the wall, and it clearly states to me that I’m screwed. I’m afraid it’s too late to unscramble that egg...



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 12:45 AM
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My brother set up a family account there. When he was stationed in Lakenheath AFB in England, he did a thorough family search going back 3-4 generations on both our grandfather's side, who was born in England, and our grandmother, who was born in Budapest. My grandmother died a Catholic, and no matter what the Mormons do, she will stay one, as far as I'm concerned. I get that they have their religion, but in my religion, you CANNOT change someone's religion after death that they themselves chose. You won't be able to convince me otherwise. It's bad enough my grandmother is rolling in her grave because I'm not Catholic, I'm non-Denominational, let's let the poor woman's ghost deal with one religious heresy at a time. LOL



On topic, I think we are pushing it a step too Orwellian, if you ask me. Then again, every day it seems we move that boundary ever closer to the point where we just won't question it after a time. Hopefully some good lawyer can get this thrown out, then again, we have the Supreme Court telling cops now they don't need a warrant for our phones and our web history, so what's not to stop them from saying this is ok for the cops as well?



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 02:24 AM
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a reply to: netbound

Thank GOD for people like you. You are too funny,but spot on.



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 05:25 AM
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a reply to: dreamingawake

I have an absolute horror about people giving away their dna. It seems to be the mirror into their souls for want of a better way of putting it. You are letting someone somewhere you have never met or granted the privilege of looking into your whole background, disease possibilities etc etc. Its way too much information to trust to anyone. It also is a weapon of information to an enemy for biological warfare.

I see it as a very serious thing - after the damn horse has bolted. In the UK we had the police going into schools and amusing the little ones by taking samples of their dna without parents permission or knowledge until after the event.

I believe this has been stopped now, and with the propensity of scientists, politicians and police for leaving their computers on trains and god knows elsewhere, this information is way too easily available to the untrustworthy.

I hope it can be made a Human Rights issue for the Court to stop this as its far more dangerous I suspect than people think and they are already aware of how it can affect personal health insurance.



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 07:04 AM
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I can understand the curiosity. In our modern world, we all move so far away from family. I have relatives in Peru that I will never meet, but I was able to connect with them through a DNA ancestry service.

I guess my advice would be to weigh the benefits of knowing more about your past versus handing Big Brother your genome. It no different than fingerprinting your kids at the mall because you are worried about child abductions. Once you hand over the data, you lose all control.



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 07:10 AM
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originally posted by: ChesterJohn
Ancestory dot com is owned by a Mormon corp and is used to track lineage to modern decendants for the purpose of the Mormon church to do baptisms for the dead.

If you used it you and your ancestors have been baptized by a proxy Mormon.

It is part of there must do as a Mormon in order to get to their celestrial heaven.


Annnnd if they wanna do their zombie bath, fine. I care not, doesn't actually affect anything. Now sharing private info with the Gesta..err, police, that I have much more issue with.



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 09:50 AM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

SOURCE please?



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 09:59 AM
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Since bloodlines seem to be very important to the elite, it's crossed my mind if Ancestry.com might be funded in some way to monitor these bloodlines. Maybe that theory is the result of one too many glasses of "koolaide" !

I have also heard that the Mormons have an agenda to archive all the humans on Earth, with the purpose of making sure they all go to "Heaven"....actually kind of "nice" thing depending on your perspective. An Ancient Alien theory might be that the Mormon religion was founded by a race of Aliens who's agenda is to help mankind in some way....I'll tell you Mormons are some of the nicest people you'll ever meet in my experience.

Certainly no surprise why this type of data base would be desired by " law enforcement ", scientists and researchers, the elites and the "Aliens" !! LOL

Seriously, what this tells me is that our DNA is very special or at least important to our understanding of Human behaviors and origins in some way. For myself any curiosity I might have about my Ancestry would never be worth turning over my DNA to this kind of website, for the very reasons the OP has pointed out.



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 10:05 AM
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Didn't anyone notice how much advertising money this start-up was spending without any customers or even an existing market to break into. I remember seeing commercials in 2012 think "I feel sorry for whoever is hemorrhaging money on this, do they think this is going to be the next Facebook? Good luck"

Turns out they are going to be like Facebook. Not in popularity and time spent but they both collect information on users for profiling. It seems that information is worth a great deal to the intelligence community. That is how Facebook, with a saturated market and no new users to sign up, is still worth money.



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 10:08 AM
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a reply to: dreamingawake

I remember a time, late 90s I think, when getting your children DNA swabbed and fingerprinted for the Child ID program was all the rage. The purpose was to make finding your lost, kidnapped ,missing child easier to find. At the time, I recall thinking how easy it would be for that info to be misused for the rest of their lives. I even thought about litigation in the future against parents estranged from children who had this done as the child had no voice in giving up their DNA.

Fast forward to today.

Gotcha.



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 12:22 PM
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Sketchyyyy.

Where there is potential for corruption by TPTB, you better believe it's being corrupted.


a reply to: dreamingawake




posted on May, 7 2015 @ 07:43 PM
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From the Ancestry.com privacy statement:

6. Can my DNA information ever be disclosed without my consent?

Generally no. But there are some very limited circumstances where your DNA test results could be disclosed to third parties without your express consent. For example:
As may be required by law with regulatory and law enforcement authorities;

Personally, I think they probably did share it with law enforcement.



posted on May, 8 2015 @ 10:14 AM
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a reply to: dreamingawake

They seem to get our information one way or the other,when I heard that ancestry was doing dna I was automatically suspicious there is no privacy anymore... not to go off topic but the other day I was watching the real housewives of New York in one scene an owner of a dry cleaners cleaners to the rich and famous had a new side line business introducing rfid chips into clothing to track the cleaning methods I was floored to say the least .



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