It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

B-52 Dragon's Eye

page: 1
4

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 5 2015 @ 07:55 PM
link   
In April of last year a B-52 from Barksdale flew, first with a simulator, and later with an active AN/ASQ-236 Dragon's Eye AESA radar pod mounted on the external weapons pylon. Dragon's Eye was originally intended for the F-15E Strike Eagle, but has been proven to work on the B-52 as well. It allows for the ability to locate points of interest, and perform surveillance in all conditions.

If the system is eventually incorporated into the B-52, it will provide an advantage to aircraft operating in the PACAF AO. It will greatly improve their ability for maritime surveillance, with an already long loiter time.


As demand increases to find innovative ways to support mission requirements in a resource-constrained environment, Air Force Global Strike Command is looking to enhance its warfighting capabilities from within.

As the nation’s long-range strike force provider, the command is currently working to improve capabilities available to combatant commanders around the globe by incorporating off-the-shelf technology into its strategic bombers.

Recently, AFGSC’s Bomber Requirements Division led a successful demonstration of the AN/ASQ-236 “Dragon’s Eye,” a podded active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar, on a B-52 Stratofortress. Originally fielded for operational use on the F-15E Strike Eagle in 2009, Dragon’s Eye was developed to provide aircrew with the ability to geo-locate points of interest, and conduct surveillance activities day or night, in adverse weather conditions.

“The Dragon’s Eye enhances the B-52’s ability to operate in both contested environments and adverse weather conditions,” Maj. Brett Plummer, AFGSC B-52 Requirements Branch chief, said. “The radar’s high resolution mapping enables target detection, tracking and subsequent engagement in situations where our existing electro-optical targeting pods cannot.”

globalaviationreport.com...




posted on May, 5 2015 @ 08:05 PM
link   
I live about 15 miles from BAFB....It's great to see those old birds still flying.

Talk about bulletproof, they just keep upgrading them.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 08:07 PM
link   
a reply to: Signals

They were the most reliable aircraft to come through when I was on the ramp. I can count on one hand the number of times they slipped a departure, and that was usually because of crew duty after a minor problem, since we were so far from pretty much everywhere.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 08:14 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

It's funny to see the "humidity indicator" on your link....yeah, it's about 100% here in La..

I hope they finally get approval for new engines.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 08:18 PM
link   
a reply to: Signals

GE has put forward a proposal that would add almost no strain on the aircraft, which is the big reason they haven't yet. When they did the modeling for it, the bigger engines chopped something like a third off the fatigue life of the wings. The GE proposal though is for a 1-1 replacement, using engines that are about a thousand pounds lighter dry weight, add about a thousand pounds in thrust, and have about a significant fuel burn improvement.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 08:25 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58


My dad began in the AF as a gunner on the those birds. I will ALWAYS be a B-52 fan. He eventually retired as a Senior Master Sergeant. He has tons of lithographs, pictures, you name it us kids have gotten him over the years as gifts to decorate his walls with. LOL May those birds fly high for as long as possible!










posted on May, 5 2015 @ 08:27 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Signals

GE has put forward a proposal that would add almost no strain on the aircraft, which is the big reason they haven't yet. When they did the modeling for it, the bigger engines chopped something like a third off the fatigue life of the wings. The GE proposal though is for a 1-1 replacement, using engines that are about a thousand pounds lighter dry weight, add about a thousand pounds in thrust, and have about a significant fuel burn improvement.



That would be cool if they could do that. It would certainly help. Keep us posted!




posted on May, 5 2015 @ 08:31 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

here's a cool hi-res with the pod


edit on 5/5/2015 by howmuch4another because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 08:32 PM
link   
a reply to: Anyafaj

The current plan has them flying until something like 2040. They're going to be almost 100 years old when they're retired.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 08:33 PM
link   
a reply to: howmuch4another

I'd hate to be in that position, taking that picture. An aircraft at Tinker, undergoing depot level maintenance last year took off, and those inboard flaps decided they were going to quit and walk out.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 08:38 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Oh snap! Look out below! That would put a nice sized hole in that humongous hanger they have there. I noticed it was mentioned in your link the upgraded maritime capabilities. That is what I remember last year being the biggest deal. Eye's on the open ocean with long range and loiter able to ident for strike AC from the Carriers or STS from cruisers. IT is a big upgrade.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 08:48 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Anyafaj

The current plan has them flying until something like 2040. They're going to be almost 100 years old when they're retired.


I still remember almost 42 years later, when I was 3, I thought when a B-52 flew over our house it was dropping cheese off. Don't ask me how I came up with this, I was a very weird kid. As soon as I heard the bird, I'd run to the fridge to check if our cheese had been refilled. Ahh memories! LOL I'll be 70 when they retire my bird. Sad.



Maybe I'll throw a retirement party for her. LOL


edit on 5/5/2015 by Anyafaj because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 08:53 PM
link   
There's also talk of putting an internally mounted AESA radar to replace the APQ-166 mounted in the nose. That's the original radar installed, and the last upgrade to them was in the 80s. They've tried twice to replace them, unsuccessfully. Maybe the third time is the charm. This time they're looking at the B-1 for an AESA radar too, so maybe they'll both get them and bring costs down.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 09:03 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Anyafaj

The current plan has them flying until something like 2040. They're going to be almost 100 years old when they're retired.


I still remember almost 42 years later, when I was 3, I thought when a B-52 flew over our house it was dropping cheese off. Don't ask me how I came up with this, I was a very weird kid. As soon as I heard the bird, I'd run to the fridge to check if our cheese had been refilled. Ahh memories! LOL I'll be 70 when they retire my bird. Sad.



Maybe I'll throw a retirement party for her. LOL




posted on May, 5 2015 @ 10:39 PM
link   
we need spaceships with that sort of service life.



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 01:06 AM
link   
I see them in Charleston, beautiful birds.



posted on May, 6 2015 @ 02:59 AM
link   
Good to hear about the pod and the engines...

She contributed to my back problems, but she was my first and will always have a special place in my heart.

Physically demanding to work on but so very reliable.



new topics

top topics



 
4

log in

join