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Astronomers find great big planet orbiting tiny little star

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posted on May, 4 2015 @ 08:58 AM
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Scientists from the Research School of Astrophysics and Astronomy in Australia have spotted a new exoplanet, which wouldn’t usually be huge news. After all, astronomers have identified more than 1800 planets orbiting alien suns in the last few decades. What sets this one apart is that it’s very large, and the star it’s orbiting is unusually small and dim. This discovery could actually change our understanding of how planets form. This planet in question is a gas giant known as HATS-6b, and it orbits (predictably) a star called HATS-6. It orbits very close to the star, making it what’s known as a “hot Jupiter.” However, it’s not too terribly hot in this case — HATS-6 is not a sun-like star.

Astronomers find great big planet orbiting tiny little star




Came across this article on one of the tech sites i frequent and thought it may be of interest. Always fascinating to discover how these exoplanets are discovered.

This particular world seems to raise so interesting questions as to how planetary bodies form and it seems could be quite enlightening regarding future exoplanet discovery around similar type stars.




posted on May, 4 2015 @ 09:10 AM
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a reply to: andy06shake

WoW, neat…


It also orbits its tiny parent star every 3.3 Earth days.

Wait, what?



posted on May, 4 2015 @ 09:14 AM
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a reply to: andy06shake

Or they can be completely wrong and will later report it is not orbiting that tiny star, as they thought. It may later be reported, the planet is actually under the influence of a much greater planet or star, much further away, in a longer than expected orbit, that can't be seen from our location.

Sound familiar? We really are flying by the seat of our pants. We are guessing at everything we see out there. We are like the proverbial blind men trying to describe an elephant. I applause their efforts, but I take what they say with a grain of salt.



posted on May, 4 2015 @ 09:17 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

The way im reading the article, because of the luminosity of the star and the size of the planet its possible for the HATS-6b satellite to determine more accurate readings. Astonishing the data they can determine considering the system is 500 light years distant. As to the veracity of the information, i really cannot say i just find the article of interest.
edit on 4-5-2015 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 4 2015 @ 09:22 AM
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a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

"We really are flying by the seat of our pants. We are guessing at everything we see out there."

Thats science in a nut shell, end of the day its our best guess based on the information we have, after all we work with the tools we have.

edit on 4-5-2015 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 4 2015 @ 09:29 AM
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a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

Uh... It's definitely orbiting that star. They have calculated how often it does so (3.3 earth days). The star itself is orbiting around the center of the galaxy, just like our star. I mean I see the point you were trying to make, I just feel like it was a poor example.
edit on 4-5-2015 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 4 2015 @ 09:44 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

Uh... It's definitely orbiting that star. They have calculated how often it does so (3.3 earth days). The star itself is orbiting around the center of the galaxy, just like our star. I mean I see the point you were trying to make, I just feel like it was a poor example.


Perhaps my example was poor, however, we are making guesses based on what we think we know and what we think we see.

We are at an extreme disadvantage because we are limited in our viewing abilities. Even with the aide of amazing telescopes, we still have to deal with !imitations of our eyes and our ability to process what we see. The best we can do is make an educated guess.


edit on 4-5-2015 by NightSkyeB4Dawn because: I really do hate posting from a mobile. I refuse to buy another computer.



posted on May, 4 2015 @ 09:46 AM
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a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

Well consider this, we barely understand how our own planet works, let alone the workings of celestial bodies we can't go out and look at.



posted on May, 4 2015 @ 09:59 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

Well consider this, we barely understand how our own planet works, let alone the workings of celestial bodies we can't go out and look at.


I wrote that exact sentiment in the last line of my post, but this crappy little tablet I inherited, dropped it when i tried to transmit.

My days are numbered. I refuse to buy another cell phone or computer.When this device dies, and when I am no longer able to obtain a throw away, when those around me rush to upgrade, I will no longer be surfing the net. I am tried of throwing away money and chasing my tail in an attempt to keep up with the technology, but I digress.

I agree with you 100%. The mysteries below our feet, on !and and sea, abound. There is so much we don't know about this place that is our home.



posted on May, 4 2015 @ 10:07 AM
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originally posted by: NightSkyeB4Dawn
I wrote that exact sentiment in the last line of my post, but this crappy little tablet I inherited, dropped it when i tried to transmit.


Lol, well we agree at least then.


I agree with you 100%. The mysteries below our feet, on !and and sea, abound. There is so much we don't know about this place that is our home.


Yes, we have much to learn.



posted on May, 4 2015 @ 10:35 AM
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By now (500 light years) the large planet's gravitational pull very well could have drawn in the small star to its eventual destiny... may take a few years to find out. if it's orbit is that short, it is very close, or traveling at extreme speed...



posted on May, 4 2015 @ 10:41 AM
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Maybe it was drifting by and was captured.

Rogue Planet



posted on May, 4 2015 @ 10:55 AM
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I believe someone already posted this information not long ago


www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on May, 4 2015 @ 10:57 AM
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a reply to: Ghost147

My bad your correct.

Edit: A bit off topic but the date on my PC somehow says 2nd of May. Dont know whats going on. Weird.


edit on 4-5-2015 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 4 2015 @ 11:27 AM
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a reply to: andy06shake

Not to worry. This thread is on a different topic from that one, as you know. We've both posted in both.



posted on May, 4 2015 @ 11:35 AM
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a reply to: Astyanax

No probs, managed to work out my date issue, turns out i had set the clock back a few days in an attempt to address a GTA V game related issue. LoL



posted on May, 4 2015 @ 12:22 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake


Astonishing the data they can determine considering the system is 500 light years distant.

Yah, that is unique. It isn't a planet they see, its a dimming of the stars light as the (object) occludes the light from that star.

The apparent decrease in magnitude is how they determine (guesstimate) the nature (size and density) of the object.

If they are real lucky they might even get a spectral whiff of the atmosphere as it is back lit by the star light. Any change in the spectral lines might reveal more about the 'objects' atmosphere.

Still a big guessing game, though.



posted on May, 4 2015 @ 01:43 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Such is life, simple fact is there are some questions that humanity do not have the tools or perception to understand. Given the grand scheme of things and the scale of our universe is it any wonder that we find ourselves lacking regrading any definitive understanding of our cosmos. Which is not to say we should not attempt to do so given our inherit tenancy to explore.
edit on 4-5-2015 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 4 2015 @ 11:06 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake


Which is not to say we should not attempt to do so given our inherit tenancy to explore.

Seems a waste, unless they aren't informing us about their search. I mean, I know that stars have planets and all. Surely they do, too.

So whats to gain by determining that? We can't a) go there, and b) even see them.



posted on May, 5 2015 @ 05:51 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Somehow i imagine Human ingenuity being what it is, once they do indeed find an Earth 2.0 some kind of viable transportation system will surely follow. As you are probably aware there are quite a few FTL proposals on the drawing board. The problem being most requite negative energy/matter to function.

End of the day through without a instantaneous method of travel, something resembling a wormhole and that circumvents the problems associated with relativity and time dilation. Any journey that we attempt to make to another star will be of the exodus colonization variety simply because from anyone left on Earth's perspective the journey time involved could be 100s if not 1000s of years. That notion kind of retards empire building down to the fact that communication never mind trade would be near impossible without wormholes.
edit on 5-5-2015 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



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