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Sheriff Clarke: Baltimore Cops ‘Offered Up As Human Sacrifices (Interview, Video)

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posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:08 PM
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a reply to: abe froman

YOU seemed to have missed the point, the OP is about the officers being "Human sacrifices".
I know what the OP says and I don't happen to agree with Clarke.


They are alive. Freddie Gray is dead.
Really? I'm gobsmacked. I did not know that.

What does his "day in court" have to do with it? It is not relevant. What is relevant is his death.

edit on 5/3/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



(post by Neutrality removed for a manners violation)
(post by Phage removed for a manners violation)

posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:12 PM
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originally posted by: marg6043
a reply to: abe froman

Sadly as a product of the social injustice going on in many inner cities Mr. Gray had many, many days in court for his 25 years of age.


and that has what to do with anything? people change, wanna know my history and current day situation? I'll pm you.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:13 PM
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originally posted by: abe froman

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: abe froman

Freddie Gray is not accused of a crime.


What were they going to do when they got him to the station?

A) charge him with a crime

B) admit it was a false arrest

C) ice cream party

...sometimes the smartest people say the dumbest things.


False imprisonment is a restraint of a person in a bounded area without justification or consent. False imprisonment is a common-law felony and a tort. It applies to private as well as governmental detention. When it comes to public police, the proving of false imprisonment is sufficient to obtain a writ of habeas corpus.

I am wondering how the officers were charged with False Imprisonment. Looks like they failed to do their paperwork on the charges before throwing him in the van and carting him off. I guess they hadn't figured out what they would make it out to be at that point except it is procedure to have charges before imprisoning someone.

False imprisonment is a felony.
edit on 3-5-2015 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:13 PM
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a reply to: Phage

yep, I forgot a comma, I meant abe wasn't implying Freddy was awaiting a court date, more so he would never see any date.
edit on 3-5-2015 by Neutrality because: (no reason given)


Also, if Freddy was alive, technically he WOULD see court date, as in to testify against the officers that "NEARLY" killed him, so relevance that
NEARLY
edit on 3-5-2015 by Neutrality because: (no reason given)

edit on 3-5-2015 by Neutrality because: suck at editing



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:13 PM
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originally posted by: abe froman

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: abe froman

Freddie Gray is not accused of a crime.


What were they going to do when they got him to the station?

A) charge him with a crime

B) admit it was a false arrest

C) ice cream party

...sometimes the smartest people say the dumbest things.


Ice cream party! Everybody loves a good ice cream social.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:15 PM
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originally posted by: abe froman
a reply to: Snarl

Unfortunately, it seems more and more the cops are just as thuggish as the thugs.


Ahhh ... but don't cops offer the occasional ice cream treat?


Cops and thugs: best to avoid both cliques.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:19 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: abe froman

Freddie Gray is not accused of a crime.

Most plaintiffs aren't.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:22 PM
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a reply to: Neutrality

No, my friend people do not change that fast and most never will, that is why is call social injustice, we are the product of our environments most of the time, some make it some die trying.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:23 PM
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a reply to: marg6043

I didn't say change was overnight. I said it CAN happen.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:27 PM
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a reply to: Neutrality

I know you want to believe that, that people change, some actually do, with a lot of help from family and loves ones, but the truth and records shows, that is very, very hard for some people to get out of the vicious cycle of poverty, unemployment and substance addiction.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:27 PM
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a reply to: abe froman


Most plaintiffs aren't.


Right.
But Freddy Gray is neither a plaintiff or defendant. The plaintiff, in this case, is the state of Maryland.

edit on 5/3/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:30 PM
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a reply to: marg6043

I'm a living example, I don't just believe it.

*All on my own, mostly, just took someone (ONE random person at that) to motivate me to educate myself...
edit on 3-5-2015 by Neutrality because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:31 PM
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originally posted by: marg6043
a reply to: abe froman

Well as records shows he had a warrant that was issue in March 13, if the warrant is still active that is motive for arrest, now, some states have laws that a person in probation can not carry any weapon that will mean that the knife was illegal in his possession

This the link to the warrant.

Now I don't know how many days a warrant can be active.

universalfreepress.com...#



A warrant lasts until
a.) Person is picked up by police
b.) Person appears before the court or makes restitution
or
c.) Judge grants OR and disbands the warrant.
That is the answer to your question.

c almost never happens so...
edit on 2015/5/3 by ldyserenity because: ADD



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:33 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: abe froman


Most plaintiffs aren't.


Right.
But Freddy Gray is neither a plaintiff or defendant. The plaintiff, in this case, is the state of Maryland.

He's dead, he would testify if alive, therefore seeing a day in court, t'was the unintentional point.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:36 PM
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a reply to: Neutrality

Then for that I commend you, and I am truly and honestly happy for you. Is not many success stories that can come forward as living examples.




posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:38 PM
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a reply to: Neutrality



He's dead, he would testify if alive, therefore seeing a day in court, t'was the unintentional point.


Yes, had things been different he may have gone to court for something.
But things aren't different. Things are what they are.

edit on 5/3/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:40 PM
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a reply to: ldyserenity

Thanks, that is good to know, but I thought that he didn't have any warrants at the moment, I knew that he had a record, this is something that can affect some of the charges on the police officers, like I said, I agree that the state attorney jump the bridge and was very hasty in the charges and also the way she addressed the public was geared to appease.

I still wondering how the police attorneys will work out the murder, charges.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:42 PM
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a reply to: marg6043

Just wanted to add in this thread as well, it was shown in a different one that that warrant was also served and the gray released on the 18th so it would not have been active at the the arrest.




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