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Ceres - Bright spot has shadow

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posted on May, 3 2015 @ 10:17 AM
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Ceres High Res photo

Bright spot in question is located far right of image.

High Res TIFF download

Above is a download to an even higher quality image.

Bright Spot - Center

Click above to see crater in question with bright spot. You can't miss it!


I was going through the more recent images taken of Ceres and noticed that as the "bright" spot comes out of the darkness. It has a shadow. Which means this object is elevated to some degree. Then as the angle of the sun becomes more directed at it, a smaller bright spot intensifies in the forefront of the original bright spot.

A DOME?


See image above.

Could we be seeing a shadow behind a dome and a reflection in front created by the sun shining off it?


Pardon my very rough, very quickly created, sketch..

Thoughts?


edit on 3-5-2015 by Triton1128 because: (no reason given)

edit on 3-5-2015 by Triton1128 because: Added images




posted on May, 3 2015 @ 10:29 AM
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The CT in me sees a radio dish just above in the smaller dot (at least in the higher res image)...

Yup, I spent too many hours staring at mars rocks...



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 10:48 AM
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Queue the rock apologists in 3...2...1...





posted on May, 3 2015 @ 10:49 AM
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a reply to: Triton1128

I'm not convinced that is a shadow , to me it looks like the bright spot is in a depression inside the crater and the shadow is more the wall of the depression or hole.
Still and interesting thing though.



edit on 3-5-2015 by gortex because: edit to add pic



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 11:16 AM
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is there a reason for the hexagonal craters ?

some of them almost blatantly so

funbox



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 11:22 AM
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a reply to: Triton1128

If you look closely at the high definition picture you sent you will see that nearly every crater has a supposed "dome" in it. Could be thousands of em but highly unlikely. I wanna believe but looks completely natural to me



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 11:30 AM
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a reply to: rossacus

I understand the visual anomalies you speak of. ( Its created during impact, when the super heated area center of a crater bounces back and solidifies immediately following impact. It creates a bulge or hump )

But what sets this particular crater apart from the rest is the very, very, bright flare up in its center. The composition or reflective surface is much different in this specific spot then nearly any where else on Ceres, or we'd see lens flares popping up all over. That's the object in question. Not the crater being a crater, but whats in its center that so bright?

High Res - Bright spot center

edit on 3-5-2015 by Triton1128 because: (no reason given)

edit on 3-5-2015 by Triton1128 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 11:34 AM
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originally posted by: rossacus
a reply to: Triton1128

If you look closely at the high definition picture you sent you will see that nearly every crater has a supposed "dome" in it. Could be thousands of em but highly unlikely. I wanna believe but looks completely natural to me
If you look at any rocky, exposed body like Ceres or the Moon, you'll see that. It's known as a "central peak". The impact that caused the crater basically liquifies the material at the surface, which then settles into a round crater shape. The peak forms rather the same way as the splashback in the middle of a drop of water hitting a puddle.

Crater info

Water droplet
edit on 3-5-2015 by AshOnMyTomatoes because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 11:37 AM
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originally posted by: Triton1128
a reply to: rossacus

I understand the visual anomalies you speak of. ( Its created during impact, when the super heated area center of a crater bounces back and solidifies immediately following impact. It creates a bulge or hump )

But what sets this particular crater apart from the rest is the very, very, bright flare up in its center. The composition or reflective surface is much different in this specific spot then nearly any where else on Ceres, or we'd see lens flares popping up all over. That's the object in question. Not the crater being a crater, but whats in its center that so bright?

High Res - Bright spot center
We won't know until new Dawn data starts coming in. As it stands, the public has already been asking this question for months.
edit on 3-5-2015 by AshOnMyTomatoes because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 11:40 AM
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a reply to: AshOnMyTomatoes

I just hope they don't edit, or hide too much if there is in fact, something unique about it.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 11:49 AM
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a reply to: Triton1128
Knowing NASA and their infamous editing room they have already completed it. Would be nice if they divulged all facts



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 11:52 AM
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originally posted by: gspat
The CT in me sees a radio dish just above in the smaller dot (at least in the higher res image)...

Yup, I spent too many hours staring at mars rocks...


I see what you refer to, slightly odd looking. Another odd thing is that in the bright spot of this thread, the 'shadow' being cast is much fainter in depth than other dark spots or shadows, you only need to brighten the picture a little and that 'shadow' is almost imperceptible, maybe the bright spot is translucent allowing some light through, or deflecting some of the light round the sides.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 11:53 AM
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a reply to: Triton1128

I thought it was some structure initially a few months ago but once I read about salt crystals etc etc and learnt how craters a re formed my initial thoughts started to dissappate. I agree with you that the reflection of light is highly interesting but the shadows you refer to I attribute to the impact "bulge". This is 1 time I really wish I was wrong though..for mankind's sake



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 11:56 AM
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a reply to: smurfy
If the object is reflective in nature, then the shadow would be different in that area compared to other crater shadows, for obvious reasons



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 12:06 PM
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originally posted by: rossacus
a reply to: smurfy
If the object is reflective in nature, then the shadow would be different in that area compared to other crater shadows, for obvious reasons


That's what I am saying already, however it is still odd in a place where there is no atmosphere, no refraction, our Moon's centre of crater uplifts are unambiguous, with their shadows easily defined no matter how much light there is. No uplift, no shadow.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 12:23 PM
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a reply to: smurfy
Fair point but you have to remember when comparing to our moon there is 2 sources of light.the sun and the reflected sunlight off the earth so will have more defined shadows as a result, especially with over lapping. Also I'm not sure if earth's gravity may have a par to play with the structure of the craters, density etc etc



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 12:25 PM
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Think i need the science brigade to help me understand this one, especially for the more hexagonal craters



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 01:31 PM
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Several points to make. The amazingly super luminous bright spot isn't. Ceres is a very dark object, and the cameras have the exposure properly set to photograph the surface. Anything much brighter will appear overexposed (meaning white).

Secondly that's not a shadow. It's the result of sharpening the image before resizing it - thereby amplifying the effect.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 01:59 PM
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originally posted by: Triton1128
Ceres High Res photo

Bright spot in question is located far right of image.

High Res TIFF download

Above is a download to an even higher quality image.

Bright Spot - Center

Click above to see crater in question with bright spot. You can't miss it!


I was going through the more recent images taken of Ceres and noticed that as the "bright" spot comes out of the darkness. It has a shadow. Which means this object is elevated to some degree. Then as the angle of the sun becomes more directed at it, a smaller bright spot intensifies in the forefront of the original bright spot.

A DOME?


Nope, a column of ice.

Which back in January is kinda what I predicted and posted in the Space Exploration forum on ATS here.


My educated guess is that they will find Ceres has spots where liquid water from below the surface has oozed up and frozen.


And then I posted this back in March also on the Space Exploration forum here on ATS:


Imagine for a moment that at the core of Ceres there are radioactive elements such as thorium, uranium, etc in a large concentrations. It might be possible that a deep liquid water layer could exist. Now imagine that an impact (which created the crater the bright spots are seen in) broke the crust of Ceres to the point that there is a fissure going down to that deep liquid water layer. Being that this liquid water is highly salty its freezing point would be lower.

Now imagine that over time it freezes on the surface inside this crater, and a little more is added in a steady, constant trickle. In Ceres's low gravity, over the course of millions of years a giant ice tower could be jutting up from the surface and catching the light above the rim of the crater.

That's my theory anyway.


I'm fascinated by the possibilities but I am pretty certain these will be ice related.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 02:04 PM
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originally posted by: rossacus
a reply to: Triton1128
Knowing NASA and their infamous editing room they have already completed it. Would be nice if they divulged all facts


Why would NASA edit out anything? If you honestly believe this then:

a) You'd never have seen spots in the first place.

b) There would have been no press conference in which mission scientists invited reporters to guess at what they are before the mystery was resolved with closer imagery.



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