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Heavy Situation Just Went Down

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posted on May, 3 2015 @ 10:30 AM
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a reply to: skunkape23

That's messed up, man. Are you okay? At least it was just truck parts in your yard and not bodies or body parts.




posted on May, 3 2015 @ 11:21 AM
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originally posted by: MysterX
a reply to: pfishy

Makes you wonder how emergency people handle it doesn't it?

I bet many of them have symptoms of PTSD or similar...or they are perhaps made of sterner stuff than most people?

Either way, they must have seen and experienced terrible things.

You certainly have to be cut from a very specific cloth to be an emergency responder.
And, as a side note, my mother is a nurse. And she truly loves every single one of her patients. I don't know that I could do that. But, to complicate matters, she is a Hospice nurse. Every patient she meets is in the process of dying. And it's her job to help them do it as peacefully as possible. I wouldn't last six months doing her job. I'd either have a complete breakdown, or I'd off myself.She's been doing it for 20 years, and wouldn't do anything else. It's her calling. I have no idea where she gets the strength for that. She's not callous or detatched. She's the polar opposite of uncaring.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 11:26 AM
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I'm wondering, OP, how are you doing now?
You okay?

My husband and I once witnessed a terrible car crash right in front of us, around a bend two cars going top speed ran into each other and one car flew into the air turning around and around, and landed upside down on the railing of a bridge. It all happened so fast, it was very confusing to try to explain to the officers after.

The car upside down on the railing, and a girl hanging out upside down, over a canyon far below. She was screaming, in shock. I went to the drivers side and the car was squashed down flat- I knew the driver had to be pulverized. I tried talking to the woman hanging out, telling her to not move... I asked if there were others in the car, she could not respond clearly, only wiggle and scream. We tried to stop the cars coming from each direction, calling emergency services. I remember I was so shaken up, I was in shock myself and could only shake and cry afterwards.

Turned out they were two young women, with a little girl. The driver and the little girl died on impact. It still haunts me to this day because from what we could see, it was not their fault. There was a young man speeding and trying to pass everyone, who was passing someone on that bend, on the wrong side of the road, who ran into them. He walked away, and the police didn't pay attention to our description of what he had been doing, preferring to put it down as if they had made some mistake themselves, period.

I hope you are coping with the shock okay!



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 12:23 PM
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I hope you're ok man. I'm currently a firefighter / paramedic so I know exactly how this stuff can bother you. Trauma is not normal, and many cases of trauma are complete chaos. It is out of the norm so it is difficult to cope with this stuff.
My worst was a car that ran off the road and hit a tree. 2 year old girl in her carseat and mothers legs were pinned under the dash so she couldn't move. They were on the phone with 911 when the car caught on fire. They died while on the phone with our dispatcher. When we got there it was too late. The details of what happened still bother me.

Go cry. It makes you no less of a man to cry. I cry alot of times on my way home. I usually feel much better afterwards. I wish I could help more, but its just one of those things. Hold your family tighter today.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 12:26 PM
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I view the dead as being in a better place. At least they (hopefully) died quickly.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 12:37 PM
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a reply to: skunkape23

Feeling for you skunkape. And more so for the families and loved ones.

Angry, illogical cops at the roadside have witnessed these things. If we can accept they will show their pent up emotions we can avoid some of the 'affronted motorist' type confrontations. They dealt with these scenes which enables us to avoid the full trauma. We owe them a debt of understanding.

Cops and medics mentally adjust to these experiences but physically they still go through tremendous stress each time. That stress has an effect which we may feel when a cop acts angry. Put an image in your mind of what he/she has seen when a cop gets angry and you'll find it much easier to ignore that which can be ignored.
edit on 3 5 2015 by Kester because: tense

edit on 3 5 2015 by Kester because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: LoverBoy

Crying removes toxins from the brain. Those who refuse to cry poison themselves.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 01:09 PM
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originally posted by: Kester
a reply to: LoverBoy

Crying removes toxins from the brain. Those who refuse to cry poison themselves.

I try to google some research:
science.howstuffworks.com - Why We Cry: The Truth About Tearing Up...

In fact, one study collected both reflex tears and emotional tears (after peeling an onion and watching a sad movie, respectively). When scientists analyzed the content of the tears, they found each type was very different. Reflex tears are generally found to be about 98 percent water, whereas several chemicals are commonly present in emotional tears [Source: The Daily Journal. First is a protein called prolactin, which is also known to control breast milk production. Adrenocorticotropic hormones are also common and indicate high stress levels. The other chemical found in emotional tears is leucine-enkephalin, an endorphin that reduces pain and works to improve mood. Of course, many scientists point out that research in this area is very limited and should be further studied before any conclusion can be made.

It's all good. I know what you're ssaying. Don't be afraid to express what you're feeling. Don't keep it inside. It's healthy to let it out.
edit on 3-5-2015 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 01:15 PM
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a reply to: jonnywhite

Thanks for the link. Excellent research, much needed.

I don't mean to attack those lucky souls who don't experience extreme trauma and therefore have less need for therapeutic crying.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 02:07 PM
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also thanks for the link.

Skunk ape it's maybe worse than you've seen. Those people, some of them?, aren't going to understand they just died and are gonna be mightly confused. You live physically close and I don't exactly know what to say? Maybe if their families do a small memorial there it will help them understand they have crossed?

From the little I know, crossed people are aware if first responders are there 'something happened" but don't latch onto them. Suffice it to say I'm a little concerned about you.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 03:22 PM
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originally posted by: MysterX
Is it usual for two trucks to be carrying lots of people?

Our lorries in the UK normally only have the driver and perhaps a driver's mate...that's it, unless there are 100 illegals hiding in the back of course, but it's unusual for lorries to be full of passengers.

How did one of the trucks end up so far off the road into your property...200 feet is a long way for a truck to be thrown, that must have been one hell of an impact.


They were dual cab pickups.
The truck that landed on my property appears to have flipped end over end several times. They must have been going fast.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 07:47 PM
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a reply to: skunkape23

You know what I think skunkape23? I think that you came home drunk last night from that bar, and then you logged onto ATS, and then proceeded to post this blatantly obvious, concocted story.

If I am wrong about my assumptions, then I sincerely apologize. I also wish the best for all those involved. Drink up Johnny! ~$heopleNation



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 08:17 PM
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originally posted by: SheopleNation
a reply to: skunkape23

You know what I think skunkape23? I think that you came home drunk last night from that bar, and then you logged onto ATS, and then proceeded to post this blatantly obvious, concocted story.

If I am wrong about my assumptions, then I sincerely apologize. I also wish the best for all those involved. Drink up Johnny! ~$heopleNation


Right, man. I guess I should have taken pictures and posted them.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 09:00 PM
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My heart goes out to the family members of those who may not have survived.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 09:35 PM
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a reply to: skunkape23

Your story reminds me of some of my own personal experiences witnessing automobile collisions first hand. One in particular still haunts me to this day, even though it was 10 years ago.

I was driving to work and it was maybe late April at around 1300. I still lived with my parents at the time, on the family farm, which was about 30 minutes outside of town. The highway is just a two lane job, with narrow shoulders and has a series of relatively tight curves and steep grades. So I was tooling Westbound at around 50 MPH, but began slowing because one of the steep hills with a hard left was coming up. As I began slowing a little red car blew past me as an incredible speed. No sooner does he disappear around the bend of the hill I am passed by 4 Highway Patrol cars who are traveling just as fast as he was. The all had came up behind me and passed me so quickly and suddenly that I didn't have time to react, slow down and pull over to the shoulder.

No more than 30 seconds had passed as I crested the hill and came around the bend, just in time to see that little red car loose it and impact a telephone pole head on and moments later burst in to flames. It took about 15 more seconds for me to get to the point where all the Highway Patrol were, maybe 25 meters from the impact. They were blocking both lanes and were motioning me to stop. I stopped and had both the windows of my truck down and I # you not I heard the poor bastard screaming and saw him flailing around in the drivers seat.

I jumped out of my truck, ignoring the patrolmen yelling at me to stop and sprinted to the car. I stuck both both of my arms in to the burning car, grabbed the guy at his elbows and pulled.

The next thing I knew I was sitting on my ass, holding in each hand a long slimy section of half-cooked flesh. I had de-gloved the guy from his forearms to his fingers.

I don't remember dropping the skin and scrambling away, but I do remember being on my hands and knees throwing up.

I'll never forget how the older Patrolman's tone of voice when he was talking to me a few minutes later. He said something along the lines of, ''It's a shame when people don't realize that they're already dead.''

I hate to agree with him, but there was nothing that anyone could of done for the guy. He was dead and just didn't know it yet. What made it worse was that I drove past the spot of the accident sometimes several times a day and it took a couple years for anything to grow there. The heat had sterilized the ground, leaving this 10' circle of scorched earth, devoid of any life.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 09:53 PM
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a reply to: skunkape23

A year or so later I witnessed another collision, a head on between a Ford Bronco (one of the large ones from the 90's) and a mid-90's Ford Ranger.

I stopped and ran to the closest vehicle, the Ford Ranger. The driver of it was conscious and ambulatory, so I started running to the Bronco. By the time I got to him he had exited the vehicle and was pointing at the other driver shrieking and crying, "He killed my baby! He killed my baby!"

I jumped in the Bronco through the drivers seat and crawled through it from front to back looking for a kid, but didn't find one. I stared freaking out because I thought that maybe the kid had been ejected. I climbed out and started frantically scanning the area in front of the Bronco looking for the kid and yelling at the older guy to come help me look for his child.

He looked over to me from where he was sitting on the curb and something must of finally clicked in his head. He jogged over to me and after finally getting me to calm down explained that that his #ty, 20 year old Bronco was his 'baby'.

I blew up and called this guy everything but a white man. Looking back on the situation I feel really bad, I know traumatic experiences make people act weird, but for those few moments I was frantically looking for a 'baby' only to find out there wasn't one really upset me.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 10:19 PM
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a reply to: skunkape23
you can pray for them - such events will shake you.Try not to internalize the event view it as the accident it was.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 10:29 PM
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a reply to: Lipton
That is horrible.
I have also witnessed a person burn in a car and was completely helpless to do anything about it.
Some things are just what they are.
I guess they could build automatic fire suppression systems into vehicles, but then they would die of suffocation instead of burning.
I think it is best to drive cautiously and avoid crashing.



posted on May, 3 2015 @ 11:49 PM
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That almost exact thing happened to me except it was a woman in a van I'd swiped as we both tried to miss an idiot driving just sitting sideways on the freeway! It took all my willpower not to slap the woman screaming "my baby!" when it became clear she meant the van!
a reply to: Lipton



posted on May, 4 2015 @ 02:24 AM
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originally posted by: skunkape23
Right, man. I guess I should have taken pictures and posted them.


Well I wasn't asking that, but come to think of it a few pictures of the vehicles before they took them away I wouldn't mind seeing out of curiousity. I understand though.

I've seen a lot of accidents out here in California though. Hey, you mentioned seeing someone trapped in a burning vehicle, what happened? ~$heopleNation



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