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Baltimore has a civilian review board for police??? Who would've guessed?

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posted on May, 1 2015 @ 10:54 AM
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a reply to: Greathouse

Population and wealth distribution absolutely is the crux of the entire urban decay issue. The primary tool that a city has in its warchest to fight it is zoning laws. But there are secondary tools as well. I am not a fan of "imminent domain", but have no issue with someone who leaves a building abandoned and decaying having the building ceased by the city for reclamation of value.

One way I have seen it done: you develop a historical commission (which is an evil unto itself, to be honest) that oversees coding of buildings in the historical zone. Buildings with broken windows, non-functioning electricity, non functioning water...all can be actioned for being outside of the code in the historical zone. The goal would be to make sure that no building is in a condition to put the other buildings at risk (fire code, etc), all buildings are secured (reducing vagrants, etc), and that all buildings are in a condition for use ("the white box", or cleaned and ready to lease for commerce).




posted on May, 1 2015 @ 10:59 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

There is a third way for it to be done. In Northern Kentucky to fight urban blight the cities match restoration funds dollar for dollar so that abandoned buildings can be refurbished.



posted on May, 1 2015 @ 11:03 AM
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a reply to: Greathouse

sure. Or implementing tax abatements for restored buildings.

some cities can fund commercial development via an Economic Development Corporation or a Convention and Visitors Bureau.



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