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Do marijuana prisoners deserve amnesty?

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posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:11 PM
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Here's a no brainer question:
Do marijuana prisoners deserve amnesty?


Since 2012, when voters in Colorado and Washington approved the tax and sale of recreational marijuana, the cognitive dissonance of America's drug penalties has become even more absurd.

Where we once incarcerated people for growing and selling "just a plant," we're now incarcerating people for growing and selling "just a plant" that tens of millions of people can grow and sell legally.


I think most people who know my posting history will already know what MY answer to this question will be, but I'll say it anyways. HELL YES!!!!

Now, you may be thinking, "Why ask this question at all?" Well the article highlights a good point:

In 2010, Congress voted to change federal penalties for crack coc aine with the Fair Sentencing Act. Prior to the law's passage, 5 grams of crack coc aine triggered the same mandatory minimum sentence as 500 grams of powder coc aine. Congress reduced that disparity, from 100-to-1 to 18-to-1, which significantly reduced crack coc aine sentences. But Congress did nothing to change the sentences of the more than 8,000 federal crack prisoners who were locked up when the bill was signed into law.


Now, after reading that paragraph, does anyone think that Congress (I said the question was a no brainer, but we all know that Congress couldn't complete a brain between the whole lot of them, so...) will have an opinion that will mirror you or I? Ok, so eff Congress. The President can still grant clemency. Let's explore that avenue.


In 2014, then-Deputy Attorney General James Cole announced a Justice Department initiative to review the petitions of federal prisoners serving sentences longer than what they'd receive if sentenced today, and to grant clemency to those whose early release would not compromise public safety. The second wave of clemencies granted since the initiative launched included both crack offenders and a single marijuana offender.

But clemency, by its very nature, benefits only a small number of people. Even if President Obama were to grant 2,000 commutations over the next 21 months — an unprecedented number — there are roughly 100,000 drug offenders in federal prison. The vast majority would be left to serve excessively long sentences.


Ugh... Not so great there either. Before we go, the article in question leaves a good point that I emphatically agree with (and probably would have made if the article hadn't).


All drug offenders are getting a raw deal from our criminal justice system. It would be a mistake to say, "Let out the people who sell a drug that I'm comfortable with, and to hell with all the rest." Federal and state legislators need to address bad policies for all drug types, and then establish a clear route to resentencing for pot dealers -- and everybody else.


I've said it once and I'll probably say it a thousand more times, END THE WAR ON DRUGS!
edit on 30-4-2015 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:18 PM
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I agree that they should get amnesty, of course, goes without saying.

However can you imagine the can of worms that could open, with all those whose lives have been negatively affected by having these drug offences on their records? The claims for compensation would probably bankrupt any nation on earth, with perhaps the exception of Holland.




posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:18 PM
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yes and a refund


Open yer wallets.


edit on 30-4-2015 by bullcat because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:20 PM
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a reply to: Jonjonj

It should come out of any politican's pocket that voted to keep marijuana illegal.



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:21 PM
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But then how is the government going to keep all that money?

Without the modern drug laws the judicial system would go bankrupt. They would need to heavily downsize prison populations. Lay off thousands of guards due to population decrease. And have to make up the billions they already don't have.

Or they could keep it illegal, have a healthy prison population, keep fear into the masses, and make more money off of a plant than they ever would with it illegal.

There's just too much for them to loose.



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:21 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Jonjonj

It should come out of any politican's pocket that voted to keep marijuana illegal.


Those politicians work for you, therefore, YOU pay.

It is the government of the people for the people.

Cry all you want, the AMERICAN people ARE ACCOUNTABLE and RESPONSIBLE for their governments actions.

They just turn a blind eye, which is called PASSIVE SUPPORT.



edit on 30-4-2015 by bullcat because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:24 PM
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I would say yes as well. It would depend on the Marijuana charge being the only reason they were in prison though....

If there was a violent action associated with it, then I'd say nope....just drop the drug charge part off the sentence.



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:24 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

Well, to be honest. I think most of the drug offenders in prison got busted for reasons other than using, or holding a personal amount of slightly over a personal amount. A co-worker of mine got caught with '___' and shrooms in his car once, and just got a fine and community service for 6 months.
Most of the people in prison I can bet breached their probation, had existing drug issues, or were selling, or had large amounts with intent to sell. Now i am not saying there are a handful of people in there for just getting screwed by the system, but not all drug users are nice, weed smoking, rave going, people.
edit on 30-4-2015 by strongfp because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:25 PM
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a reply to: bullcat

Whose crying? If these prisoners need compensation, then fine. Do it. Though, I'd be happy with settling with just reduced sentences and expunging of records if the price tag for compensation for 100,000+ people is too high.



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:26 PM
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a reply to: strongfp

Selling large amounts of marijuana is JUST as harmful as smoking a joint and should have the same exact sentence for doing it. Nothing.



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:27 PM
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Let's put it in perspective. If an establishment/person sells cigarettes or alcohol to a minor (both kill by the way), the normal penalty is a fine. You get caught selling marijuana to anyone, which doesn't kill and actually helps in certain ways medically. You go to jail. Yea, definitely makes no sense to me. Let them free with some community service or fines is what I say.



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:27 PM
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Yes, they deserve amnesty. Pot smoking isn't really any worse than drinking and we don't punish that even though we have so many drunk driving deaths and injuries every year.

It's not very bright to make yourself stupid by smoking pot and forgetting everything and zoning out. But you shouldn't be criminalized for making yourself stupid. We don't arrest people for watching dunk dynasty and Honey boo boo.



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:27 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: strongfp

Selling large amounts of marijuana is JUST as harmful as smoking a joint and should have the same exact sentence for doing it. Nothing.


Selling large amounts of marijuana is not illegal now is it?

Therefore, time served, law changed, so should their sentence.



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:27 PM
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originally posted by: Vasa Croe
I would say yes as well. It would depend on the Marijuana charge being the only reason they were in prison though....

If there was a violent action associated with it, then I'd say nope....just drop the drug charge part off the sentence.


Well of course. I'm not advocating releasing people who are in jail for charges in addition to marijuana. I only want charges for marijuana changed.



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:28 PM
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originally posted by: bullcat

originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: strongfp

Selling large amounts of marijuana is JUST as harmful as smoking a joint and should have the same exact sentence for doing it. Nothing.


Selling large amounts of marijuana is not illegal now is it?

Therefore, time served, law changed, so should their sentence.



No it's still pretty illegal. Even in states that have decriminalized marijuana possession, you will get jail time for selling large amounts.



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:28 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t

originally posted by: bullcat

originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: strongfp

Selling large amounts of marijuana is JUST as harmful as smoking a joint and should have the same exact sentence for doing it. Nothing.


Selling large amounts of marijuana is not illegal now is it?

Therefore, time served, law changed, so should their sentence.



No it's still pretty illegal. Even in states that have decriminalized marijuana possession, you will get jail time for selling large amounts.


I don't really understand why America has these issues with nature. It is quite acceptable here to have marijuana.


edit on 30-4-2015 by bullcat because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:31 PM
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originally posted by: bullcat

originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Jonjonj

It should come out of any politican's pocket that voted to keep marijuana illegal.


Those politicians work for you, therefore, YOU pay.

It is the government of the people for the people.

Cry all you want, the AMERICAN people ARE ACCOUNTABLE and RESPONSIBLE for their governments actions.

They just turn a blind eye, which is called PASSIVE SUPPORT.




You have it the other way around. We pay them because it's an elaborate racketeering scheme allowing us to think Americans actually own this money. Try to take that money out and keep it safe on your own because the government that works for you will take it and throw you in jail for money laundering.

The trick is to keep making you think you're in control ,but in reality it's just an illusion.

Seriously you think an ELECTRONIC device CREATED by the GOVERNMENT is really going to truthfully count every ballot without being tampered with?

Come f*ing on.



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:34 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

End the War on Drug, indeed! If Portugal can do it so can we. As far as I know they have not sunk flaming or otherwise into the black abyss, right?



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:38 PM
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a reply to: bullcat

Your guess is as good as mine man...



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 03:38 PM
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The entire justice system needs an overhaul.

You know what is worse than thousands in fines and lawyer fees, as well as loosing your job and being locked up with violent criminals?

This fn electronic records system put into place. This system bars you from decent respectable employment for life, it even stays on record a while after you die.

This, to me is the definition of cruel and unusual punishment, to indirectly take away someones quality of life.

You do the "crime" involving a substance known to be safer than the substance alcohol because they have better lobbying behind them.

Everyone that has fallen into this trap should be paid reparations along with an apology and a clean slate.

It's like a sleezy boardroom group sitting around saying. "Whats popular that we can arrest people for and create endless income from? How can we insure they stay in this system?"



edit on 4 by Mandroid7 because: (no reason given)




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