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New Battery and

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posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 12:12 AM
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a reply to: Grimpachi

Sure.

Last time I used a solar generator, metering was running the diesel generator attached to it.

This is why "green" tech has not become mainstream. They still use fossil fuel as a back up because it is the more reliable tech.

I look forward to the day that alternatives are actually alternatives. It will save the companies I work for a ton of money.




posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 12:20 AM
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a reply to: randomtangentsrme

I see you didn't comprehend it.



Or maybe I answered the wrong part of your question, but it is obvious there was a breakdown in communication somewhere.


Oh well.
edit on 30-4-2015 by Grimpachi because: durp



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 12:41 AM
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a reply to: Grimpachi

Metering from my experience for rechargeable large batteries low voltage (AKA car batteries) is utilizing fossil fuels. In the broadest sense this is akin to your alternator recharging your car battery while you run on gasoline.

I do not think there is a breakdown of communication. I think there might be a disagreement of terms, or perhaps a disagreement of overall power distribution, or power generation.



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 01:07 AM
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a reply to: randomtangentsrme

Well, that is why I provided a link that explained it.

People can charge their batteries from any energy source whether it is the grid, solar, or wind. If it was the grid they would do so at times of day when the energy cost is the lowest and at the time of day that it was the highest they would sell that same electric back to the power companies for a profit. If they have solar or wind maybe even a combination of both they would sell their excess maybe even deplete their batteries some during the times when energy is the highest by selling their energy to companies for a profit.

Those batteries would make it possible since they store up to two days of 10-kilowatt-hour electric giving them plenty of storage and capability to turn a profit by selling electric as well as storing their own.

There is more in the link provided talking about alternating during peak and off-peak hours with the battery backup.



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 01:47 AM
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originally posted by: Grimpachi
a reply to: randomtangentsrme

Well, that is why I provided a link that explained it.

People can charge their batteries from any energy source whether it is the grid, solar, or wind. If it was the grid they would do so at times of day when the energy cost is the lowest and at the time of day that it was the highest they would sell that same electric back to the power companies for a profit. If they have solar or wind maybe even a combination of both they would sell their excess maybe even deplete their batteries some during the times when energy is the highest by selling their energy to companies for a profit.

Those batteries would make it possible since they store up to two days of 10-kilowatt-hour electric giving them plenty of storage and capability to turn a profit by selling electric as well as storing their own.

There is more in the link provided talking about alternating during peak and off-peak hours with the battery backup.



A simple US house circuit is 15 amps max kwh.
Amps times volts equals watts. 110v (house hold voltage) x 15 amps = 1650, at 120 v =1800w
10KWH, is basically 6 house plugs not including your dryer or stove or water heater, all usually 240 not 120 v.

10kwh is great for a house back up assuming you have the proper power distribution. Not as great as the day to day work horse.



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 01:53 AM
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a reply to: Thisisfun2015

Wouldn't a bank of super-capacitors be a better option than huge and heavy lead acid batts?

These can be bought and made in whatever series or parallel format you want, big or small.

They charge almost instantly, and the energy can be drawn off and used just like a conventional battery.

Not sure what all the fuss is about with this Elon Musk battery thing to be honest.

Super-cap batteries can be seen on video sharing websites like YT and othes. Many people are starting to make their own car batteries out of them to replace the big and heavy lead acid car batts.



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 02:21 AM
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a reply to: randomtangentsrme

My last electrical bill I averaged 22 KWH/day. I think I could manage just fine with one of those if I had Solar panels. I would definitely do cooking laundry and such during daylight hours when I was producing electric since that is when it is a heavy load.

Electric is pretty cheap here though. For the first 1000 kwh it costs 11.324 per and above 1000 it is 13.686 per kwh.



posted on Apr, 30 2015 @ 07:10 AM
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originally posted by: MysterX
a reply to: Thisisfun2015

Wouldn't a bank of super-capacitors be a better option than huge and heavy lead acid batts?


No.

The issue is total storage. Capacitors don't have the WH/volume that electrochemical cells do. Or flywheels.



posted on May, 1 2015 @ 12:02 AM
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originally posted by: Grimpachi

originally posted by: Qumulys
a reply to: Kashai

Except that to my knowledge in my state, you legally have to be connected to the grid. I wonder if those laws will ever be reviewed some time soon. I doubt it.

Either way, Elon Musk is awesome and he should be the celebrity (not Kim K) that young kids look up to.


Just because you are hooked up to the grid does not mean you have to draw power from it, but you can sell excess power back to the grid.

I read reports from testers of this and in the areas where electric is cheaper at night than during the day those people were charging their batteries at night then selling it back during the day to make a proffit.


That's changing.

Utility Wants To Charge Solar Panel Users For Not Using Their Energy

www.techdirt.com...



posted on May, 1 2015 @ 12:14 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

Yeah, some states are pretty screwed up.

Where I am at it wouldn't be beneficial to do it.

I get charged one rate for the first 1000KWH and a higher rate for anything over I also think they pay a lower rate for electric you feed into the grid than what you buy so it would only make sense to sell back your excess.

Your link doesn't go into detail, but last time I looked into it they were talking about a $15 a month connection fee. They would still buy back excess electric. There are those that wish to charge much higher rates, but it hasn't gone through.
edit on 1-5-2015 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2015 @ 12:34 AM
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a reply to: Grimpachi

Yes. Right now it's not bad, but things are changing. How far that goes remains to be seen.



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