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Scientists find the origin of Antarctica’s creepy ‘Blood Falls’

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posted on Apr, 28 2015 @ 12:41 PM
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www.washingtonpost.com...




The McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are some of the most extreme desert regions on the planet. But new research indicates that the region may actually be full of salty, extremely cold groundwater. The water may even connect surrounding lakes into a massive network, and it probably hosts extreme microbial life.

The findings were reported Tuesday in Nature Communications.

Despite McMurdo's apparent dryness on the surface, it's always hinted at something more: The region is home to the magnificently creepy Blood Falls, a red ooze that shines bright against the otherwise desolate surface. For a while scientists believed that red algae gave this mysterious, bloody ooze its vibrant color. But even though iron oxide is responsible for the hue, analysis has shown that the feature does contain strange bacterial life.
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Blood Falls seeps from the end of the Taylor Glacier into Lake Bonney. The tent at theleft provides a sense of scale for just how big the phenomenon is. Scientists knew that ooze had to be coming up from somewhere, but were surprised to find just how extensive the valley's briny waterways might be.

Water increases its resistivity as it freezes, meaning that it's less conductive of electrical currents. But salty water -- which can stay liquid at lower temperatures -- have very low resistivity.

"We found, as expected, that there was something sourcing Blood Falls," Mikucki said, "and we found that these brines were more widespread than previously thought. They appear to connect these surface lakes that appear separated on the ground. That means there's the potential for a much more extensive subsurface ecosystem, which I'm pretty jazzed about."
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It's possible that this extensive brine isn't unique to the valley, Mikucki explained, and that subsurface ecosystems of extreme microbes might be connected to visible lakes, and perhaps even interact with the ocean.
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"It turns out that as beautiful and visceral as Blood Falls is in these valleys, it's actually just a blip. It's a little defect in this much more exciting feature," she said.
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"The subsurface is actually pretty attractive when you think about life on other planets. It’s cold and dark and has all these strikes against it, but it’s protected from the harsh environment on the surface," Mikucki said






posted on Apr, 28 2015 @ 12:42 PM
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I thought this was very cool...didn't know such an event existed! You just have to admire the wonderful planet we live on where we can appreciate how nature works in mysterious ways



posted on Apr, 28 2015 @ 12:53 PM
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For as cool as things like this are.. When I hear "strange bacterial life," it sets off alarms.

Haven't they seen the movies and shows?



posted on Apr, 28 2015 @ 05:03 PM
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a reply to: Skywatcher2011

Antarctica just became more metal than it already was! We will continue to learn about our planet until its consumed by the sun. Or we blow it up. Whichever happens first.



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