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What if Turkey is really the root of ALL civilisations?

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posted on Apr, 24 2015 @ 11:59 AM
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a reply to: Macdon
It was just a Turkey joke, as answer to an turkey joke. But thanks for the complemantary info.

a reply to: stumason

The pole shift was just from this 3657 year dude, that's not what it was about, really. Of course Egypt had a different climate, the Sahara wasn't always a desert and so on.
The point i try to figure out, since the Bosporus formed so late is more or less, if it wouldn't be possible the continents started drifting apart (faster, or at all,) after they lost their protective ice shields?




posted on Apr, 24 2015 @ 12:27 PM
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originally posted by: Peeple
The pole shift was just from this 3657 year dude, that's not what it was about, really. Of course Egypt had a different climate, the Sahara wasn't always a desert and so on.


Fair do's



originally posted by: Peeple
The point i try to figure out, since the Bosporus formed so late is more or less, if it wouldn't be possible the continents started drifting apart (faster, or at all,) after they lost their protective ice shields?


Short answer - nope.

Long answer - Nope, because the continents were pretty much in their exact place they are now back then, give or take a few metres allowing for 10,000 years of drift.

What did happen (and is still happening] is the crust underneath the ice sheet is rising - it's called Post glacial rebound



posted on Apr, 24 2015 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: stumason

And I am not convinced you are right.

I don't know if you are familiar with the Vanaland Thesis? Here is something but unfortunately in German. Hominide So I am not the only one thinking the melting masses of ice reshaped a big deal of what we know now as our continents.



posted on Apr, 24 2015 @ 12:54 PM
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a reply to: Peeple

My German is rusty, but I think you might be misunderstanding that page - it doesn't seem to imply that the continents moved at all. In fact, it seems to show the continents as they are now, but with much lower sea levels...It also maps the migrations of hominids around the world, some using the land bridges that were there as a result of the lower sea level. Many think that the sea was up to 200 metres lower than it was today (with local variations)

I have not heard of any theory that suggests rapid continental shift happened after the ice age.



posted on Apr, 24 2015 @ 01:04 PM
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a reply to: Peeple

Do not let me spoil the fun, but with a speed of movement of 1,89 cm / year - a 10,000 year period would produce a movement by 18,900 cm - which is only 189 m - and not 1890 km ...

.
edit on 24-4-2015 by deckdel because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 24 2015 @ 01:30 PM
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a reply to: stumason
The point is like i said, i try to figure out if and how it could be possible and what formed the Bosporust and so on, i was just very drawn to the map, because with a little ice on top early humans could have made their way to the American continent on foot.
But you're surely welcome because like you noticed my theory still has holes.

a reply to: deckdel

Ahem, uh it was ahem the calculator and i ahem... Aliens. It was definitely aliens.


Yeah i'll have to work a bit more on it, i guess.

edit on 24-4-2015 by Peeple because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 24 2015 @ 02:02 PM
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a reply to: Peeple

@peeple -- we've all been there. . . And now we're back! for trouble in paradise!

But, the core idea makes sense. Much of the oceans were tied up in this huge mile-high cross-continental mass of ice - I mean - there were villages and folks living in the English Channels ... at the bottom of today's North Sea... There are sunken forests at the bottom of Mex Gulf. So, the sea level was indeed very very low compared to where it is today. To get from Asia to Americas - basically did not even make your feet wet !

- SF



posted on May, 28 2015 @ 08:19 AM
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originally posted by: Peeple
a reply to: Greathouse



The only problem I see with that is. What about the fossilized records that show specific creatures that were exclusive to specific continents millions of years ago?

Turkey still has 30.6% endemic plants. So specific creatures could also just have been following these plants, respectively the enviromental circumstances, like woods, planes, mountains and such.

a reply to: funkadeliaaaa

And you are just talking nonsense because these nationalities didn't exist, we are talking between 10.-18 THOUSAND years ago. So maybe you want to check your informations before you just talk without content?
India is by the way mythologically very connected and on the Asian continent, just as Turkey is. Yes from America still a long way, but from Turkey in the other direction even closer and easier to reach than what I suggested. Will say: Bollocks, go and research.

a reply to: michaelbrux

I was thinking about your "becos" story and noticed, the German word "Bäcker", or bacery, is this maybe a linguistical rudiment from the first word for bread? Definetly an interesting hint if it is, now that my head caught up with what you actually said.

a reply to: one4all

Magnetic pole shift, might have been the event, after the continental plates got tied together before from the ice, which started melting around 18.ooo years ago, the switch and the change of the ocean flow could have caused the fracture of something like a huge American-European-Asian plate. But what would the 3657year cycle be, you are talking about? Sources?


Nope, I hate to say, most of this thread makes little sense at all. Indo-Europeans did not exist 10.000 years ago, they only came onto to the scene around the 4th century BC during the early Bronze Age. They would have their roots in the proto-Yamna/Kurgan burial culture in the Pontic Steppe (modern Ukraine). Again, nothing to do with Turkey. Certain Indo-European tribes would eventually make their way to Turkey, such as the Cimmerians, Phrygians, and Hittites, but they certainly didn't have their origin in Anatolia.

Is it just me, or do Turks constantly try to self-aggrandize with empty nationalism, while simultaneously attempting to steal other people's history? I hate to break it to you, but modern Turkey gets it name from a bunch of steppe savages that could never create their own civilization. They came into Anatolia and hijacked the infrastructure of the Greeks, while relying on Islam to give them culture. The original Turks were primitive nomads who only knew how to plunder and destroy.

So because of this Turks, knowing their primitive and unimpressive historical background, try to steal the history of other nations and people.

Nice try though.
edit on 28-5-2015 by DiggerDogg because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 12:16 AM
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a reply to: DiggerDogg

Wow dude.


So because of this Turks, knowing their primitive and unimpressive historical background
that's wrong...
I think it is pretty impressive, or how do you think the coffe came to Vienna? Also one could argue Alexander the Great was almost a turkish man.
Besides that, just because you follow the offilcial narrative, doesn't mean it is the one and only truth. And it was merely to nail the location and the common ancestors.
The original Turks, were people neither of us really knew. And not everything leaves a trace. These underground cities, are pretty hard to date, because it is the natural rock in that region and the inhabitants changed over time. A very very long period of time. And it matches with the mythology, if you think about it.
I am not saying i have proof, but you are just... kinda racist.



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 12:39 AM
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originally posted by: Peeple
a reply to: DiggerDogg

Wow dude.


So because of this Turks, knowing their primitive and unimpressive historical background
that's wrong...
I think it is pretty impressive, or how do you think the coffe came to Vienna? Also one could argue Alexander the Great was almost a turkish man.
Besides that, just because you follow the offilcial narrative, doesn't mean it is the one and only truth. And it was merely to nail the location and the common ancestors.
The original Turks, were people neither of us really knew. And not everything leaves a trace. These underground cities, are pretty hard to date, because it is the natural rock in that region and the inhabitants changed over time. A very very long period of time. And it matches with the mythology, if you think about it.
I am not saying i have proof, but you are just... kinda racist.


What? That is possibly the most retarded thing I've ever heard. Have you studied history at all? Alexander was a Macedonian, and his mother was Illyrian (what is now modern day Albania). Alexander would have been genetically similar to modern day Balkanites from the region, I.e. Greek Macedonians, Vlachs, and FYROMians. If you want to find people who shared the blood of Alexander, look there. He had nothing to do with modern day Turkey.

Are you even aware of where the word "Turkey" comes from? The Turkic peoples were originally central Asians who migrated to Turkey during the early Middle Ages. They defeated the Byzantines in some major battles early on (Manzikert etc) and settled in central Anatolia, and finally conquered Constantinople after centuries of slowly wearing the Greeks down using their superior cavalry and steppe tactics (very versatile and effective against the cumbersone formations the Greeks used).

That is when the nation of "Turkey" was born. Turkey is anything but ancient.

Now, if you want to talk about native Anatolians, yes, they are very ancient. Hittites gave us iron after all, so we owe a lot to them. But that's beside the point- no, all civilization did not come from Anatolia. The Mesoamerican, Chinese, and Indus valley civilizations all developed independently of the Near East.

So what are you, a Turk born in Germany, now living in London?

I apologize if I wrote I quickly in this post, I am trying to lift weights right now while typing this on my phone.

*Addendum: In my first post I wrote "4th century BC" in reference to Indo-Europeans, and I meant to say 4th millennium. My mistake. Can't edit the post now because it's been too long.

Now, study up on some real archeology dear, then we can talk.

edit on 29-5-2015 by DiggerDogg because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 02:19 AM
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Poor Peepol, I hope I didn't scare her off.

edit on 29-5-2015 by DiggerDogg because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 03:09 AM
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a reply to: DiggerDogg

No thanks. I was playing with the idea and you're just interested in my nationality as if it matters. Maybe you should have a look at how we all are more or less descendants from the same tribe?
I am European with Asian influences, just like almost everybody else in modern Europe. And my time frame is kind of super far before yours, around 19.000- 15.000 bc. And as i said i was using Euro-Iranian because of the region not specifically the people.
If you want to scare me off you'll have to try harder, all you do is making me feel like talking to someone who just wants to be right without considering what i actually said,or capable of grasping the crazy complicated concept of a linear timeline.
How many people would you say lived at that time? Not that many right? Because of scarce ressources, difficult climate, huge changes in the environment, etc. Someone living in a whole in a thick rock would have huge advantages and Göbeli proves there was more culture happening than almost every else at that time.
So if the hunters and gatherers started to build settlements it would have been there, the most logical choice, because of a florishing relatively warm environment, safe housing with little effort required to enlarge it and we tell the story of the flood so long I think it referrs to something that happened shortly after we invented story telling, like the birth of the Bosporus. Which totally works by the way with my narrative, because geology proves it originated around 19.000 bc.
Not saying it is the truth, but at least I am not a condescending ass, who thinks he knows it all. Love yourself much or why the # do you think i would care that you're in the gym? Just couldn't resist, or what? Want to post a sweaty picture too?



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 04:26 AM
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a reply to: Peeple

Well, you outta just change the thread title then. Turkey isn't the same thing as the historical region called Anatolia.

European with Asian influences? No idea what that's supposed to mean.

I'll tell you where the first hunter-gatherers settled down and started farming, that'd have been around Jericho, a ways south of Turkey.

The Assyrians, Kurds, Armenians (all people that the rotten Turkish nation tried to genocide) are a hell of a lot more ancient then some kebabs from Turkey.

So, you had a Turkish boyfriend or what? Would explain these wild theories maybe.

Love myself? I dunno about that, I've got my own slew of problems, I'd say I love myself less than most people.

But..... I feel pretty damn good right now, I feel like this: youtu.be...

Now, if you want that sweaty picture, just hit me up with a message and I'll make it happen.



posted on May, 31 2015 @ 05:46 AM
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a reply to: DiggerDogg

Derinkuyu is Turkye. Did you read the OP or is this a personal thing?
Sorry but I can tot6ally see why you don't like yourself...



posted on May, 31 2015 @ 09:32 AM
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The picture in the Australian caves are common the beings have many different names but I've been told that they are a shape shifting creator god called byami if the aborigines of past painted a white face it it was one of their deities due to the fact that white man apparently came to Australia only three hundred years ago , and I know of many aboriginal artists who still paint this today in the year 2015. So may be you are on to something but every thing in life has a beginning an end and memories and truth may be passed on but can be forgotten due to the fact of war or in the aboriginal and native new Zealanders , south Americans many myths died with elders and the people's of these cultures due to the fact of other nations wiping them out




posted on May, 31 2015 @ 12:38 PM
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a reply to: Peeple

Yeah, so what? From what I read it's less than 3500-3000 years old, depending on who they think it was built by. Do you really think a site that young somehow means Turkey is the "root of all civilization"......

Sorry, that doesn't make any sense.

I read the OP, spent about 2 minutes trying to decipher the garbled up sentences, and then I closed my laptop and decided to go do something else.


edit on 31-5-2015 by DiggerDogg because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 31 2015 @ 12:41 PM
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a reply to: Peeple

My simonized, knee jerk reaction to the header.

W in TF are you talk'n about?



posted on May, 31 2015 @ 01:24 PM
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originally posted by: Peeple
a reply to: DiggerDogg

Derinkuyu is Turkye. Did you read the OP or is this a personal thing?
Sorry but I can tot6ally see why you don't like yourself...



It is a personal thingy for him , ain't it obvious ?



posted on May, 31 2015 @ 04:52 PM
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Humans spread from Turkey for sure. Makes sense secularly/archaeologically biblically/etc...doesn't matter what you believe in creation/evolution/spontaneous formation of living matter. The result:Ancestors started somewhere and it's in that region.

en.m.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jun, 1 2015 @ 10:08 AM
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a reply to: normipoo

Aborigines are another good point, not only the Hopi who tell stories about unusually white faces. I can't still get over the fact there is next to no archeology in Australia.
But the cave paintings with the white dudes with Halos, it doesn't have to be aliens like alternative archeologists claim, living in a cave makes you look different, that's for sure. And i kind of think like the sparrow humans once too originated from one and the same place, maybe met up with others which spread earlier, i keep forgetting there are also neandterthaleans and maybe others which got away before. But these "gods came" stories are very similiar and obviously very human.

a reply to: DiggerDogg

Thanks for wasting your time, but i still don't really know what your problem is? Or how you can be so sure it is only 3000-3500 years. it is rock. try to date that. and still inhabited today=> it is impossible to say when the first people moved in there.
Sure you're totally mainstream, but why should it not be a little bit different.
Also I'd like to know what your problem with Turkye is?

a reply to: TheCretinHop

Not for sure, but possibly. Once you think your sure, you start riding the bias-train. But i like my idea too. Thanks



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