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Is it Too Late to Stop the Runaway Train?

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posted on Apr, 20 2015 @ 12:45 PM
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This is the 35th chapter of my book, Fever Rising. There is only one chapter left after this one. To read the rest of the book, follow this link to chapter 34 and then at the beginning of the links you'll find links to previous chapters.

The Countdown to Extinction has Begun

Chapter 35: Is it Too Late to Stop the Runaway Train?

It would take a world wide collaborative effort to stop the runaway train of global warming at this point. We’d all have to come together and fight a major war as allies, a war against runaway climate change, but in our current thinking, there is a right wing movement to dispel this as hogwash. As I’ve said numerous times, there is just too much money being made off polluting our atmosphere than there is in saving it. The money blinds them and until a major city like New York is actually wiped off the map as a consequence of this careless behavior, it’s highly unlikely that governments and corporations will come together and agree to save mankind.

I know that I sound like I’m blaming all this on human activities to begin with, but that’s not the intention. What I simply meant in the last paragraph is that in order for the masses to collectively agree there is a problem in the first place, it will take a global catastrophe like civilization has never witnessed.

Can we stop the chain reaction? I don’t know the answers to that question, but I don’t think it could hurt if a world wide effort began in an attempt to try. First of all, we should be trying to capture the methane that’s releasing all over the place. We could use the gas for energy which would be a huge benefit to mankind, lowering our winter heating bills. Currently, there are no major efforts to capture this gas and both sides are in no rush. For one, the oil and gas industry wants nothing more than to control the amount of gas harvested. It’s as simple as supply and demand for them. Our winter heating bills are already decreasing due to all the fracking. Can you imagine if all the leaking methane was harvested and used for energy purposes? There would be plenty gas in supply way over demand, and who would lose? The oil and gas corporations would, some of the largest corporations in the world.

On the other hand, the global warming activists aren’t pursuing the capture of methane to mitigate the problem because that would divert attention from carbon emissions. The fight has been focused on carbon emissions for too long, but now it needs to take a long and hard look at methane gas. Attention need not be diverted away from carbon dioxide, but widened to include methane.

Several years ago there were methane projects underway, but they grinded to a halt prior to global warming talks because governments and activists thought it would divert attention. These projects need to get started again and on a mass scale. Methane only lives about a decade in the atmosphere, versus carbon dioxide which lives up to a century. For this reason, if a world wide effort could mitigate the methane release we’d see quick results and maybe we’d still be able to stop the runaway train.

Are there other ways to stop the runaway train? In a previous chapter I contend that governments are working together to spray aluminum oxide nanoparticles to deflect the sun’s heat in the atmosphere, preventing it from heating the earth’s surface, aka, Chemtrails.

According to a November 15, 2011 article in the Guardian, the Mongolians started a new idea of creating extra ice in the winter for extra cooling in the summer. In the Mongolian capital city of Ulan Bator, officials plan to use an engineering firm to drill bore holes into ice formed on the Tuul River in the winter time. The water will be discharged across the surface where it will freeze. Basically, the process adds layers of ice on top of layers of ice and they will repeat the process throughout the winter time.

Over the winter of 2013-14, the Great Lakes nearly froze over with 93% of the lakes covered with ice, a near-record. The news reported that this would make for a chilly spring as it would take longer for the ice to melt. The Mongolian idea might not be a bad idea and it makes a lot of sense.

Jonny Mnemonic discusses at his website on several occasions different things that could be done on a world wide scale, as well as what you or I could do as individuals to help ourselves and the environment. For the better part of the remainder of this chapter, I will feature some of Jonny’s thoughts on what to do about stopping the runaway train. Some of these are from exchanges he had with other members on Above Top Secret, while others are from sections of his Jumping Jack Flash Hypothesis website, such as this first one, entitled “Mitigation from Below?”

JumpingJackFlashHypothesis.blogspot.com
By Jonny Mnemonic
I believe 'they' have come up with a mitigation mechanism to fight the hydrogen sulfide problem, one which I haven't mentioned before.
Hydrogen sulfide is heavier than air so it flows downhill when there's no wind blowing it around. It's helpful to think of it as a very lightweight, invisible and deadly layer of fluid that will rest atop water, but will flow downhill just like water, ending up in the same places that water does. In the cities, where does water eventually flow to? The sewers! Sewers are also a standard source of hydrogen sulfide production, so I'm sure there's always been some effort done to eliminate it in sewers even before this planetary-scale problem cropped up. I think they've now put into operation a fairly ingenious method of fighting hydrogen sulfide plumes in the atmosphere, at least in the United States, and hopefully elsewhere.

Do you ever watch NWS Weather Radar? Sometimes you see these 'blobs' appear around cities. They seem to appear in specific geographic areas, and sometimes you see a blob fade from one city, and grow around another, as if they are following some invisible force as it moves across the country.

So, what are they doing? Well, first, they probably keep negative pressure in the sewer system as much as possible, and they pull the air entering the sewers through a plant running the Claus process, to clean the hydrogen sulfide from the air. They also have huge ozone generators somewhere, possibly in the sewer systems, or perhaps just connected to the sewer systems. If a dangerous plume is blowing through, they reverse the air pressure and pump ozone out and up, where it combines with the hydrogen sulfide like this: H2S + O3 --> H2O + O2 + S.

See the results of that equation? Water, oxygen and sulfur particulate. I believe the NWS weather radar is picking up the water vapor that results from this mitigation effort, so when you see those blobs around a city, you can probably infer that a hydrogen sulfide plume is blowing through that area. As time passes, you'll see a blob fade out and another appear over a new city, as the plume blows onward. The ozone is probably created on-the-fly, as best they can, because it is highly reactive and is very difficult to store or transport, and one can only imagine how much electricity this effort takes.


Continued...




posted on Apr, 20 2015 @ 12:48 PM
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If correct, this has some major implications. One implication is that you are probably safer in cities than out in the boonies. We'll have to crunch tightly together in any case, over time, because we simply won't be able to defend huge areas containing sparse populations. It will be a better use of resources to gather in the cities and defend smaller areas holding lots of people. Another implication is that we don't really want to evacuate too many cities because if we can withstand Earth's hydrogen sulfide 'pulse' long enough (which is honestly rather doubtful) then over time this could actually eventually fix the problem and scrub the atmosphere clean again, at least of hydrogen sulfide (which is, in my opinion, a much greater threat than the methane releases).

Anyway, if that's what they're doing, and it looks like it to me, then this is really a pretty brilliant way to at least attempt to attack the problem. This tactic leverages existing infrastructure with modern technology in terms of dealing with a hazardous heavier-than-air gas like hydrogen sulfide. Except for the extra demand in regards to electricity usage involved in producing ozone, it's probably quite cost-effective. And because it all happens out of sight, it's also easy to conceal this from people, except for the weather blobs, which they always attempt to explain away as water vapor. Yes, it is water vapor, but that doesn't explain the way the blobs appear and disappear, as if they're tracking something moving through/across the geography - which I think they are.


Jonny and I differ on only a few points about this whole theory and one of those is the reason it started in the first place. He believes that mankind was not responsible for triggering the gas release. He stated that this process has happened several times in earth’s history when man wasn’t around so it’s an over stretch to think humans caused it now. I, on the other hand, think that human influences are responsible this time around. During our discussions on the dangerous gas thread, a poster attacked him in regards to the manmade global warming crowd. Here was his response.

Post by JonnyMnemonic
AboveTopSecret.com
The Above Network, LLC
Dangerous Gas may be the cause of super-charged, mass die-offs, quakes and more
www.abovetopsecret.com...
I don't think anyone's mentioned AGW. Sure as heck not me. The oceans are obviously warming, but that could be from below, thus all the volcanoes. I don't really care why the oceans are warming. It doesn't matter. The people who survive, if there are any, they can figure that out. First things first, and first we have to figure out how to survive the atmosphere filling up with accelerants, one of which is also a poison as lethal as hydrogen cyanide, which is what they use in gas chambers. I'd say pretty obviously this has little or nothing to do with humans, since it is a cyclical event and it happened several times at least when there WERE no humans. We just happen to be here now this time, unfortunately for us.

One thing we could do, if we were to wake up our smart people, is try to figure out if there's any way to drain off the heat purposely and consciously, instead of just letting it run amok and melt all the methane hydrates and turn the oceans into anoxic poison factories. Dunno how that could be done, but that doesn't mean that all of humanity's smartest people couldn't figure out a way, if they were to put their minds to it, but they can't do that while they're sleep-walking their way to the grave.


Here are some other ideas Jonny expressed.

Post by JonnyMnemonic
AboveTopSecret.com
The Above Network, LLC
Dangerous Gas may be the cause of super-charged, mass die-offs, quakes and more
www.abovetopsecret.com...
I think the problem is that a lot of the heat is coming from beneath us. That's also why all the volcanic eruptions. How do you cool the Earth itself? I don't think we can. We can prevent new heat from getting added to 'the system' from above. I think that's what the chemtrails are for. A better idea would be to put some kind of nano-mesh between us and the Sun, in a stable orbit (not in Earth's orbit, but between us and the Sun). It'd have to be huge though. But then, there have been lots of mysterious gigantic Delta IV launches, and maybe they are doing that, using that secret space plane to deploy or assemble the shield. Lots of people have seen a 'black dot' in the middle of the Sun when taking pics. And they didn't USED to see that dot. So the 'sensor overload' excuses don't make much sense. Could that be a solar shield? I think...maybe. I hope so.

Practically speaking though, we have to go underground and/or vacate the Earth. Once the oceans belch up enough hydrogen sulfide, it simply won't be survivable on the surface, at all. The Moon, with a vacuum, would be more survivable, and there's water there, some at least. You can survive vacuum for 30 seconds or a minute. You won't survive hydrogen sulfide that long; the 'Slaughterhouse Sledgehammer Effect' will kill you quicker once the gas concentrations pick up. Remember Andrew Breitbart? Outside, on the coast, dropped dead. Then the coroner who examined him dropped dead. He got hit by hydrogen sulfide, fairly sure. Knocked him dead, got in his clothes. The coroner had no idea that he should expect a lethal gas, so he went to take the clothes off, and he got dosed too. So concentrated plumes (1 part per thousand or more) are ALREADY blowing around, here and there.


Jonny had made a comment about the elite’s building bunkers around the world, especially in the Himalayas. I asked him about this because there are quite a few conspiracy theories that talk about the world’s governments digging underground.

Post by JonnyMnemonic
AboveTopSecret.com
The Above Network, LLC
Dangerous Gas may be the cause of super-charged, mass die-offs, quakes and more
www.abovetopsecret.com...
I think the super-rich have a plan to survive. They're building bunkers on the Himalayas. That should keep them above the hydrogen sulfide most of the time. Then inside the mountain, they will have a large container or hollowed out area which stores compressed clean air. When the air blowing by is clean, they breathe that, and they keep their stored air topped off. When the air gets dirty, then they breathe from the stored compressed clean air. If they're high enough up in elevation from the surrounding area then that should be doable, and they might be able to survive that way indefinitely, or at least as long as their natural lives, assuming they solve the other problems (energy, food, water).

Continued...



posted on Apr, 20 2015 @ 12:51 PM
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Yes. 30 years of ignorance and calling hippies has done the trick. No surprises, world going down the crapper, should have been listening ...the end.



posted on Apr, 20 2015 @ 12:51 PM
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That's not how a civilization survives though. That's just how a few people survive, for a while. For our civilization to survive then we'll have to think bigger. Seriously, the Moon is right there. It doesn't EVER have this cyclical methane-H2S extinction event problem. It's tectonically stable, so you can dig and drill all you want and not fear a volcano rising from under you and wiping you out. There's water there, which means O2 if you separate it out, plenty of solar power. In fact, if you eye the Japanese JAXA photos of the 'dark side' of the Moon, there are lots of areas that look like development is going on: right angles, squares, buildings, what looks like roads going from crater to crater (presumably to mine the water). I think that's us, building Plan B, because Plan A (living on the Earth's surface) is about to run out of time.

Here is another exchange between HopeforEveryone and Jonny.

Post by HopeforEveryone
AboveTopSecret.com
The Above Network, LLC
Dangerous Gas may be the cause of super-charged, mass die-offs, quakes and more
www.abovetopsecret.com...
But what can we do ? I remember watching this chilling documentary in the 90's which predicted the Amazon burning down, then the hydrates being released from the ocean floor, then full on run away global warming. There's a whole climate change is nonsense movement you'd have to convince first, then getting governments to co-operate, would be the first time in history, and then try and save as many as possible, ideally the youngest, smartest, fittest and best the world has to offer. Alas I'm getting on, reasonably fit but no genius so I'm for the chop.

Like I said earlier in the thread, it'll take something like New York exploding or half of Europe flooding before action would be taken. We're more likely have a huge nuclear exchange as countries break down, military takes over, scramble for remaining land and resources. It ain't going to be a nice civilised round of tea and meetings.


Post by JonnyMnemonic
AboveTopSecret.com
The Above Network, LLC
Dangerous Gas may be the cause of super-charged, mass die-offs, quakes and more
www.abovetopsecret.com...
As for adaptation, well, you better start using your noggin' there. Insulated home? Ozone generators? Control your air circulation system? Compressed air for positive air pressure? Get air from an elevated intake source, with multiple bends and drainages? Indoor plants for oxygen and food? Water filtration? I don't have all the answers. I'm trying some of those things. But the lack of answers is why I want to wake people up. A collective of minds can come up with more/better solutions than any one person. The alternative is basically suicide. No problem with people committing suicide; I think that's one right that can't really be taken away from people anyway. But some might want to give it a go. They have to wake up first though.

The following post by Jonny he talks about the world coming together and a few things we can do.

Post by JonnyMnemonic
AboveTopSecret.com
The Above Network, LLC
Dangerous Gas may be the cause of super-charged, mass die-offs, quakes and more
www.abovetopsecret.com...
Rich people can dig in underground in the Himalayas. Normal folks, best we can do is wake others up, wake everyone up, so that we can work together, hopefully get some informational aid. The government could be helpful if they weren't hiding this. THEY could try bigger things without worry of us 'catching on', if we already know. They could show us what to build, help us reorganize human civilization around maximum survival, give us forecasting so we know when what gases are blowing where and the risks we face each day.

Short of that, we can try time-buying things at the personal level. Ozone generators. Insulate homes. Indoor plants. Maybe build some shipping container homes underground, connect to solar panels (but watch the copper and rusted iron problem). Get hydrogen sulfide detectors, HazMat suits, extra oxgyen tanks and compressors, batteries, food, water, vitamins, yada yada. Adjust to not going outside and not using combustion engines of any kind. Not easy!

Seems easier to wake everyone up and face the problems together, work on bigger scales, build bigger things, make use of factories and economy of scale and all that, while we still can. Get on a wartime footing. Not a war against humans but a war FOR humans. Yes, that'd involve sacrifice. They might tell me I have to leave my home because they're going to bulldoze this area to make it easier to protect a different area from the fires and explosions. Well, alrighty then. (But...booo! Heh.) We'd have to be adaptable, adjust to a fluid non-conventional situation. Maybe they don't think people can handle that and that it's better to just placate us and tell us everything's okay until we're dead. To which I would reply: do we not even deserve a CHANCE to make sacrifices and work together for our mutual survival? Continuity of GOVERNMENT seems to be something they understand. Well, how about continuity of PEOPLE?


Jonny has a frequently asked questions section on the website, Jumping Jack Flash Hypothesis.blogspot.com. Here is one of the questions a visitor asked, followed by Jonny’s response.

From JumpingJackFlashHypothesis.blogspot.com
Q: Is there anything I can do to protect myself?

A: There are some things you can try. I will tell you all of the things that I am trying, to protect myself and my household.

1) I had some centrifugal fans and activated carbon filters laying around, so I am running those non-stop. That would have been too much cost normally, but I already had them, so why not put them to use?

2) I got three ozone generators and I run them non-stop, spread around the house. The ozone should react away at least a good deal of any hydrogen sulfide that infiltrates the house, and also help eliminate any that might get absorbed into absorbent materials (like rugs and carpet seem particularly dangerous, because they rest on the floor).

3) I eat melatonin once per day, since it helps protect the neurology (it's used to treat Parkinsons symptoms, which is a neurological affliction), and because it helps prevent DNA/RNA damage, and the increased UV levels are surely causing some of that.

4) I surrounded the house, as best I could, with plants. Tree, shrubs, whatever. That may help knock any plumes blowing through to the ground, and the gas would then hopefully drain into the sewers and away from me. I was also having probs with plants not doing too well, or dying, so I surrounded their bases with bricks, which would help push any ground-level plumes away from their root systems. (And they all started doing better after I did that.) Indoor plants are also a good idea, if you can keep them alive, as they produce oxygen.


Continued...



posted on Apr, 20 2015 @ 12:54 PM
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5) I spend as little time outdoors as possible, and I wear a hat when I'm outside, so if a plume descends on me, then the hat might make it run off away from my air intake systems (nose/mouth) and eyes. Also, I drive as little as possible and when I am in the car, I try to keep the windows and vents closed and not run either the AC or the heat.

6) I covered all my upper windows on the inside with Reflectix insulation and duct tape. Looks like sh#t, but it does actually help with heating/cooling bills, which means the central air/heat runs less, which means less exposure to outside air.

7) My outdoor central AC unit is elevated off the ground, on a pedestal, and is also on the side of the house most shielded from wind, which means it is less exposed to whatever may be blowing through in the atmosphere. I didn't do that; it's just fortunate that it was that way originally. And it's also in a kind of shielded nook too, and the roof doesn't slant toward it, which is again simply another fortunate coincidence.

8) I don't own a car. My significant other does. We only need one, and even BEFORE this problem cropped up, we were only driving about 2500 miles per year. Now it's less than that. She parks on the street, but the house is set back a ways, so it's not ever right next to the car. We have no driveway or garage and though in the past I have wished that we did, now I'm happy we don't, since they wouldn't be any benefit and might be a liability (especially a garage, which is like a small semi-vacant house with a combustion vehicle inside). We don't take the battery out, so we're taking chances with that.

9) Given the fire potential, I have at least one fire extinguisher on each floor (one in each room on the main floor), and one in the car too. They don't cost much, especially considering the potential price you might pay if you need one and there's none handy.

A reader submitted this information, as regards quick-connects for vehicle batteries:
"I just checked and a company named Wirthco makes quick-connects for batteries which are marketed mainly towards the boaters because they are frequently installing & uninstalling batteries. There are some on Ebay."

What you decide to do, if anything, is entirely up to you. I merely try to provide information, so people can decide for themselves what they want to do. Those are the things that *I* thought were at least worth trying, for myself and my household.


On the dangerous gas thread at Above Top Secret, one member asked Jonny about hydrogen sulfide detectors and if they were a good investment. Here’s Jonny’s response.

Post by JonnyMnemonic
AboveTopSecret.com
The Above Network, LLC
Dangerous Gas may be the cause of super-charged, mass die-offs, quakes and more
www.abovetopsecret.com...
I have one, bought one a couple of years ago. They sell them mainly to septic and oil workers but anyone can buy them. The problem with them is that they have to be recharged regularly, and it's expensive as hell! To get another 6-month recharge on mine would cost $150, and I don't have the moolah. But there are other problems with them too. For example, to exterminate us doesn't require that the gas be present at all times. If there's a 1 in 1000 chance that a plume sweeps over you and kills you on any particular day, then life expectancy is about 3 years, which is fewer years than it takes the average person to be conceived and grow to reproductive age, so that's easily mathematical extinction. And it may be something like that: MOSTLY not present, but present enough to wipe us out over time. So you'd kinda need to be prepared to stand around in a self-contained HazMat suit for months and wait for that one reading that would have killed you, and then you could say "Aha! It beeped! 1200 ppm!" Or you could spend time down at the Mississippi River (in my case), with it held down close to the water, and hope when it comes by it doesn't kill you, and forego the HazMat suit and the weird looks.

Another problem is the absorbency problem. It looks to me like it doesn't just stay in gas form floating around endlessly. It looks like wood or clothes or trash or mulch or anything absorbent absorbs it, like a sponge absorbs water, so then it's still there, but it's INSIDE something, waiting for ignition. And then the detector wouldn't pick it up much, if at all, yet touching that stuff could still poison you.

This really isn't a simple problem, nor one easily addressed by 'the common man'. These kinds of problems are why we HAVE governments, but when you lose the ability to trust the government, as appears to be the case here, because it's such a scary problem, then what? I don't have any easy answers for that question. Wish I did.

For the record, I didn't detect anything with the introductory 6-month charge that my detector came with, which lasted from the beginning of 2011 to the middle of 2011. However, at the time I hadn't fully thought through the 'heavier-than-air' aspect of hydrogen sulfide, so I was just walking around with it held at waist or chest level. Also, I live in just about the highest-elevation area around me, locally called 'The Hill', which isn't really the place where I'd expect to get a positive reading, at least not as much as the areas around me that are lower in elevation. And I didn't take it out every day or anything either. I mean, I was trying to stay OUT of danger, not put myself IN danger just to get a positive reading. I do actually want to live. Heh.

Having said all that, if I had the moolah, I would get my detector recharged. I'd rather have it working than not, especially since I already bought it and it cost a fair bit. Even if its only use would be to tell me I'll be dead within a minute or so, hey, I'd rather go out with a sound effect than not. So if you can afford one and can afford to keep it going, don't let me dissuade you!


Continued...



posted on Apr, 20 2015 @ 12:56 PM
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Here is another response from Jonny on his frequently asked questions page.

JumpingJackFlashHypothesis.blogspot.com
By Jonny Mnemonic
It seems as if coastal areas are particularly dangerous, is there any indication that other areas are comparatively better? For example, are mountainous regions better than flat plains, like Ohio, etc.? Not near a "dormant volcano, of course?
There's a good question. It looks to me like LOCAL topography may matter as much as anything else, if not more, and by local I mean like within a mile or two. Best bet would seem to be on the east side of a mountain (most shielded from the wind), overlooking a large plains area that slants down away from you slightly to the east. Then any hydrogen sulfide blowing in from the west would first have to push up over the mountain, and if the winds are strong enough for that then it might just carry OVER you. On the west side of a mountain you might be worse off, because any hydrogen sulfide that DOESN'T make it up over the mountain would roll back down and accumulate. Oh yeah, and good point, don't let that mountain be a volcano. Heh.

For river valleys and the like, it's the opposite. You'd want to be on the WEST side of valleys or canyons. Not as safe as the mountain plan, but I'm in a river valley and I'm not moving. I am on the west side of the valley (good), on a hill (good), one block from a fire station (good), and the hill does overlook a large plain area lower elevation than me (good). No place is going to be perfect, since an atmospheric problem is ubiquitous and there's a lot of chaos and randomness in weather.


Jonny has provided many ideas on little things you can do and big things the world can do. Hopefully, some of these things conferred are already underway. There are many indicators that the government is aware of this unfolding crisis and if that is the case, they are hiding it from us while they attempt to rectify the situation saving civilization. As Jonny points out, if they fail to save us all, you can be assured they are taking steps to insure that mankind somehow does go on by building bunkers in safe places. One must believe that is why the global seed vault was built in the first place. It’s simply a modern day Noah’s Ark.

What else can you do? According to the Last Hours website, there is plenty you can do. Start by signing the global call to action and share it on Facebook to spread the word to your friends. Share it on Twitter as well. There is a video at the Last Hours you can email to your contact list. Here is the link to the website; lasthours.org....

Other ideas the Last Hours website suggests is that you lighten your own carbon load. If we’re going to do anything major, baby steps start at home first. Also, start pressuring the politicians. The more pressure they receive, they’ll wake up and start taking a look at what’s going on.

You can also join a climate campaign group, such as the Arctic Methane Emergency Group or Citizens Concerned about Climate Change. Both of these groups can be found on Facebook for more information.

Since I used Jonny for so much source information in this chapter, it seems only fitting that I quote a call to action by him.

MISA Theory
By Jonny Mnemonic
This is an existential threat and will require immediate worldwide mobilization and unprecedented cooperation to offer any hope for humanity. All is not lost, but there is no time to spare. Act now. Who among us will not be willing to do whatever it takes - bear whatever burden, endure whatever hardship, make whatever sacrifice - in order to preserve our species and civilization? I have no children but I will do whatever is asked to ensure your children have a future. This is the common purpose and love for one another that we must summon now. Put aside anger, recriminations and fear. Gather our finest minds. With strong leadership and a shared imperative we can and will overcome this dragon.

Crazy-sounding ideas may have to be considered. For example, we obviously cannot remove the water from the oceans, refreeze it and put it back. It'd just melt again anyway. But we could deploy, say, a million big dredging machines, each capable of dredging a million tons per day. Or five million. Try to get to the point where sea level is decreasing by removing more mass than is being added. Then take that matter and deposit it somewhere on a thick continental plate. Build some mountains somewhere. Retool factories. We've done it before to kill each other; we can do it now to save each other. Aerosols might buy us some time. We must stop injecting CO2 into the atmosphere quickly. There are many things we can try, and we will probably need all of them. I'm no scientist or seismologist or any kind of -ologist (not even a proctologist). I'm sure scientists and smart people will have other ideas. But...this is urgent. We must get started now.

If we don't act now, then...well, don't make me say it. I won't say it. I can't. I will say only that a multi-year volcanic winter would cause some serious problems. We need to mobilize just as we did for WWII, and then some. We must be as willing to sacrifice as our greatest generation was, and then some. We owe it to the children of today and all following generations to do anything and everything we can to prevent the unspeakable. Please, let us do the right thing.



posted on Apr, 20 2015 @ 01:33 PM
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Maybe you're asking the wrong question. With humans doing so much damage, should we even bother to stop the chain reaction?
Let man fade away and the planet will heal itself.



posted on Apr, 20 2015 @ 01:50 PM
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originally posted by: Hoosierdaddy71
Maybe you're asking the wrong question. With humans doing so much damage, should we even bother to stop the chain reaction?
Let man fade away and the planet will heal itself.


That is true, but it's a sad thought when I just started a family. My thoughts aren't even for myself anymore, they are for my four children.



posted on Apr, 20 2015 @ 06:03 PM
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Great thread/chapter Rez!
Staying tuned in as usual and absorbing all I can. I agree with your thoughts on "Why are they not harvesting" the Methane and after reading your complete post above I can see why to some extent. But they better get off of their arses soon if all this proves true.

The weather where we live is insane to be polite, winds of incredible speeds, NSEW all in a matter of hours. It's the norm now and as I type this we are getting gusts up to 50PH and have been since last night. Temperature swings of 40-50 F in 24 hours is also nothing new for the past few yeas.

Just 6 or 7 years ago we could leave our patio umbrella open all summer day and night and not worry about our chairs and loungers as well. Now we have to strap down the umbrella nightly after use if we were lucky enough to use it that day. Patio furniture gets stacked up against the most protective side of the house or garage nightly as well....that all depends on the weather warnings they are putting out at the time.

Now its a regular thing to have wind warnings posted from Environment Canada and I see no end to this. It is either a dry spell or a monsoon/ No snow or 4 feet/ No wind or it will knock you on your ass/sunny or cloudy for weeks on end/ Very cold or very warm/ very dry air or very humid.....On and on it goes and just to add to my post I have to go shut some windows as it is dropping from 70 F to about 36 as I type.
S&F Rez for your hard work and sharing with us all:-)

Regards, Iwinder



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