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Engineers purify sea and wastewater in 2.5 minutes

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posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 09:09 AM
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I stumbled upon this little gem moments ago and thought I would share. I wasn't sure whether I should place this in Science and Tech, but Fragile Earth seems to me to cover it well via its potential applications. Essentially a team of scientists have discovered a method of purifying any type of polluted water, fresh, or sea including from heavy metals.



A group of Mexican engineers from the Jhostoblak Corporate created technology to recover and purify seawater or wastewater from households, hotels, hospitals, commercial and industrial facilities, regardless of the content of pollutants and microorganisms in just 2.5 minutes.

Read more at: phys.org...

The system, PQUA, works with a mixture of dissociating elements, capable of separating and removing all contaminants, as well as organic and inorganic pollutants. "The methodology is founded on molecularly dissociating water pollutants to recover the minerals necessary and sufficient in order for the human body to function properly nourished," the researchers explained.
Notably, the engineers developed eight dissociating elements, and after extensive testing on different types of contaminated water, implemented a unique methodology that indicates what and how much of each element should be combined.


Read more at: phys.org...

We have been talking a lot lately regarding water, especially as it pertains to the drought out in the Western United States, but also the obvious implications of the radiation spilling out of Fukashima for some years now. They mention precipitating heavy metals etc... and it got me thinking whether or not disassociation of molecules could be used in that case? I am hoping someone with more familiarity than I can come along and make some comments in that regard.

As far as the drought in the Western States goes, could this be a more economic process capable of desalination? I am just speculating, but from all I have read on desal, its costs out weigh its use in very large population centers, I suspect this process would still leave left over salt/brine...but I am just unsure, thoughts?

The environmental remediation applications are huge though, it reads a bit like "Soilant Green" meaning it kinda makes my stomach not trust the process but seriously the implications for many areas of the world like India and Mexico, not to mention the US and others could be huge.



"We have done over 50 tests on different types of wastewater and all have been certified and authorized by the laboratories of the Mexican Accreditation Agency (EMA). Also, the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education (ITESM), the College of Mexico and the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) have given their validation that the water treated with our technology meets the SSA NOM 127 standard, which indicates the parameters and quality characteristics for vital liquid to be used for human consumption," says a Jhostoblak statement.

Read more at: phys.org...


Have a look at the link, its a pretty quick read, I found it both interesting and uplifting.




posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 09:23 AM
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a reply to: BlueJacket

VERY GOOD NEWS!! Thanks for posting this.
This is the sort of thing the world should be working on, not how to best "bomb" each other.

At least some are focusing on positive outcomes.



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 09:27 AM
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a reply to: BlueJacket

sounds promising. sandf for you.

i'll keep an eye on this

best wishes f.




posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 09:49 AM
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Had high hopes and S&F for your effort. However, it's all about the money. And why isn't it being used already?


Moreover, the company reports that this development is protected under trade secret in America and will soon have the same status in Switzerland. Its implementation in the market will depend on the needs of users and the issue of new laws regarding use and consumption of water discharge.

Read more at: phys.org...



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 10:19 AM
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a reply to: StoutBroux

Yes, like many things in this world it does boil down to money, but this is a very new development and I would like to think that some of the hold ups is additional studies regarding human consumption being safe and healthy.

What I am most happy with, is the work is being done and it is much needed, how the monied interests try to make a buck on it is yet to be seen.



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 10:20 AM
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Very good find OP. It sounds promising. I wonder just how expensive the process is? It sounds like they say it would not be feasible for large cities. But if it goes through the normal procedure then this process it might be viable to treat waste water.

Right now, most of the meds we pee out go into the sewers and the sewer plants do not take care of a lot of these with their system of cleaning the water. So they go into the rivers. Now, many meds are often metal ion based, so they might be able to be extracted. Once the metal bonds are disrupted, the rest might fall apart.



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 11:07 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

interesting. I must of missed the large city bit, kinda blows up my thinking in regards a replacement for de-sal in larger population centers. I agree that the prospects for cleaning our municipal drinking water of pharmas will be greatly advantageous. It makes me happy to be on my own well.

Any ideas how this could, or coud not be used in relationship to nuclear radiation? As I said, that particular arena of science isn't my strongest suit. I appreciate your jumping in.



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 11:48 AM
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Being able to clean water is obviously desirable, but it would be better if we stopped polluting it.



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 11:54 AM
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a reply to: VoidHawk
Every industrial process that involves water involves some effect which pollutes it and produces waste to be dealt with.
Every shower you take, everytime you do a clothes washing load, everytime you jetwash your yard, or clean your car, pollutes water. A world where we do not pollute any water is a pipe dream at best.

Ideas such as this seem to be the way forward if they are commercially possible.



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 12:29 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand
a reply to: VoidHawk
Every industrial process that involves water involves some effect which pollutes it and produces waste to be dealt with.
Every shower you take, everytime you do a clothes washing load, everytime you jetwash your yard, or clean your car, pollutes water. A world where we do not pollute any water is a pipe dream at best.

Ideas such as this seem to be the way forward if they are commercially possible.

Most natural pollutants will degrade and be lost through the earths natural water (filtration) cycles, my comment was aimed at the more nasty pollutants because most of those do not degrade or get filtered by the normal cycle, thats why 70% of british people are peeing out weedkiller.



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 12:35 PM
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a reply to: VoidHawk Yep, plus estrogen and many other med's we havent actually taken ourselves.
I agree mate, fresh water is something I rely on the state to provide me, and while better than many countries it ain't pure, that's for sure.
Anything that can clean our water up is an investment I support, every time.



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 01:37 PM
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a reply to: BlueJacket

settlement containers would be increasingly irradiated is the possible downside to it's use in remediation process involving radionucliedes. perhaps nano carbon filtration sheeting prior to settlement container would capture the particulates before entering the apparatus. possible downside here would be vast quantities needed.

f.



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 03:41 PM
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There's a similar process described here:

www.gizmag.com...

It need sodium hydroxide in one tank, and an electric current run through the other. But it doesn't solve the problem of desalination.



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 05:05 PM
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a reply to: BlueJacketI don't know if this would work with radiation.

Could you immagine how much it would cost to build plants like this in a city the size of Chicago? Now, they could set some up at some big users to take the crap out of wastewater and reuse it, but just recharging or cleaning/flushing the units would take some time. It works fast, but when you are talking of millions of people, fast is never fast enough.



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 06:06 PM
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Fascinating news...

I'll never forget the day that Southern California announced their new TTT Program, which stood for "Toilet To Tap". Everyone (including myself) in the lounge we were at cringed.

I truly hope this and other similar-like forms of contaminated-water removal comes to fruition.



posted on Apr, 20 2015 @ 01:31 AM
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originally posted by: VoidHawk
Being able to clean water is obviously desirable, but it would be better if we stopped polluting it.


Well, the only real way to stop it is for all of us to basically quit living. We can engineer it to be better but no way to make it go away. The animal kingdom shows us cases of animals polluting their own habitats or overeating it and having die offs that are a result. One example we see this when deer overeat their habitat or another would be fish in isolated waters producing too much Nitrates and reducing the oxygen available.
edit on 20-4-2015 by Justoneman because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 20 2015 @ 01:04 PM
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This is an amazing step in the right direction but along the lines of cleaning radiation I found this information about the radiation being taken out of the water with the use of crystals www.cosmicstarseeds.com...-1259



posted on Apr, 20 2015 @ 01:33 PM
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a reply to: ResearchNOWknowledge

has this been verified by independent observers (non-bias) yet? I cannot watch the clip.
2nd

f



posted on Apr, 20 2015 @ 03:57 PM
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Not that I know of... If anyone with spectroscopy and MRN equipment can PM me so we can test it ourselves. The researcher at IBM in San Jose did a lot of work with crystals, Dr. Marcel Vogel... I think there is something to this
reply to: fakedirt

edit on 20-4-2015 by ResearchNOWknowledge because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2015 @ 07:33 AM
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a reply to: ResearchNOWknowledge

the source emitters in suspension are the problem. I cannot see how crystals can deal with reducing/absorbing/destroying these particulates as well as the issue of tritium.

for me this comes under the heading of photodeactivation which I researched many years ago. sadly it came to a dead end.

f




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