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Does Your Child's Teacher Brainwash Them?

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posted on Apr, 17 2015 @ 03:16 PM
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Does teachers indoctrinate our kids? My answer is yes absolutely.

My experience was an art teacher teaching art interpretation by showing a small girl holding an M-16 rifle to the back of an American soldier. Where my concern peeks, it was the same high school in Cincinnati that produced a jihadist last year.

The school's response was to dismiss it as artful expression after it had already produces one terrorist.




posted on Apr, 17 2015 @ 03:17 PM
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originally posted by: WeAreAWAKE

originally posted by: redhorse
a reply to: WeAreAWAKE

Yes, but I live in a fairly conservative area so I have actually had "brainwashing" on both sides of that culture divide. The most notable instances off the top of my head were when a teacher's aid shamed my daughter (in front of her peers) because she didn't go to church, and when her English teacher decided that some sort of Community Service needed to be a major part of the curriculum instead of you know... actually teaching English. Both of these had me spitting nails and I darned well did it in their direction too. I got an apology on the first and she never brought religion up to her again by God (pun intended), and the English teacher ah... "compromised" on the second because I wasn't having it.




And that shouldn't happen. Should there be a rule or law where the teachers are told up front NOT to do this type of thing and if they do...they can be fired and have been forewarned?


You know... I don't know. I just don't. I think that these teachers should know better, but people are people I guess. Every time someone says "There aughta be a law..." I get nervous. I think maybe these things can be addressed on the local level. If parents get noisy enough school boards can change school policy. That might be enough.



posted on Apr, 17 2015 @ 03:18 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: AllSourceIntel

Woah! Did we make that conscious decision? We are told which schools our children will attend, unless we have the luxury of being able to find the extra funding and/or time in our budgets to either homeschool or pay for private schooling.

Otherwise, there is precious little "choice" involved.


You made a conscious choice to have sex, keep a baby, raise it, live where you do, work as you do, and school your child as you do. There is plenty of choice involved. Many schools have waivers for attendance if outside a district, scholarships can be attained for private school, and their are neighborhood networks of home schooling where parents take turns and days. There is always discussing of both parents truly need to work, if one can work more hours and the other less, or if one can do a good amount of work from home. Plenty of choice.



posted on Apr, 17 2015 @ 03:19 PM
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originally posted by: redhorse

originally posted by: WeAreAWAKE

originally posted by: redhorse
a reply to: WeAreAWAKE

Yes, but I live in a fairly conservative area so I have actually had "brainwashing" on both sides of that culture divide. The most notable instances off the top of my head were when a teacher's aid shamed my daughter (in front of her peers) because she didn't go to church, and when her English teacher decided that some sort of Community Service needed to be a major part of the curriculum instead of you know... actually teaching English. Both of these had me spitting nails and I darned well did it in their direction too. I got an apology on the first and she never brought religion up to her again by God (pun intended), and the English teacher ah... "compromised" on the second because I wasn't having it.




And that shouldn't happen. Should there be a rule or law where the teachers are told up front NOT to do this type of thing and if they do...they can be fired and have been forewarned?


You know... I don't know. I just don't. I think that these teachers should know better, but people are people I guess. Every time someone says "There aughta be a law..." I get nervous. I think maybe these things can be addressed on the local level. If parents get noisy enough school boards can change school policy. That might be enough.

Good enough...lets make it a rule that you can be fired for as opposed as a law. I will meet you half way.



posted on Apr, 17 2015 @ 03:24 PM
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originally posted by: WeAreAWAKE
But that doesn't change my opinion that a teacher should not impose their views as an authority to a student.


Human's are humans. They're going to express themselves in everyday life.

I say it depends on the degree.

If a teacher consistently pushes an ideology - - then I think it becomes a real problem. And believe me - - I have no qualms about going to the school authorities.

A real problem to me would be pushing religion. I'm not going to object to: "God Bless You", or "I'll say a prayer", even though I do object. Unless it is an everyday thing.

I raised my 2 (now in their 40s), helped raise a foster teen, 22 year old grandson, now a 15 year old granddaughter, and a 7 year old grandson.



posted on Apr, 17 2015 @ 03:24 PM
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originally posted by: Hoosierdaddy71
History is rarely just facts and is always taught with a slant one way or another.
Science will have climate, creation and evolution opinions.
Reading will be taught occasionally with books based in political agendas.
So yeah, your kid is being exposed to the agendas of the teachers.
But it's up to the parents to raise the kids in the best way they see even with the influence of others.
I would not want my kid to only hear my views of the world, but to hear everything and make up her own mind.


show me a teacher in a public school that teaches their own agenda, and I'll show you a teacher that is in hot water, being disciplined, or already fired for doing that. parents soon learn, and raise hell that the teacher is not following school district, city, county, or state educational guidelines. maybe you can point out where all of these "teacher agendas" are happening in public schools.....in private, and/or religious schools, I am ignorant of how outspoken the opinions of teachers can be, so they may be quite different.



posted on Apr, 17 2015 @ 03:27 PM
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a reply to: WeAreAWAKE
Let us flip this upside down for some fun, perspective, and insight.

Suppose the legislators pull the fourth amendment ... would you want your student to get the fact from the teacher past and present (whatever present facts came about to take away the amendment) or would you want that teacher to interject their opinion on why the fourth should have remained and be brought back? Keep in mind, that teacher is very likely to be asked their opinion specifically.



posted on Apr, 17 2015 @ 03:30 PM
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If a teacher consistently pushes an ideology - - then I think it becomes a real problem. And believe me - - I have no qualms about going to the school authorities.

I Agree
with this.



posted on Apr, 17 2015 @ 06:08 PM
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a reply to: WeAreAWAKE

They probably paid for that mosiac with a special tax assessment added to the property taxes. It seems that schools are always doing that now, they spend all their allotment per student on teachers and retirees and benefits. They do a bare minimum with the governments money and talk people into more taxes at the local level. I thought the government money they get for each student was supposed to cover everything.



posted on Apr, 17 2015 @ 06:31 PM
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a reply to: Annee

The conditioning of kids is necessary. It is written subtly into the textbooks. The government chooses what is to be taught. The teachers get creative but only within certain guidelines.

Even just teaching kids they have to go to school is important. When they get out, they need to show up at work. They need to accomplish what the employers want them to. So school conditions kids to be workers just by getting them used to putting in time somewhere. The list goes on and on. If you examine the policies and the required teachings, you might be able to pick up different trends that can be applied to responsible work ethics.

Even if you consider that kids are taught to do what teachers say and if they work hard at accomplishing these things, their grades will be better and they get a chance at a better job. Think about that for a minute. A person working a good paying job should produce something for the employer. The kids who worked hard and did decent would possibly do more than those who slacked off in school. The problem is that this does not account for the fact that a very intelligent person would get bored with school and desire to learn things with more practical applications. And others who work very hard and would make great workers with creativity do not get picked for the jobs because their grades aren't up to par.

I can go on and on. The tests are designed to find out if you do what your told, not necessarily to judge intellect. Being able to memorize things is not as good as being able to properly interpret things. Yet the ones who can memorize are getting better grades. Two different types of intellect here. I know people who know lots but cannot figure out anything on their own without instructions. Others can take things apart in their minds and figure out how they work. They can engineer almost anything, seeing stress factors automatically and can create new things. This country does not really want to have people around that can create things on their own, they want consumers who are in need of others services in society.

So stick the ones in high paying jobs who can't fix their car or build their home. They will do better at stimulating the economy.

There are some very good people setting these things up based on what is needed by the country. They like people who will blow their money back into circulation, people who can't do things on their own.

I could go on and on with hundreds of ways that school programs kids and rewards them for learning what is taught. Most of the shops and trades classes are gone from high schools up here now. You have to go to school after high school to get experience in these trades.



posted on Apr, 17 2015 @ 06:34 PM
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a reply to: Annee

The conditioning of kids is necessary. It is written subtly into the textbooks. The government chooses what is to be taught. The teachers get creative but only within certain guidelines.

Even just teaching kids they have to go to school is important. When they get out, they need to show up at work. They need to accomplish what the employers want them to. So school conditions kids to be workers just by getting them used to putting in time somewhere. The list goes on and on. If you examine the policies and the required teachings, you might be able to pick up different trends that can be applied to responsible work ethics.

Even if you consider that kids are taught to do what teachers say and if they work hard at accomplishing these things, their grades will be better and they get a chance at a better job. Think about that for a minute. A person working a good paying job should produce something for the employer. The kids who worked hard and did decent would possibly do more than those who slacked off in school. The problem is that this does not account for the fact that a very intelligent person would get bored with school and desire to learn things with more practical applications. And others who work very hard and would make great workers with creativity do not get picked for the jobs because their grades aren't up to par.

I can go on and on. The tests are designed to find out if you do what your told, not necessarily to judge intellect. Being able to memorize things is not as good as being able to properly interpret things. Yet the ones who can memorize are getting better grades. Two different types of intellect here. I know people who know lots but cannot figure out anything on their own without instructions. Others can take things apart in their minds and figure out how they work. They can engineer almost anything, seeing stress factors automatically and can create new things. This country does not really want to have people around that can create things on their own, they want consumers who are in need of others services in society.

So stick the ones in high paying jobs who can't fix their car or build their home. They will do better at stimulating the economy.

There are some very good people setting these things up based on what is needed by the country. They like people who will blow their money back into circulation, people who can't do things on their own.

I could go on and on with hundreds of ways that school programs kids and rewards them for learning what is taught. Most of the shops and trades classes are gone from high schools up here now. You have to go to school after high school to get experience in these trades.



posted on Apr, 17 2015 @ 08:00 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

I am not anti-government.

I support an organized society.

I definitely support a public school system - - as it does provide the opportunity for every child to have a basic education.

-----------------------------------------------

Do you have an alternative for the 50 million school children in America?



posted on Apr, 17 2015 @ 09:50 PM
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originally posted by: Annee
a reply to: rickymouse

I am not anti-government.

I support an organized society.

I definitely support a public school system - - as it does provide the opportunity for every child to have a basic education.

-----------------------------------------------

Do you have an alternative for the 50 million school children in America?


No, I don't have an alternative. I also think much of the conditioning is good both for society and also the kids so they can fit into society when they graduate. But not all kids are meant to go to college. We need to create manufacturing jobs for them, jobs that are not highly technologically advanced. Otherwise they will be working at a low paying job and be collecting foodstamps. They won't be paying taxes either, part of which supports our schools.

The underlying problem is the loss of factories producing stuff Americans use in their daily life. I have worked in a factory and it wasn't bad. Decent pay and benefits, decent working conditions. I did get tired of it after about a year and three months, but that is because I needed to go out and learn more. I learned many professions after that, getting paid for learning instead of paying for learning. We also need to not judge people who work at a factory as substandard. People with high educations tend to think they are a little better than those without an education and deserve better compensation. That is far from the truth. We are all equal, our knowledge does not make us better than others as many feel.

I see kids coming out of school expecting big bucks right away. When I grew up you started at a reduced wage and built your way up. Within a couple of years you had a decent wage and some vacation, and after six months you had good insurance. Now, because of the tendency of people going to the doctor every time they sneeze, the insurance premiums have got out of hand. So nobody is getting raises anymore. Many factories shut down in this country, these people were not on food stamps either.



posted on Apr, 17 2015 @ 10:37 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

Surprisingly


We are mostly in agreement.

I'm late for something, so gotta boogie.



posted on Apr, 18 2015 @ 12:04 AM
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My father taught at a private school that I could not afford to attend (I went to public school). He was and still is very liberal. The majority of the parents of his students were rich conservatives. He taught humanities, in a very liberal way too, to young impressionable minds. Many of these parents were not fond of his teaching methods, mostly because he had these children challenging the belief systems they were raised on.

I'm not sure what my real point is here, other than I can relate to parents thinking teachers are messing with their kid's minds. I just have a story from the shoe on another foot



posted on Apr, 18 2015 @ 03:55 AM
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a reply to: WeAreAWAKE

Facts can't be conveyed without also including an opinion on those facts in order to give them context. For example, what happens when you cover a political election? Or the motivations behind the Civil War? Or the arguments for and against the Second Amendment? At some point you have to look at some of these things and point out that Columbine for example wouldn't have happened without a Second Amendment. That's opinion since it's just a hypothetical, but it's also overwhelmingly likely to be true. Similarly you can point out that due to the Second Amendment the whole Bundy Ranch fiasco had a better result.

As far as education being brainwashing, how else would you do it? Any time you give a person a whole bunch of information to learn and apply you're using brainwashing. No one has come up with an educational system where that isn't the case.

On your daughters comment, look at the wars and special ops actions that happened under Reagan, HW, and W. Now look at them under Clinton and Obama. Both sides have a few, but the Republicans have had way more. Or you could look at the current crop of lobbying targets by defense contractors and they're primarily Republican.

I would say your daughters teacher told her the truth. Republicans don't have a monopoly on war, but they sure do seem to try and cause more of them in recent history.



posted on Apr, 18 2015 @ 03:58 AM
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You are brainwashed.



posted on Apr, 18 2015 @ 04:31 AM
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My wife is a teacher. She teaches facts. And science. Reality in other words.



posted on Apr, 18 2015 @ 05:10 AM
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originally posted by: WeAreAWAKE
OK...this is a fairly simple set of questions and opinions. A teacher is supposed to teach children facts. Math, reading, writing, history, etc. And the vast majority of teachers (from what I have experienced and read) are left leaning, politically. I find that my own daughters being presented with liberal opinions by their teachers and sometimes anti-right propaganda.

I have read about and have personally seen enough to know that liberal teachers like to express, and sometimes force their opinions upon their students. Maybe right-wing teachers do the same, but they are in the vast minority.


Absolutely. My personal experience has been exactly the same. My parents sent me to a private church school for the first few years and most of the teachers there were (more or less) conservatives.

As soon as I switched to public school, the wave of liberalism that hit me was so blatant I couldn't deny it if I tried. Absolutely public school teachers are overwhelmingly liberal. And most of them are not shy about it at all. They will take every opportunity to expose the students to blatantly slanted "information" in class. I'd venture a guess that their political views are actually what drives most of them to be teachers to start with. They know indoctrination has to start early.



posted on Apr, 18 2015 @ 05:51 AM
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originally posted by: BrianFlanders

originally posted by: WeAreAWAKE
OK...this is a fairly simple set of questions and opinions. A teacher is supposed to teach children facts. Math, reading, writing, history, etc. And the vast majority of teachers (from what I have experienced and read) are left leaning, politically. I find that my own daughters being presented with liberal opinions by their teachers and sometimes anti-right propaganda.

I have read about and have personally seen enough to know that liberal teachers like to express, and sometimes force their opinions upon their students. Maybe right-wing teachers do the same, but they are in the vast minority.


Absolutely. My personal experience has been exactly the same. My parents sent me to a private church school for the first few years and most of the teachers there were (more or less) conservatives.

As soon as I switched to public school, the wave of liberalism that hit me was so blatant I couldn't deny it if I tried. Absolutely public school teachers are overwhelmingly liberal. And most of them are not shy about it at all. They will take every opportunity to expose the students to blatantly slanted "information" in class. I'd venture a guess that their political views are actually what drives most of them to be teachers to start with. They know indoctrination has to start early.


I'm sorry, but what you're saying is that you went from a highly conservative, right-wing and reactionary school to a place that wasn't - and you're surprised that the teachers were different? My wife is a teacher and she has taught in both the USA and the UK. She loves educating people by telling them about the world as a whole. If you accused her of indoctrinating her children you'd get the glare of death, followed by a tongue lashing.




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