It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Acorn Bread - a Forager's Delight from Homemade (and free) Acorn Flour!

page: 2
25
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 17 2015 @ 05:37 PM
link   
a reply to: OpinionatedB

Awesome info!!!! Thanks for the topic...

Dave Wendell's (co host of the ATS Live "Bushcraft on Fire" show),wife Tam has a video with an alternate method of processing the acorns to leech the tannins in your kitchen.. here is the link in case you are interested.


www.youtube.com...

Tam starts out with a couple of minutes of Oak ID then later on get's into her blender method..




posted on Apr, 17 2015 @ 05:38 PM
link   
a reply to: JacKatMtn

Oh very cool! Thank you for the video!



posted on Apr, 17 2015 @ 06:04 PM
link   
a reply to: OpinionatedB

We have a couple of big white oak trees and a half a dozen big red oak trees on our property. If I were to go get all the acorns, I probably would only get a bushel of acorns. By the time I shelled and boiled them then dried them I would only have about three or four gallons. That probably would only make about fifteen pounds of flour.



posted on Apr, 17 2015 @ 06:26 PM
link   
a reply to: rickymouse

Then you might like to learn how to distill it for the acorn oil...

www.youtube.com...

which sells for 17.00 for 4 ounces of the stuff, and is used to attract deer and bear and also masks human scent.. (expensive stuff.. and useful for the hunter too!)

store.kishelscents.com...



posted on Apr, 18 2015 @ 02:43 AM
link   
a reply to: Ksihkehe

Thanks for the link, I love that kind of reading.

My removals from the "contaminated" area has been by bulk digging from the area, and removal to a licensed processor.

Some roots have travelled 10 metres along a wall base, and 3.5 metres down. We have removed 126 loads, totalling 2520 metric tonnes of spoil.

An graded embankment is not being dug, and will be part of our spraying program, this is where the sweet plant is still growing.

Now to read more about Jim Duke...



posted on Apr, 18 2015 @ 07:42 AM
link   
i've been talking this over with the wife.

most of what we have here are live oak. the acorns are quite small, and shaped somewhat like an almond. You can find them all over the place where people would have planted them.

natural growing trees....all we have are mesquites, and some cedars in the creeks and drainage channels. That said...you can make some really tasty food with mesquite beans.



posted on Apr, 18 2015 @ 08:39 AM
link   
a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

The live oak acorns are ones that people say need almost no processing... those almond shaped ones..

you might gather up one or two, shell them and taste one - if they are sweet and not bitter you wont need to process them for use, if they have a tiny bit of bitterness then it wont take much to process..

I don't have any of those here, we have both white and red oak, white oak taking some but not a lot of processing and those were the ones I had used..so I cannot say anything about the live oak other than what I read.. but supposedly those are some of the best acorns to use if you have them in your area..

I have never had a mesquite bean.. sounds cool! we do have shagbark hickory here and this fall I will be gathering those up and doing some toasting for use in cookies and breads and whatnot.. as well as gathering up more of the acorns!



posted on Apr, 18 2015 @ 10:35 AM
link   
a reply to: OpinionatedB

its a flour stretching food.

flour has those glutens that bind so much better than other grains.



posted on Apr, 18 2015 @ 11:22 AM
link   
I thought this was about the ACORN Obama tie in. I need to take a breath and relax.
edit on 18-4-2015 by LOSTinAMERICA because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 08:03 AM
link   
OB....i sent you a message



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 08:17 AM
link   

originally posted by: LOSTinAMERICA
I thought this was about the ACORN Obama tie in. I need to take a breath and relax.


My bad.. I should have worked in "nonpartisan" into the title alongside the words flour, homemade and bread..

lesson learned..


Sometimes we all need a nice break... I have done the same thing before, no worries.. but it was cute so I couldn't resist being slightly sarcastic..

take care.. and thanks for stopping by and giving me something to smile about!



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 12:29 PM
link   
Hi B, here's a link to an old thread of mine about Oaks and acorns, along with pics to help tell white oaks from red and edible vs inedible acorns. Some other good info as well - www.abovetopsecret.com...

Cheers,
ATA



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 07:55 PM
link   
a reply to: Asktheanimals

Thank you! I'm gonna give that thread a read..



posted on Apr, 20 2015 @ 10:08 PM
link   
a reply to: OpinionatedB

I meant to add that here in Virginia the Chestnut Oak is your best species for acorns, they're huge and quite mild in comparison to most, so much so that I like to eat a few raw (not many as they can back you up). Easy tree to identify as the leaves resemble Chestnut leaves and the bark has a unique pattern. Very common in these parts as well. Since the real Chestnuts are gone it's the one oak every survivalist or prepper should get to know.

The tannins boiled off from the acorns can be used as a wash for various skin problems, poison ivy as well as tanning leather.



posted on Apr, 21 2015 @ 04:04 PM
link   
a reply to: Asktheanimals

okay cool.. I hunt down some pictures of those so I can recognise them..thank you very much! (I just checked and we have a great big huge one of those! I will be gathering from that tree next time!)

I did NOT know that the tannins were good for poison ivy.. I am allergic to ivy so that will come in very handy to know! Lye soap usually helps me if I wash immediately after coming inside.. but its good to have an alternative too!
edit on 21-4-2015 by OpinionatedB because: (no reason given)




top topics



 
25
<< 1   >>

log in

join