It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The shocking (and stomach-churning) secret inside EVERY fig

page: 5
45
<< 2  3  4    6  7  8 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 09:47 AM
link   
a reply to: PhoenixOD

It's not so bad, consider it a protein boost. Perhaps a hot cup of bird guano coffee would be a good to wash down them figs.




posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 10:39 AM
link   
It's a bigger concern for Vegans really as opposed to Vegetarians. Vegetarians know foods have at least insect remnants in them choosing to forgo that fact that unlike Vegans who consume no animal products.

Many have surely wondered why there's a crunch when eating figs, fig bars or trail mix?


However, the crunchy things in figs really are just seeds. The young wasps develop inside the fig as it ripens then hatch and mate all within the fruit. The young females then exit the fig before it is completely ripe. However, there aren’t wasp eggs or remnants in ripe figs, because figs produce a protein-digesting enzyme that digests any wasps or eggs left inside. By the time we eat a fig, the wasps have done their work and flown away or were digested by the developing fig.
Source

I dunno about digested fully by the enzymes, according this:

Other foods contain insects and pieces as well.

The FDA’s Defect Levels Handbook lays it all out. Staples like broccoli, canned tomatoes, and hops readily contain “insect fragments”—heads, thoraxes, and legs—and even whole insects. (I won’t tell you about the rat hair limits…) Fig paste can harbor up to 13 insect heads in 100 grams; canned fruit juices can contain a maggot for every 250 milliliters; 10 grams of hops can be the home for 2,500 aphids (pictured above).
Source2

Could the crunch still be their heads
Never seemed seed-like to me.
edit on 14-4-2015 by dreamingawake because: quote issues



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 10:39 AM
link   
Interesting, though not off putting for me even though I'm vegetarian.
Being a biker for decades I reckon that this 'vegetarian' has inadvertantly consumed a fair few kilos of insects on my travels.

That is NOT me in pic btw!

All life is theft and barring photosynthesis relies on death to survive in some form be it in the form of soil/compost or eating meat etc. You should see the bugs and slugs that my chickens devour daily but would anyone not eat chicken because of it nah! and what fish consume would literally turn your stomach but no one gives a fig about it!



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 12:44 PM
link   
Hmmm I wonder how many other bugs we consume in Processed food !


I work in the fishing industry and let me just tell you ....

Ill only eat fish that I catch and can inspect !

I have seen many many parasites that just passed along and end up on your plate at a sushi restaurant.


fig -wasp pffft...............nom nom nom extra Protein !!!!!!!!!


edit on 14-4-2015 by Kapusta because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 01:04 PM
link   
a reply to: PhoenixOD

Dont be a soft fanny. Just about all plants and animals we eat ingest other plants and animals



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 01:08 PM
link   

originally posted by: Sunwolf

originally posted by: Char-Lee
How strange tat I never saw any wasps in or near the trees in all the years we had them around our home.

You would think you would also see a wasp inside now and again as often you open ones that are not totally ripe, but never ever once saw one, we are talking what many hundreds of figs per tree, so a person should see some wasps?


The wasps involved are very tiny,most wasps believe it or not are tiny,a hand lens is required to identify them.The common wasp that most people are thinking of is another matter.

en.wikipedia.org...


Ah well not all figs need the wasp it seems.




Some types of fig that are grown for human consumption have figs that ripen without pollination. It is also possible to trick plants into ripening figs without wasps by spraying them with plant hormones.

askabiologist.asu.edu...


According to a 2006 Science study, these domesticated sterile figs could be evidence of the first use of horticulture in human history. The researchers discovered carbonized fig fruits in “an early Neolithic village, located in the Lower Jordan Valley, which dates to 11,400 to 11,200 years ago”—nearly one thousand years before cereal domestication. The commercially cultivated fig tree is usually a female parthenocarpic variety of the ancient common fig (Ficus carica) and does not need pollination to produce fruit.
On the other hand, those species of fig trees that rely on wasps for pollination will likely contain bits of wasps in the fruit.

www.esa.org...

Interesting conversation here:



I am new to growing figs and I am trying to come up with a long list of common figs that do not need wasps for production of the main crop. Does anyone have such a list that I can get off of them. Everyone's information is much appreciated. Thanks.

figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com...


Russ, you might be better off with a list of which figs DO need the wasp. That is a small list! Majority of figs are common and self pollinate.

I'm sure someone here can help you. We have the wasp here in California, so this isn't a big concern, but those who live in PA and colder climates can help you for sure.

I'd go for Hardy Chicago and Marseilles VS Black if I lived in PA.




posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 01:09 PM
link   
a reply to: PhoenixOD

According to this biologist your OP is wrong



Most commercial figs, like the ones you buy at the store, are grown without wasps.

askabiologist.asu.edu...

It seems dried figs mostly have wasp pollinators and fresh do not.



A common concern among humans is whether we eat fig wasps when we consume figs. The short answer is yes for dried figs and usually no for fresh figs. The fig species that is eaten is the domesticated fig Ficus carica, which has been in cultivation for thousands of years. It occurs naturally in the Mediterranean region, but is also cultivated in this area as well as in various other parts of the world where there is a suitable climate, such as California and South Africa.

www.figweb.org...




Fortunately for the backyard fig grower, most fig varieties do not require pollination by wasps.

www.plantanswers.com...
edit on 14-4-2015 by Char-Lee because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 01:13 PM
link   

originally posted by: TinfoilTP
This begs the age old question, what came first, the wasp or the fig?

Organisms don't just suddenly appear from nothing, so that question is nonsensical.



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 02:29 PM
link   
a reply to: PhoenixOD

My Mum hates the idea of eating bugs,but has enjoyed figs for decades..

She's going to love this info I show her just while she's eating a fig.
Mwhaaahahaha.


Ah,no I really couldn't do it to her-sometimes ignorance is bliss.



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 03:01 PM
link   
a reply to: Sunwolf

Thanks for that info

So only one variety of figs need wasps

We have 3 fig trees ... never seen a wasp ever



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 03:28 PM
link   
Meh! At least, the plant digested the wasp first.

I read recently that potatoes, tomatoes and a few other garden plants were carnivorous. It seems hairy plants use some technique ( poison I think ) to kill insects and absorb them through their roots, instead of the flower like carnivorous ones we usually know.

Like a previous poster said, what will the vegetarians do now that we know that lots of plants themselves "EAT MEAT"?, well at least, animal proteins... lol

And eating the fig isn't different than eating the numerous food stuff that contains other types of insects.

Google images insect candy



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 03:40 PM
link   
a reply to: Char-Lee

You said


It seems dried figs mostly have wasp pollinators and fresh do not.


But your own source quote said.



A common concern among humans is whether we eat fig wasps when we consume figs. The short answer is yes for dried figs and usually no for fresh figs.


From what i can make out most commercial figs are dried.


Types of Figs

There are four distinct types of figs: Common Fig, Caprifig, Smyrna, and San Pedro.

Common Figs are the only figs significant to commercial growers in Texas. These figs develop parthenocarpically (without pollination) and are by far the most prevalent type of fig grown in Texas. The fruit does not have true seeds and is primarily produced on wood from the current season. Most varieties recommended for Texas are of the Common Fig type.

Caprifigs produce a small non-edible fruit; however, the flowers inside the Caprifig product pollen. This pollen is essential for fertilizing fruit of the Smyrna and San Pedro types. The pollen is transported from the Caprifig to the pollen-sterile types by a Blastophaga wasp. Commercial growers hang baskets of Blastophaga-infested Caprifigs so that the wasps can effectively fertilize the fruit. Caprifigs were grown successfully at Del Rio, Texas, as early as 1901.

Smyrna Fig varieties produce large edible fruit with true seeds. The Blastophaga wasp and Capriifigs are required for pollination and normal fruit development. If this fertilization process does not occur, fruit will not develop properly and will fall from the tree. Smyrna-type figs are commonly sold as dried figs.

San Pedro type figs bear two crops of fruit in one season – one crop on the previous season’s growth and a second crop on current growth. The first crop, called the Breba crop, is parthenocarpic and does not require pollination. Fruit of the second crop is the Smyrna type and requires pollination from the Caprifig. Breba crops are produced early in the spring on last season’s wood. However, the second crop of Smyrna type may fail to set because of lack of pollination from Blastophaga and Caprifig. This second crop fruit drop frequently discourages homeowners.





edit on 14-4-2015 by PhoenixOD because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 03:49 PM
link   

originally posted by: Bedlam
I thought this was common knowledge.

Some bugs are pretty ok. I think my favorite snack bug is ants. Some are peppery, some are tart, depends on the pile.


What would have given you that impression?

I've never seen a fig tree, but from several accounts here in this thread even those with fig trees have failed to acquire this knowledge. It's definitely news to me and I have a pretty good handle on common knowledge. I love this kind of tidbit and I am disappointed I failed to know.

Maybe it's just a deficiency in the common knowledge of Americans (I got the impression in this thread that maybe some international members believed this to be common knowledge)?



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 05:13 PM
link   

originally posted by: BeefNoMeat
What would have given you that impression?

I've never seen a fig tree, but from several accounts here in this thread even those with fig trees have failed to acquire this knowledge. It's definitely news to me and I have a pretty good handle on common knowledge. I love this kind of tidbit and I am disappointed I failed to know.


I'm pretty sure I knew as a yoot. Then again, I was a farm kid, deep into FFA and 4H, and we had a fig patch which magically transformed into many pints of preserves yearly. The secret trick to fig preserves is slicing up lemons into it in paper thin sections, sort of like a marmalade.

If you didn't know about figs, wait until you discover what Jello is.



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 05:20 PM
link   
a reply to: Bedlam




The secret trick to fig preserves is slicing up lemons into it in paper thin sections, sort of like a marmalade.


Thanks for that secret ... if we have any spare figs for preserving ... I will remember that ... though they are greedily consumed as soon as ripe ...



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 05:53 PM
link   

originally posted by: artistpoet
a reply to: Bedlam




The secret trick to fig preserves is slicing up lemons into it in paper thin sections, sort of like a marmalade.


Thanks for that secret ... if we have any spare figs for preserving ... I will remember that ... though they are greedily consumed as soon as ripe ...


You can also use the zest and juice, but the O'Bedlam Family version of fig preserves is a sort of fig/lemon marmalade. Gives it a more complex flavor.



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 05:56 PM
link   
a reply to: Bedlam




You can also use the zest and juice, but the O'Bedlam Family version of fig preserves is a sort of fig/lemon marmalade. Gives it a more complex flavor.


The O'Bedlam preserve sounds delicious ...



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 06:01 PM
link   
Everyone would stop eating if they knew how many foodstuffs contained bugs or bug parts.

Time to just enjoy the deliciousness of foods and snak them down.

Think about that, and when you wake up with a funny crunch in your mouth just be satisfied that it was probably a spider that crawled into its final resting spot while you snored.



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 06:28 PM
link   
a reply to: PhoenixOD

I don't get this?



You said
It seems dried figs mostly have wasp pollinators and fresh do not.

But your own source quote said.

A common concern among humans is whether we eat fig wasps when we consume figs. The short answer is yes for dried figs and usually no for fresh figs.

Same thing dried yes wasp.... fresh no wasp.

From what i can make out most commercial figs are dried.




The shocking (and stomach-churning) secret inside EVERY fig (no actually we have choices and most figs are not the wasp pollinated variety.)


The great thing is most figs people eat from their own trees are not full of wasps and also there are commercial fresh figs in the stores.


In the case of the common fig the flowers are all female and need no pollination.




Persistent (or common) figs have all female flowers that do not need pollination for fruiting; the fruit can develop through parthenocarpic means. This is a popular horticulture fig for home gardeners. Dottato (Kadota), Black Mission, Brown Turkey, Brunswick, and Celeste are some representative cultivars.
en.wikipedia.org...

Texas it said grows for commercial use only common figs and so do many other states but Ca seems to have some of the wasp variety as they are supposedly better tasting and probably stronger taste when dried. The seeded type like they use in fig newtons.



Delicious Figs In California's Central Valley
The World's Most Delicious Figs Require A Tiny
Symbiotic Wasp To Pollinate Its Minute Flowers

waynesword.palomar.edu...



Caducous (or Smyrna) figs require cross pollination by the fig wasp with pollen from caprifigs for the fruit to mature. If not pollinated the immature fruits drop. Some cultivars are Smyrne (Lob Incir in Turkey) - (Calimyrna in the Great Central Valley USA), Marabout, Inchàrio, and Zidi.


BUT Ca also grows the non wasp ones commercially



In the United States, the major centers for commercial production of cultivated figs are California and Texas. The more popular Californian varieties are packed fresh or dried. Most Texas figs are canned.

Figs were brought to California by the Spanish missionary fathers who first planted them at the San Diego Mission in 1759. Fig trees were then planted at each succeeding mission, going North through California. The Mission fig, Californias leading black fig, takes its name from this history.

www.grownincalifornia.com...

SO you can easily buy dried Missions like here for $6.99 a lb no wasps included!



Dried mission figs are a bit smaller and sweeter than the Calimyrna variety. Also known as Black mission figs, they have a deep purple skin that appears black when dried, and a slight pinkish hue on the inside. The name “mission figs” comes from the Franciscan missionaries who planted them throughout California in the late 18th century. Mission figs are an excellent source of fiber, potassium, and other minerals.

nuts.com...



Personally I see it as no big deal but people with the wasp pollinated varieties say they do in fact see wasps all over the tree and like me many never in my case 20 years of having fig trees at home saw any wasp anywhere. I believe we had ‘Mission’ figs'. SO you can make your own homemade waspless fig cookies!

edit on 14-4-2015 by Char-Lee because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 06:39 PM
link   

originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: BeefNoMeat
What would have given you that impression?

I've never seen a fig tree, but from several accounts here in this thread even those with fig trees have failed to acquire this knowledge. It's definitely news to me and I have a pretty good handle on common knowledge. I love this kind of tidbit and I am disappointed I failed to know.


I'm pretty sure I knew as a yoot. Then again, I was a farm kid, deep into FFA and 4H, and we had a fig patch which magically transformed into many pints of preserves yearly. The secret trick to fig preserves is slicing up lemons into it in paper thin sections, sort of like a marmalade.

If you didn't know about figs, wait until you discover what Jello is.


Oh no, you've piqued my interest. Please do tell me what Bill Cosby failed to disclose



new topics

top topics



 
45
<< 2  3  4    6  7  8 >>

log in

join