It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

What NASA plans to do if an astronaut dies in space

page: 3
11
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 08:16 PM
link   

originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: greencmp

originally posted by: Ultralight
a reply to: greencmp

Excellent point! Does that mean no weight loss/gain either on the long journey?? Not that one would wake up and float to the fridge for that last piece of chocolate cake...


As long as the mass of the whole vehicle remains the same and any fuel expenditures are completely and accurately accounted for.

You could pick up or drop things (not sure what to pick up on the way, maybe the Chinese Mars lander
) en route but, you would have to recalculate the entire journey.


Do0es it really matter? I don't think the Apollo missions followed such a strict "must be a specific weight" protocol.

The Apollo astronauts left waste bags full of their urine, feces, and vomit on the Moon. They also left many other things: their life-support backpacks, boot overshoes, hammers, shovels, cameras, unused film, and more.

Sure -- they also brought rocks back with them, but I don't think they needed to strike some perfect balance between what they left and what they brought back (i.e., they didn't need to hit an exact and specific mass). Granted, they had a limit, but that's not the same thing.



Oh yes, when we returned from the moon we were very careful to account for the exact weight of the vehicle including the lunar samples.

Introduce another 150,000,000 miles to that calculation and you can see how problematic an incorrect variable could be.




posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 02:11 PM
link   

originally posted by: greencmp

originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: greencmp

originally posted by: Ultralight
a reply to: greencmp

Excellent point! Does that mean no weight loss/gain either on the long journey?? Not that one would wake up and float to the fridge for that last piece of chocolate cake...


As long as the mass of the whole vehicle remains the same and any fuel expenditures are completely and accurately accounted for.

You could pick up or drop things (not sure what to pick up on the way, maybe the Chinese Mars lander
) en route but, you would have to recalculate the entire journey.


Do0es it really matter? I don't think the Apollo missions followed such a strict "must be a specific weight" protocol.

The Apollo astronauts left waste bags full of their urine, feces, and vomit on the Moon. They also left many other things: their life-support backpacks, boot overshoes, hammers, shovels, cameras, unused film, and more.

Sure -- they also brought rocks back with them, but I don't think they needed to strike some perfect balance between what they left and what they brought back (i.e., they didn't need to hit an exact and specific mass). Granted, they had a limit, but that's not the same thing.



Oh yes, when we returned from the moon we were very careful to account for the exact weight of the vehicle including the lunar samples.

Introduce another 150,000,000 miles to that calculation and you can see how problematic an incorrect variable could be.


Like I said, I understand that they had a weight limit that they did not want to exceed, but I never heard that they had such and exact and specific mass that they needed to achieve -- i.e., a mass so precise that they could not be any heavier NOR could they be any lighter.

I didn't think they went as far as to weigh the amount of feces and urine and vomit left behind in waste bags on the Moon so they could make up that weight by replacing it with other things of equal mass.



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 09:06 PM
link   

originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: greencmp

originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: greencmp

originally posted by: Ultralight
a reply to: greencmp

Excellent point! Does that mean no weight loss/gain either on the long journey?? Not that one would wake up and float to the fridge for that last piece of chocolate cake...


As long as the mass of the whole vehicle remains the same and any fuel expenditures are completely and accurately accounted for.

You could pick up or drop things (not sure what to pick up on the way, maybe the Chinese Mars lander
) en route but, you would have to recalculate the entire journey.


Do0es it really matter? I don't think the Apollo missions followed such a strict "must be a specific weight" protocol.

The Apollo astronauts left waste bags full of their urine, feces, and vomit on the Moon. They also left many other things: their life-support backpacks, boot overshoes, hammers, shovels, cameras, unused film, and more.

Sure -- they also brought rocks back with them, but I don't think they needed to strike some perfect balance between what they left and what they brought back (i.e., they didn't need to hit an exact and specific mass). Granted, they had a limit, but that's not the same thing.



Oh yes, when we returned from the moon we were very careful to account for the exact weight of the vehicle including the lunar samples.

Introduce another 150,000,000 miles to that calculation and you can see how problematic an incorrect variable could be.


Like I said, I understand that they had a weight limit that they did not want to exceed, but I never heard that they had such and exact and specific mass that they needed to achieve -- i.e., a mass so precise that they could not be any heavier NOR could they be any lighter.

I didn't think they went as far as to weigh the amount of feces and urine and vomit left behind in waste bags on the Moon so they could make up that weight by replacing it with other things of equal mass.



As it happens, that is a completely viable solution if you have no means to compute a new launch sequence.

If you do have the data and capability to recompute, you simply have to adjust your variables to compensate.



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 10:01 PM
link   
You cannot keep a body on a ship on a mission that cannot immediately return to port. It is dangerous for everyone else, and is in the tune to what the Navy would do, and that is burial at sea, and in this case burial in space. In low Earth orbit, the decision to keep a body on board would most likely be made, as to not allow it to re-enter the atmosphere, which may not completely destroy it, and the mission would be scrubbed.



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 10:02 PM
link   
ArcheAge is an MMORPG developed by Korean developer Jake Song (former developer of Lineage) and his development company, XL Games. The game was released in Korea on January 15, 2013, Europe and North America on September 16, 2014, and has Archeage Gold also had a closed beta in China. ArcheAge is described as a "sandpark" MMORPG, which the developers say is a hybrid of the open content style of a "sandbox" game and the more structured play experience of a "themepark" game.



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 10:15 PM
link   
Are air locks and 'torpedo' tubes standard fit to Space Ships?

I suppose the answer would be in the type of Vehicle. If you were flying say a Space Shuttle size to Mars which would recover back to Earth, then ou could have some form of Airtight 'Grave' within the ship. If it were a ship like those that went to the moon where the re-entry vehicle is just a small part of the plan then you couldnt really sit dead astronauts in the vacant seats so either leave them in the cicrcling vehicle until it re-enters and they get a creamation or they float around space in nothing more that a space mausoleum.

I bet some Russian Cosmonauts have perished in Mer but were never reported..



posted on Apr, 13 2015 @ 11:44 AM
link   

originally posted by: Forensick
Are air locks and 'torpedo' tubes standard fit to Space Ships?

I suppose the answer would be in the type of Vehicle. If you were flying say a Space Shuttle size to Mars which would recover back to Earth, then ou could have some form of Airtight 'Grave' within the ship. If it were a ship like those that went to the moon where the re-entry vehicle is just a small part of the plan then you couldnt really sit dead astronauts in the vacant seats so either leave them in the cicrcling vehicle until it re-enters and they get a creamation or they float around space in nothing more that a space mausoleum.

I bet some Russian Cosmonauts have perished in Mer but were never reported..


Not yet (torpedo tubes) and usually not (for airlocks.) but for airlocks that is a result of size and function of what we put in space. airlocks would be handy on larger ships or on colony modules. but torpedo tubes- the need has not arisen yet. assuming the move into space utilization remains peaceful (which could be rather naive) weapons in space are frowned upon.

Even so- "torpedo tubes" for a larger ship might come in handy. If you had standardized form factors for space probes; torpedo tubes would be a good way to launch them and would allow technicians up to the last seconds before launch access to them in a shirt sleeve environment.

At some point when we have really big ships that can realistically cruise the whole solar system and beyond in a routine fashion torpedo tubes could be dual use in the event that risk of conflict is more realistic.
edit on 13-4-2015 by stormbringer1701 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 02:10 PM
link   
you know gotta do hat you gotta do! haha



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 02:12 PM
link   
a reply to: Ultralight

theys tons of space garbage from out missions and diffrent things which i guess litter is diffrent in space it just sorta floats aroud but ya know haha



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 02:28 PM
link   
wouldnt the home office take over



new topics

top topics



 
11
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join