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Largest Mass Extinction Ever Caused By Ocean Acidification

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posted on Apr, 10 2015 @ 03:03 PM
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originally posted by: mbkennel

originally posted by: Chrisfishenstein

originally posted by: yorkshirelad

originally posted by: Chrisfishenstein
a reply to: soficrow

I mean something realistic! We aren't going to sue the governments....

What actions can be taken by man to stop this from getting worse? Or is there anything that can even be done at this point? Also, one more thing....If we take actions now, is there any guarantee this problem goes away just by taking action or it is too bad to stop at this point?

Sorry to not have an opinion, I just learned of this from you here....So I am not really sure what can be done here

Stop burning fossil fuels.


Well apparently I understand that part, but if we stop completely right now is there any evidence to support that this will actually work? Will this put "things back to normal"? Or are we too far gone?


Too far gone to prevent more climate change, yes. Too far gone to prevent substantially more extreme climate change, no.

Eventually, over hundreds to thousands of years the extra carbon will be eaten by acquatic microbes and some of them will die and fall to the sea bottom and NOT be decayed aerobically (which would release their carbon again). Basically, start to re-make coal and oil.

Fossil fuels today are found in the remnants of long-time oceans and were formed mostly from algae.


Well, if you took that to TPTB about hundreds of thousands of years from now we may be able to cure our oceans, I think that wouldn't get very far! I guess unless you find a better way for people living in the style of life they are accustomed to, then we may as well wave goodbye to everything as we all exit this Earth...




posted on Apr, 10 2015 @ 03:36 PM
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No mention of Corexits effect on oceans?



posted on Apr, 10 2015 @ 05:42 PM
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originally posted by: Greven

originally posted by: SpongeBeard
a reply to: soficrow

I'm a little confused by the claim of carbon raising acidity. I've got a dozen fishtanks, half of which have carbon dioxide bubblers in them, and the PH level of the water does not change AT ALL.

H2O = water.
CO2 = carbon dioxide.
H2CO3 = carbonic acid.

That part is pretty simple, really. However, then you get into ions, and you end up with carbonate and bicarbonate, too - along with free hydrogen ions.

If you are using CO2 bubblers I would imagine that it's because you are growing aquatic plants in your aquariums. Those consume CO2 to survive, so they will offset the introduction of CO2. The aquariums might be quite full of plants (in volume comparison), but compare that to the hundreds or thousands of feet deep oceans all over the world.

The pH of the ocean is estimated to have changed by over -0.1 units overall since the industrial revolution, and is expected change between -0.3 to -0.5 eventually. If you're not using a very accurate pH monitor that is particularly accurate, you'd probably miss it.


Thanks, I appreciate the response. That clears things up considerably.



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 07:54 AM
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a reply to: Chrisfishenstein


Your answer to solving this problem and keeping it from happening is to sue the government?


Not my answer. Am reporting on what's happening elsewhere in the world. And plaintiffs' goal is NOT to get cash, but to force action.



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 08:10 AM
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a reply to: Bilk22


.... if there's another massive volcanic eruption such as Yosemite or other large caldera, then we can expect the same to happen. How do we stop that?


Fact is, our planet's climate and geophysical stability can be -and are- affected by our sun, galaxy, and the rest of the universe, not just human activity. For example:

Ancient Interstellar Collision: May Help Explain Climate Change

So we can get all fatalistic, point to ancient interstellar collisions and super volcanoes, and stick our heads up our butts - OR - we can do what we can not to make things any worse. A no-brainer, imho.




But that's just me.






edit on 11/4/15 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 08:17 AM
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Who cares about this when millions of tons of polluted radioactive water from Fukushima are still pouring into the Pacific?

We can't stop volcanos from going off!



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 08:30 AM
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Clearly the research and others are suggesting Volcanic activity, known to increase during ice ages, as a major cause of global warming, increased atmospheric Co2 and ocean acidification. There isn't much humanity can do about that, nature is nature and is greater than humanity. These things are also cyclical and there isn't any stopping the cycles of nature.

www.abovetopsecret.com...
Report: Undersea volcanic activity affected by cyclical ice ages; causes global warming

www.livescience.com...


The climate-driven rise and fall of sea level during the past million years matches up with valleys and ridges on the seafloor, suggesting ice ages influence underwater volcanic eruptions, two new studies reveal. And because volcanic chains suture some 37,000 miles (59,500 kilometers) of ocean floor, the eruptions could pump out enough carbon dioxide gas to shift planetary temperatures, the study authors suggest.

"Surprisingly, the deep seafloor matters in the long-term climate cycle," said Maya Tolstoy, lead author of one of the studies and a marine geophysicist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in Palisades, New York.

Climate converters

Both studies suggest that there could be a complex feedback loop among ice ages, sea level changes and these bursts of volcanic activity. For instance, if volcanoes pick up their pace during an ice age, then carbon dioxide gas could warm the Earth and shrink the ice sheets. (Underwater volcanoes pump carbon dioxide into the ocean, just as their terrestrial cousins add climate-altering gases to the atmosphere.) However, no one knows how much gas would escape into the atmosphere from the oceans.




Ice ages are driven by regular variations in Earth's orbit. These changes in tilt, eccentricity and orbit create climate cycles that last 23,000 years; 41,000 years; and 100,000 years, respectively (at least for the previous million years). Sea level may rise and fall by some 330 feet (about 100 meters) during these climate swings.

"In a broad sense, this reinforces the idea that the climate system and the solid Earth are connected and, in fact, may be thought of as a single system," Katz said. "Not only do ice ages affect volcanism, but volcanism has a feedback effect on climate itself. We haven't proved that yet, but it's a tantalizing possibility."

"Both of these data sets have found a signal which is consistent with climate forcing of variations at midocean ridges," said Paul Asimow, a geology professor at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena who was not involved in either study. "Now, apart from showing the effect is there, the other part that needs to be teased out is its consequences."

edit on 11-4-2015 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 08:30 AM
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a reply to: Signals

There's a HUGE list of ways we're destroying life on our planet - including radiation from Fukushima, ocean acidification and many, many more. Fixing one thing while ignoring the others won't work. ...It's all too big for one person to think about, but a bunch of Dutch kids are trying:

What Can We Do?

...Personally, I'd go after the corporations too.



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 08:37 AM
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originally posted by: theabsolutetruth
Clearly the research and others are suggesting Volcanic activity, known to increase during ice ages, as a major cause of global warming, increased atmospheric Co2 and ocean acidification. There isn't much humanity can do about that, nature is nature and is greater than humanity. These things are also cyclical and there isn't any stopping the cycles of nature.


Our planet does not exist in a vacuum. Fact is, our planet's geophysical stability and climate can be -and are- affected by events in our sun, galaxy and the rest of the universe, plus human activity. For example:

Ancient Interstellar Collision: May Help Explain Climate Change

For all we know, the High-Energy Jet Emanating from the Milky Way’s Black Hole creates ULF's that trigger earthquake and volcanic activity. It's possible.

So we can get all fatalistic, point to ancient interstellar collisions, black holes and super volcanoes, and stick our heads up our butts - OR - we can do what we can not to make things any worse. A no-brainer, imho.


Seriously.



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 09:42 AM
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a reply to: soficrow

If you actually read the comments I posted you would realise that I am more than aware of the interaction between the planet and the solar system /galaxy /Universe and it's travels.

Furthermore, the forces of nature and the fact the Earth is part of greater systems is something humanity cannot influence. The human impact on the planet is negligible compared to the greater forces and events.



Ice ages are driven by regular variations in Earth's orbit. These changes in tilt, eccentricity and orbit create climate cycles that last 23,000 years; 41,000 years; and 100,000 years, respectively (at least for the previous million years). Sea level may rise and fall by some 330 feet (about 100 meters) during these climate swings.



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 05:05 PM
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a reply to: theabsolutetruth

Sorry I wasn't more clear. I was responding to this specific comment that you made: “Clearly the research and others are suggesting Volcanic activity, known to increase during ice ages, as a major cause of global warming, increased atmospheric Co2 and ocean acidification. There isn't much humanity can do about that, nature is nature and is greater than humanity. These things are also cyclical and there isn't any stopping the cycles of nature.”

I agree there's no stopping solar, galactic and universal cycles - I also know we need to do what we can not to make things any worse. I doubt "The human impact on the planet is negligible compared to" every non-planetary event. True, the universe is a great big place and yes, the earth can get bounced around like a rubber ball, which means yes, our geophysical balance is pretty precarious in the larger scheme of things. But sorry, doesn't matter if a hurricane might blow the house down - you still have to do the dishes, clean your room and take out the trash. If the house makes it, that basic hygiene will protect your health for a good long time. Trust me.

...But back to human impacts. Think of underground oil, gas and water as planetary shock absorbers that help our earth survive cyclic impacts and also, as insulators that protect the earth's surface from the core's heat. ...Now picture the earth with no shock absorbers or insulation. ...A real heated concussion!



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 06:20 PM
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a reply to: soficrow

The thread is about the influence of nature, my comment is in response to that, nothing was mentioned about human survival skills.

Also the amount of natural resources of water, oil and gas removed by humanity isn't going to impact any of their potential insulation effects.



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 09:18 PM
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During the Permian–Triassic extinction event CO2 levels went to over 3000 ppm.

But the O2 levels went to under 10%.
Plus there was toxic levels of hydrogen sulfide that would destroy the ozone layer.
And very high levels of methane that is a lot worse green house gas.

With all this nothing can be linked in any way to today.



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 11:34 PM
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a reply to: [post=19222520]chiefsmom[/post

You hit that one on the head. It is earth's way of surviving. She's been here awhile. Are we going to see her cleansing in our life time? Probably not but there sure are signs definitely showing up. Yes we as a human race play a role on our environment but not even close to how much mother earth puts on herself. We are lucky to be where we are at in time. Enjoy it.


lightmeup04



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 11:53 PM
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originally posted by: Kali74
a reply to: Chrisfishenstein

Cut carbon emissions.


Nawww, cut BS emissions from international banksters, politicians and paid off scientists. It's always smarter to cure the disease rather than put a band-aid on the symptoms.

Cheers - Dave



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 12:30 AM
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I would expect sulfur dioxide or any sulfur compound to acidify water more efficiently than carbon dioxide.



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 01:30 PM
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a reply to: lightmeup04
[quote]
We are lucky to be where we are at in time. Enjoy it.


YES!

S&







edit on 12/4/15 by soficrow because: (no reason given)




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