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Are you an anti-vaxxer when it comes to your dog?

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posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 04:28 PM
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I believe that vaccines are effective in humans, but when it comes to my dog I turn into an anti vaxxer. Aside from the rabies shot I feel uneasy having my dog vaccinated with any other drug.




posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 04:32 PM
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a reply to: muse7

why ?



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 04:34 PM
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Nah, the depopulation of pets isn't on their current agenda.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 04:34 PM
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originally posted by: ignorant_ape
a reply to: muse7

why ?


Side effects and I don't feel as if the industry is regulated enough



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 04:35 PM
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Nah, he had the regular rounds as a pup.

He gets the Rabies booster now.

He's not really at risk for much!

13 years old and holding...



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 04:35 PM
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originally posted by: CallYourBluff
Nah, the depopulation of pets isn't on their current agenda.


It might not be in their agenda however maximum profits are



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 04:36 PM
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originally posted by: muse7

originally posted by: ignorant_ape
a reply to: muse7

why ?


Side effects and I don't feel as if the industry is regulated enough


Yet you support humans being forced to accept the same kind of shots you are concerned your pets are being forced to get?

WOW!!!!



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 04:47 PM
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originally posted by: muse7

originally posted by: CallYourBluff
Nah, the depopulation of pets isn't on their current agenda.


It might not be in their agenda however maximum profits are

Exactly, it wouldn't make any sense to kill their customers.Besides, people like animals better than each other so I'm sure the vaccines are safe.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 05:02 PM
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a reply to: muse7

You clearly do not know anyone who works in the industry ...



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 05:49 PM
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a reply to: muse7

Since I just lost one of my GSDs last week because of a reaction to a "simple antibiotic", I have been looking into homeopathic animal health and the dangers of vaccines and I have decided to get a titer test for my remaining dogs' distemper vaccines. It basically tests to see if the dogs have continuing immunity to the disease. I'm going to get away from conventional medicine for the dogs as much as reasonable in the future.

Western medicine is 100% wonderful for SOME issues, but for others, resorting to drugs is possibly one of the most dangerous treatments. My husband and I use herbal medicines all the time, and have for YEARS! I haven't had a flu shot for over 15 years. I only wish I had done the same for my dog. She might still be with us...



Not surprisingly, most of the problems involve the immune system. After all, the immune system is what vaccines are designed to stimulate. But they do so in a very unnatural way that can overwhelm and confuse the immune system. The body may overreact to normally harmless substances (allergies, especially flea allergies and other skin problems), or even produce antibodies to itself (auto-immune diseases).

At the same time, the body may be sluggish in responding to those things that it should reject, such as common viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. This can result in increased susceptibility to acute infections (such as parvovirus), chronic or recurring infections (such as ear infections in dogs, bladder infections or feline leukemia in cats), or other chronic problems such as arthritis, kidney disease, or even cancer.

In summary, there is a great deal of evidence implicating vaccination as the cause of many serious chronic health problems. For this reason, I do not recommend vaccination for dogs or cats.


Source
edit on 4/9/2015 by Benevolent Heretic because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 06:02 PM
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a reply to: muse7

Why give your dog the rabies vaccine?
It is a vaccine after all.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: butcherguy

In most places, rabies vax is required by law for registration.



Should I Titer Test for Rabies?

The rabies titer test will give you an indication of your dog’s immunity if he or she is at particular risk for contracting rabies. It may also be required prior to international travel. Test results will NOT be accepted by Animal Control and most others as a substitute for vaccination of healthy dogs as required by law.


Titer Testing



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 06:24 PM
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a reply to: Benevolent Heretic

There are plenty of dogs out there that are not registered, licensed or vaccinated... not that I recommend it in any way.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 06:33 PM
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I know an anti-vax family who lost a beautiful puppy to canine distemper.

Animal pharma is heavily regulated and heavily inspected. I don't think there is a month goes by that there isn't some inspection team or other on campus inspecting. Some of them are scheduled and some are unannounced.

And the basic processes used to make a vaccine in humans is also used to make them for animals. It's the same principle.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 08:07 PM
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I suggest researching this.. The vet community is actually home to quite a few conspiracies.

Everything from food companies running schools to vaccines being effective for FAR longer than commonly accepted.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 08:34 PM
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a reply to: Serdgiam

It's a side effect of regulation and a company that takes pride in their product. Do you want a company that is so skin flint and so doesn't care about the welfare of animals that they would sell a product that is bare minimum effectiveness through the advertised shelf-life window? About 75% of any company's business is repeat customers. No serious company is going to take that kind of chance and stay in business for long.

So yes, product does last longer then advertised, but all the expiration date on the bottle means is that within two weeks of the injection you can expect the animal to produce an immune response that will protect them against a CDC-required or WHO-required challenge. That is, of course, presuming that the animal in question has a healthy/normal immune system. In reality, a company that takes pride in its product and reputation will make sure the shelf-life of its product goes beyond that label date.

Once the immune response is provoked, every animal is an individual. Immune systems will vary. Some will have protection last longer and others will lose it right away. So you are wise to request a titer test before vaccinations as your pet may not need them that year. My husband only recently lost his rabies titer, and he hadn't had a shot for it in a little over a decade. Obviously, YMMV when it comes to this sort of thing.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 09:06 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

I wasn't talking about shelf life. And yes, each body reacts differently as common sense would dictate.

After having worked in the field in many capacities, I saw a whole lot going on behind the curtain that would have never succeeded in most other industries. Very little of it gets any attention, for a variety of reasons (many of which are specific to the field).

My suggestion was to research it all.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 09:36 PM
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a reply to: Serdgiam

My husband works in animal pharma and makes vaccines. His field is product stability. He sees all the quality control testing. I'm not sure how much more testing I could do than to live with it for nearly 20 years of which more than 10 has been his career.

Additionally, we have college friends who are professional veterinarians in differing capacities.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 09:57 PM
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Our cats get the required rabies vaccine and one other. At the moment the other one is escaping my memory but it was recommended by the vet---something to do with feline leukemia perhaps?
Our cats had never had any vaccine except rabies until a few years ago. When we took them in for their yearly check-up there were five vaccinations to be given listed on the sheet. Since both cats were rescues of unknown origin, I questioned the tech about these new shots. She replied that it was their new protocol for all the animals they treat. When the vet came in I questioned him. He explained that these vaccines were available if we wanted them, that the professional organizations had begun promoting them quite heavily. He went on to say that of the four optional ones, he would recommend only one since our cats rarely come into contact with unknown cats.
He has since retired but we've kept with his recommendations despite being "scolded" for not following what they consider proper protocol.
Recently I was able to introduce the new vet to ionic silver solution. She was highly skeptical when the conversations began but two weeks later when she clearly saw the efficacy, she actually did a bit of research on it and is now recommending it. Just like people docs, they only know what they are taught and they are taught to use pharmaceuticals.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 10:02 PM
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a reply to: diggindirt

Our cats are indoor cats too, and they get the rabies shot. We have one who is an escape artist, so he gets more than the other two. We get him titer tested though before some of the boosters.

If we had a dog or if we had the outdoor kennel we would like to build for our cats, we might have to start giving the other two more shots also.

Most vets are sensible when you talk with them.



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