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Do pilots believe in UFOs? Many of them do and here is my close encounter story

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posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 08:06 AM
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www.nydailynews.com...


It was April 10, 1989 and early in my career. I was still a first officer at a regional airline. It was about 8 p.m. and we had just taken off from Kansas City International Airport bound for Waterloo, Iowa. It was a beautiful evening, with a full moon, clear skies and crisp early spring temperatures. The weather forecast for Waterloo was as nice, with clear skies and unlimited visibility.

After a short taxi and take-off, Air Traffic Control (ATC) cleared us to our cruise altitude of 15,000 feet. We established a Northeasterly heading, pointed strait at Waterloo, about 200 miles ahead. There were thin wispy clouds all around us, illuminated by the light of the full moon that shone through the captain's-side window at our left. Despite the presence of these clearly visible wispy clouds everywhere, we weren't flying through any of them. There was also a white disc dimly but clearly visible through those clouds just off to our right.



We flew on and I commented to Bruce, the captain, about this dimly visible disc. He said that he'd been watching the same thing since we had leveled off. It looked similar to the moon faintly visible though thin fog, except the two were visible at the same time on opposite sides of our cockpit. We looked down below for search lights, you know, the kind that's sometimes used for aerial light displays or advertising at a car dealer, but there was no beam of light coming from the ground, no search light from an airport either. The captain and I had cumulatively spent many years flying and were accustomed to seeing — day and night — all manner of airplane, blimp, hot air balloon, satellite and bird. But neither of us had any idea what this disc could be.



We spent 20 to 30 minutes at our cruise altitude, all the while staring at this white disc dimly visible through some clouds that we somehow never seemed to fly through. Within about 40 miles of Waterloo, ATC confirmed the weather, still clear skies and unrestricted visibility at our destination as we began to descend. We got busy with our flying duties and for a short while, maybe for a minute, both of us had looked away from the disc, but when I looked up at it again I saw something that has been burned into my memory.



I yelled to Bruce, "Holy s--t." He immediately looked over from what he was doing. Above the clouds, where the white disc had been, was a now giant red ball. It was big and bright and just sat there above the clouds. It wasn't intense enough to illuminate us with a red glow but it was still plenty bright. We sat there in stunned silence. We obviously didn't want to hit it but quickly saw that it was flying parallel to our course. We weren't on a collision course and we also weren't gaining on it. Time became a blur as we continued our descent, this giant, red ball holding its course.

We slowly lost altitude and at around 13,000 feet, the brightly glowing ball began a gradual descent, too. As it did, it slowly started disappearing behind those wispy clouds. In about 30 seconds, like a setting sun but not nearly as bright, it vanished behind the clouds. The instant it fully disappeared, hundreds of lights began flashing from within the clouds.



As I looked on in disbelief, the flashing lights were brighter than ever and I could see that the section of the cloud that the glowing red ball had descended behind was starting to stretch apart like a piece of "Silly Putty," two halves being pulled slowly apart with the middle getting thinner and thinner. This continued until the halves grew so thin that it tore apart and, pop! Everything was gone. The dimly lit disc, the flashing lights, the thin wispy clouds that we had with us for the last 40 minutes; all of it, gone. There wasn't a cloud in the sky. Only the full moon remained off to our left.

Bruce and I just looked at each other. "Oh my God, what the f--k was that", was all I could muster. My colleague just stared out the windscreen, mesmerized. We discussed whether we should report what we had just witnessed. After a few minutes, I picked up the radio mic and asked the Kansas City Center controller if they had anything on radar. "Nope, nothing but you," came the response. "No, not right now but a couple minutes ago, at our one to two o'clock," I replied. "No," he repeated, "It's a slow night. I've got the entire sector between Kansas City and Waterloo and you're all that's been in it for the last hour." Bruce and I again just looked at each other, completely dumbfounded. "So for the last say 40 minutes or so you've had no traffic at all, not at our one or two o'clock?" I asked. "No sir, not at your one or two o'clock, not anywhere, you're all there is," he assured us.


There is a bit more, but this is the story. Very interesting to hear this account. I'd like to know if any ATS pilots have any similar stories?




posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 08:15 AM
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a reply to: network dude

Personally no.. As a crew chief I've talked with pilots that saw things...

Typically it goes unreported because you either get a visit from an alphabet agency or your bosses start wondering if you need a psych evaluation.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 08:20 AM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

What airframe did/do you work with? I was com-nav on C-130's, but when my work was slow, I acted as a crew chief to pass the time. (doing BPO's, fueling, tire changes and the like)



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 08:25 AM
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a reply to: network dude

B-52, B-1, kc135, awacs FE.

Had a buddy told to forget a radar reading in south America by a guy in a suit, during counter drug ops. Every day for a week they scoped someone taking off at Cessna speeds then speed an altitude would increase at an amazing rate... Like Sr 71 in a rapid climb type of rate before losing it.

Reported it each day till some chuckle head showed up and said you never saw it, stop reporting it.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 08:32 AM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

So my guess is you were either real hot, or real cold, judging by the bases you could have been at.
(B-52)

Interesting story. Was it operating out of a military base? (the radar anomaly)



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 08:38 AM
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We discussed whether we should report what we had just witnessed. After a few minutes, I picked up the radio mic and asked the Kansas City Center controller if they had anything on radar. "Nope, nothing but you," came the response.

The question I got to raise is why they waited till after it was gone to ask traffic control for confirmation. Seeing as how it paralleled their course for so long and all…

Ho hum, theres unknown traffic out there, lets ignore it until it leaves. How would they even know it wasn't dangerous and or what it even was, let alone report it or seek to evade it with permission, whatever.

I'm not even a pilot and that smacks of convenience for the stories sake.


“Do you have any traffic in front of us?”
“JAL1628 heavy, roger,” Henley now understood. Standard procedures are to identify and track an airspace violator until he lands, and then the FAA’s Flight Standards people will give him a ticket and a stern talking-to.

In trail , I say again…



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 09:06 AM
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Me old man was a pilot for 30 years, no UFO stories.

Literally saw nothing out of the ordinary.

Well, when I say 'Saw nothing out of the ordinary..." I mean specifically UFOs.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 09:07 AM
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I know a man that worked for the US government for 30 years, working on the high powered radar sets that we used for tracking Soviet missile tests during the Cold War.
He said that there were multiple times that he had tracked contacts that flew at phenomenal speeds that weren't even possible for missiles. I inquired if it was possible that he was seeing meteors. He said these things changed course, maneuvered.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 09:22 AM
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Me old man was a pilot for 30 years, no UFO stories.
a reply to: and14263

Imagine that? I couldn't fly a kite and I saw a UFO in broad daylight.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 09:24 AM
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a reply to: network dude

I went straight up the middle of the USA, Barksdale, tinker, ellsworth, back to tinker.

He said as far as the Intel he got before each flight there were no military bases in the area only grass strips used by fairly light planes.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 09:28 AM
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I think a better question might be do pilots believe in none terrestrial vehicles operating in our skies , UFO is such a generic term I doubt there's any pilot who hand on heart could say there aren't things in the sky they couldn't identify at one time or another.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 09:43 AM
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a reply to: gortex

At the end of the article, this one pilot claims :


That was more than 25 years ago. Today I'm older, wiser and at the end of my career. In my last few years of flying the subject of UFOs occasionally came up in the cockpit. If it was brought up at all, it was usually by a younger, newer first officer who'd say something with much trepidation. More than a few pilots have shared their UFO stories with me, too. I'm not going too far out on a ledge to say that virtually all pilots believe in UFOs. Little green men, "close encounters", alien kidnappings,... not so much, but with billions of stars and trillions of planets out there, "ya gotta believe", and almost all of us do.


for what it's worth.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 09:47 AM
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originally posted by: Irishhaf
a reply to: network dude

I went straight up the middle of the USA, Barksdale, tinker, ellsworth, back to tinker.

He said as far as the Intel he got before each flight there were no military bases in the area only grass strips used by fairly light planes.


thanks for the information. I'd guess drone, but then how early were we doing the UAV thing?



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 09:52 AM
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originally posted by: network dude

originally posted by: Irishhaf
a reply to: network dude

I went straight up the middle of the USA, Barksdale, tinker, ellsworth, back to tinker.

He said as far as the Intel he got before each flight there were no military bases in the area only grass strips used by fairly light planes.


thanks for the information. I'd guess drone, but then how early were we doing the UAV thing?

Although the rate of climb mentioned seems out of the ordinary for drones, barring some black project existing that has unannounced specs that would make it possible.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 10:03 AM
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I saw this story the other day. PIlots DO SEE UFO'S, quite a few have seen them, well have had the balls to say they have seen ufo's, because has been pointed out Airline pilots can put their job on the line if they do step forward and talk. I recall fondly the famous JAL Anchorage incident from 1980. The Pilots first had contact with smaller ufo's that buzzed them for some time. They were seen on radar as well. Then they came in contact with a huge mothership too. A short time later after the sighting, the Captains' pilot job then became more of a desk job.....sadly.

I also think of the famous O'Hare sighting from 2006 I think it was? This was seen by many many people from airlines at the airport. I admire the courage it takes from Pilots' to come forward with their sightings. Maybe someday soon the sighting stigma will be gone.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 10:03 AM
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The only thing that I saw which was weird was on the way from Cincinnati to Knoxville. We were cruising at 22k and my first officer point out a large light with smaller lights slowly revolving around it. We both after some conversation agreed not to say nothing to ATC or to our company for obvious reason. On starting our descent into Knoxville we were still watching the smaller lights. Center then pointed out crossing traffic at our 2 o'clock climbing through our altitude. I took this opportunity to ask center the aircraft types. His reply was four A-7s coming off a refueling exercise near Nashville.

I felt rather stupid since both of us were ex-army pilots. Watching night refueling activities from 50 miles away was certainly new to both of us.
edit on 9-4-2015 by buddah6 because: lobotomized through superior pain meds.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 10:11 AM
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a reply to: buddah6

It sounds like you made a wise choice. And averted some ridicule.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 10:14 AM
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a reply to: data5091

Yes, the JAL incident was one of my favorites as far as radar data to back up the story. It's pathetic that the stigma of "nutjob" is associated with UFO sightings. You don't even have to mention little green men to have everyone treat you like a loon out of conditioning. I wonder how long after there is no question of these sightings, the stigma will fade away?



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 10:15 AM
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originally posted by: butcherguy

originally posted by: network dude

originally posted by: Irishhaf
a reply to: network dude

I went straight up the middle of the USA, Barksdale, tinker, ellsworth, back to tinker.

He said as far as the Intel he got before each flight there were no military bases in the area only grass strips used by fairly light planes.


thanks for the information. I'd guess drone, but then how early were we doing the UAV thing?

Although the rate of climb mentioned seems out of the ordinary for drones, barring some black project existing that has unannounced specs that would make it possible.


knowing what "g" forces feel like, a UAV would be the only way these things could operate unless they had their own gravity. IMHO



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 10:28 AM
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originally posted by: network dude

originally posted by: butcherguy

originally posted by: network dude

originally posted by: Irishhaf
a reply to: network dude

I went straight up the middle of the USA, Barksdale, tinker, ellsworth, back to tinker.

He said as far as the Intel he got before each flight there were no military bases in the area only grass strips used by fairly light planes.


thanks for the information. I'd guess drone, but then how early were we doing the UAV thing?

Although the rate of climb mentioned seems out of the ordinary for drones, barring some black project existing that has unannounced specs that would make it possible.


knowing what "g" forces feel like, a UAV would be the only way these things could operate unless they had their own gravity. IMHO

Agreed.
Just saying that it sounds like the drones would be ones that we haven't known about officially.



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