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NASA: We’ll find alien life in 10 to 20 years

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posted on Apr, 10 2015 @ 05:13 AM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
Everybody has their opinion, even scientists, but I personally think we're a couple hundred years away from finding ET life, if there is any close enough to find. And I mean little microbes and stuff, not Vulcans.

But I can see where NASA might want to stir the pot a little to keep the funding going. Their batting record on finding non-Earth based life so far has been .000.


You're making the schoolboy / schoolgirl error of basing your timeline to ET discovery on a misnomer...and that is that we are the only ones looking for life.

The evidence, overwhelmingly supports the opposite premise IMO (well, not just mine of course)

It's not about our technological advancement meeting the challenge of discovering intelligent ET life, it's more about our growing the hell up, seeing and more importantly, admitting to the reality of the massive amount of available evidence, spanning all periods of history and not only as some may incorrectly assume, confined to our technological 20th century.

We have not been 'alone' on this planet for a very long time.

But people will believe what they will, despite common sense metaphorically smacking them in the face repeatedly.

What is needed is clarity and official confirmation. Of course, clarity and official confirmation is difficult when there is along standing, active and ongoing campaign of denial and discrediting going on for most of the last century.






edit on 10-4-2015 by MysterX because: typo




posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 01:24 PM
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For anyone who wants to know the full context of the statement that we're likely to find life beyond Earth within the next 10 to 30 years, the source of that statemen is near the end of this video of the Tuesday press conference from NASA (though you should probably watch the whole video if you still have problems with this statement):



edit on 11-4-2015 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 03:18 PM
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a reply to: DJW001

The Internet which was first used by Scientists with respect to Military defense issues.
edit on 11-4-2015 by Kashai because: Content edit



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 07:45 PM
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originally posted by: JadeStar
You guys ought to check out some of the stuff I post on the Space Exploration forum. I've covered a lot of the questions you brought up.

In short, the reason why scientists at NASA and elsewhere are confident we may find life within the next 20 years is because we've found among other things:

1) Life on Earth started fairly soon after the Earth cooled down. (implying it wasn't that hard to get going).

2) The ingredients which make up life, including water are abundant throughout our galaxy and universe beyond.

3) NASA's Kepler spacecraft and exoplanet research in general has found a number of planets which are not too hot and not too cold for life as we know it.

3a) The using data from NASA's Kepler mission as well as ground based observatories the frequency of planets similar to the Earth is as a conservative estimate around 22% for stars like our Sun. Other studies suggest the number may be quite higher with there being on average of two for just about every star. Either way, that's between 50 and 200 billion planets like the Earth in our Milky Way galaxy alone.

4) Several nearby exoplanets may have conditions similar to our Earth. Two new space telescopes, TESS (2017) and James Webb (2018) may tell us for sure.

5) With the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope and the construction of several 30 meter and larger size ground telescopes, for the first time in history we will have the ability to remotely detect the atmospheric signatures of life on planets around other stars. If life is common, then we'll be able detect it on a nearby exoplanet.



You have contributed to this thread and I do sincerely appreciate that.


Nonetheless, I need to point out that the link at the OP does bring up finding life in this solar system as well.

Any thoughts?
edit on 11-4-2015 by Kashai because: Content edit



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 10:26 PM
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originally posted by: DJW001
a reply to: Kashai


Actually it is true in relation to Classified technology and NASA does have access to that.

In relation to my experiences it make perfect sense and has in all probability always been that way, since the days of Roman Empire.


Repeating a statement does not make it true. Can you provide an example of "classified" or "secret" technology that was made public after twenty years?




Known as technology demonstrators, these pioneering stealth aircraft remained top secret for years after their final flights before being declassified. Categorized as black projects and operating from the secret Groom Lake test site in Nevada, popularly known as Area 51, the three groundbreaking designs below tested low observable technologies and proved that stealth aircraft could operate deep behind enemy lines with a high degree of survivability. Together, they helped return the element of surprise to air warfare.


Source


Any thoughts?



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 11:50 PM
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originally posted by: Kashai

originally posted by: JadeStar
You guys ought to check out some of the stuff I post on the Space Exploration forum. I've covered a lot of the questions you brought up.

In short, the reason why scientists at NASA and elsewhere are confident we may find life within the next 20 years is because we've found among other things:

1) Life on Earth started fairly soon after the Earth cooled down. (implying it wasn't that hard to get going).

2) The ingredients which make up life, including water are abundant throughout our galaxy and universe beyond.

3) NASA's Kepler spacecraft and exoplanet research in general has found a number of planets which are not too hot and not too cold for life as we know it.

3a) The using data from NASA's Kepler mission as well as ground based observatories the frequency of planets similar to the Earth is as a conservative estimate around 22% for stars like our Sun. Other studies suggest the number may be quite higher with there being on average of two for just about every star. Either way, that's between 50 and 200 billion planets like the Earth in our Milky Way galaxy alone.

4) Several nearby exoplanets may have conditions similar to our Earth. Two new space telescopes, TESS (2017) and James Webb (2018) may tell us for sure.

5) With the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope and the construction of several 30 meter and larger size ground telescopes, for the first time in history we will have the ability to remotely detect the atmospheric signatures of life on planets around other stars. If life is common, then we'll be able detect it on a nearby exoplanet.



You have contributed to this thread and I do sincerely appreciate that.


Nonetheless, I need to point out that the link at the OP does bring up finding life in this solar system as well.

Any thoughts?


Watch the youtube video Jadestar posted, its fascinating and answers all your questions.

They talk about all the new projects there currently involved in and all the new technologies there on the verge of developing that NASA scientists are confident will give indisputable evidence of life within our solar system, galaxy and beyond. They even mentioned they were sending a probe to explore Europa this year (I think), which is very exciting.



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 04:47 AM
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a reply to: Kashai


Any thoughts?


Can you provide an example of how this technology is being used in the private sector now? Otherwise, all you have done is provide an example of how the military can keep current technology secret.



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 06:01 AM
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a reply to: Kashai


The Internet which was first used by Scientists with respect to Military defense issues.


It did not take twenty years before the technology was revealed to the public. In fact, I recall using the DARPANET to search for library books at other college and university libraries in the early 1970s. Can you find an actual example of the military developing and using a technology twenty years in advance of what the private sector is capable of? Jet airplanes? The performance specs of military craft were kept secret, but the technology was immediately put to civilian use. Rockets and satellites? The American space program has always been done in the full glare of public scrutiny. The computer? Yes, much of the early technology was used for code breaking and kept as a war secret, but the basic principles of analogue and digital computing were well understood in academia. The "atomic bomb?" Predicted publicly by physicists decades before the Manhattan Project. Nuclear power plants? The nuclear power plants developed for nuclear submarines were used immediately for civilian power generation.

Secret technology twenty years in advance of what the public knows about is a myth. Please do not use it to justify other unsupported beliefs.



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 01:35 PM
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a reply to: DJW001

I do not know what your problem is and I will make clear to you again...


Based upon my experience Technology exist that is considered top secret and that generally speaking is roughly 10 to 20 years ahead of anything known commonly. If your personality disorder do not allow you to think that way that is not my
problem.

My advise is that you chill out and stop.



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 01:36 PM
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originally posted by: Subaeruginosa

originally posted by: Kashai

originally posted by: JadeStar
You guys ought to check out some of the stuff I post on the Space Exploration forum. I've covered a lot of the questions you brought up.

In short, the reason why scientists at NASA and elsewhere are confident we may find life within the next 20 years is because we've found among other things:

1) Life on Earth started fairly soon after the Earth cooled down. (implying it wasn't that hard to get going).

2) The ingredients which make up life, including water are abundant throughout our galaxy and universe beyond.

3) NASA's Kepler spacecraft and exoplanet research in general has found a number of planets which are not too hot and not too cold for life as we know it.

3a) The using data from NASA's Kepler mission as well as ground based observatories the frequency of planets similar to the Earth is as a conservative estimate around 22% for stars like our Sun. Other studies suggest the number may be quite higher with there being on average of two for just about every star. Either way, that's between 50 and 200 billion planets like the Earth in our Milky Way galaxy alone.

4) Several nearby exoplanets may have conditions similar to our Earth. Two new space telescopes, TESS (2017) and James Webb (2018) may tell us for sure.

5) With the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope and the construction of several 30 meter and larger size ground telescopes, for the first time in history we will have the ability to remotely detect the atmospheric signatures of life on planets around other stars. If life is common, then we'll be able detect it on a nearby exoplanet.



You have contributed to this thread and I do sincerely appreciate that.


Nonetheless, I need to point out that the link at the OP does bring up finding life in this solar system as well.

Any thoughts?


Watch the youtube video Jadestar posted, its fascinating and answers all your questions.

They talk about all the new projects there currently involved in and all the new technologies there on the verge of developing that NASA scientists are confident will give indisputable evidence of life within our solar system, galaxy and beyond. They even mentioned they were sending a probe to explore Europa this year (I think), which is very exciting.


Thanks man yeah I am going to take a look at it.



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 01:41 PM
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a reply to: Kashai

Life as in single celled organisms i imagine is a definite possibility but sentient life resembling our own seems rather a long shot considering our universe most lightly subscribes to the concept of "infinite diversity in infinite combinations".



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 01:49 PM
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a reply to: Kashai


Based upon my experience Technology exist that is considered top secret and that generally speaking is roughly 10 to 20 years ahead of anything known commonly.


What is your experience with technology that your are personally aware of things that are 20 years beyond what I know about?



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 02:20 PM
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originally posted by: Kashai

originally posted by: JadeStar
You guys ought to check out some of the stuff I post on the Space Exploration forum. I've covered a lot of the questions you brought up.

In short, the reason why scientists at NASA and elsewhere are confident we may find life within the next 20 years is because we've found among other things:

1) Life on Earth started fairly soon after the Earth cooled down. (implying it wasn't that hard to get going).

2) The ingredients which make up life, including water are abundant throughout our galaxy and universe beyond.

3) NASA's Kepler spacecraft and exoplanet research in general has found a number of planets which are not too hot and not too cold for life as we know it.

3a) The using data from NASA's Kepler mission as well as ground based observatories the frequency of planets similar to the Earth is as a conservative estimate around 22% for stars like our Sun. Other studies suggest the number may be quite higher with there being on average of two for just about every star. Either way, that's between 50 and 200 billion planets like the Earth in our Milky Way galaxy alone.

4) Several nearby exoplanets may have conditions similar to our Earth. Two new space telescopes, TESS (2017) and James Webb (2018) may tell us for sure.

5) With the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope and the construction of several 30 meter and larger size ground telescopes, for the first time in history we will have the ability to remotely detect the atmospheric signatures of life on planets around other stars. If life is common, then we'll be able detect it on a nearby exoplanet.



You have contributed to this thread and I do sincerely appreciate that.


Nonetheless, I need to point out that the link at the OP does bring up finding life in this solar system as well.

Any thoughts?


Yes.

There are several missions being planned and others under consideration which could possibly turn up life in our solar system.


Beyond the Mars exploration we're all familiar with, there is now going to be at least two missions to Jupiter's intriguing ocean moon, Europa. ESA's JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) and NASA's Europa Clipper. While neither of these will contain a lander they both will contain high resolution spectrometers which could detect biosignatures remotely in any outgassing or water plumes (both of which may have been detected by Hubble).


Near term, NASA's Juno spacecraft is already enroute to enter Jupiter's orbit in July of next year.

Out at Saturn there are proposals at NASA/JPL and ESA to send a boat or submarine to explore the methane seas on Saturn's moon Titan. Most notably was NASA's TItan Mare Explorer (TIME) mission which while not approved, could be in some form in the future.

There's a great and HIGHLY detailed story over on a great space news site called Centauri Dreams which explains why scientists are so optimistic we'll find life either in or outside of our solar system within the next 10-30 years.

I highly recommend those interested in the subject read it to get a complete rundown of all the telescopes, missions and their capabilities with regards to learning a LOT more about our corner of the galaxy.

Oh, and if you haven't yet, watch the video I embedded earlier.

By 2030 we will have a far more complete picture of our neighborhood, complete understandings of many places we already know about, discovery of new places we'd love to learn more about and even possibly, others which might be inhabited in some form or another.

Even with (relative to other spending) relatively modest budgets, we are in the midst of a golden era of astrophysics, astrobiology and space exploration.
edit on 12-4-2015 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2015 @ 02:54 AM
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a reply to: JadeStar




What is planned over the next twenty years is not fully clear yet, but it is likely to culminate in a huge multi-purpose space telescope that will pull all previous work together, and in concert with other space and ground telescopes, and hopefully multiple interplanetary missions, will discover signs of life, if not at present, certainly in the past.


Oh really now!?

Aren't you guys overdoing it a bit with the whole, we will find alien life hype train?



posted on Apr, 13 2015 @ 03:42 AM
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a reply to: moebius

Well lets face it, the more excited they can get the public about space exploration, then the more funds that will be allocated to NASA, rather than the regular military, which is a positive thing for all of mankind.

With the short attention spans and feeble minds that most people tend to have, plugging themselves in Hollywood movies about Aliens and constantly releasing statements to the MSM, is probably the most efficient way to keep people interested.

I don't know, I'm just bored really. Just sitting around growing old waiting for humankind to do something (anything) of some kind of significance. Its like we built the pyramids of Giza with rocks and copper chisels, then just gave up putting any real effort in after that! lol.



posted on Apr, 13 2015 @ 05:23 AM
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a reply to: JadeStar

Also, the folks at NASA are looking forward to the next generation of Very Large Telescopes to come online. With adaptive optics and extremely long baseline optical interferometry, they may be able to detect exomoons in a decade or two.



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