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North Charleston cop charged with murder after video surfaces of him shooting man in the back

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posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 08:08 PM
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(except in this parody video they remembered to use some blood).




posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 08:16 PM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

I am well aware of that.

What you are ignoring is the attempt at founding a country that was, indeed, a republic. A republic that granted rights and priveleges few citizens of other countries enjoyed.

If you have read what the founding father's wrote regarding what they desired to create, you would not be so negative about them, but would target more modern times for the problems we have today.

They desired and designed a govt that would not be driven by the church. They desired and designed a nation that would prevent a despot from taking control and would limit the powers of the legislature, executive and judicial branches. They desired and designed a govt that would uphold individual rights, both granting and protecting them.

I could go on and on, but I doubt it would sink in. I could also expound on how things have gone wrong beginning long ago...slippery slope applies in all aspects here, but it would take many pages to be somewhat inclusive.

Instead I will just let the ignorance propagate, since that seems to be how things work in this world. Enlightenment is hard... lazy people just claim it without actually doing the work. The result is obvious in all they write and say: willful and blind ignorance.

" But, Mousie, thou art no thy lane,
In proving foresight may be vain;
The best laid schemes o' Mice an' Men,
Gang aft agley,
An' lea'e us nought but grief an' pain,
For promis'd joy!

-- "To A Mouse" by Robert Burns



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 08:23 PM
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originally posted by: bbracken677
a reply to: bullcat


No, knucklehead. I was speaking of police in general. If you are a police officer, you are in the line of fire.

He was a policeman, therefore he took a job that placed him in the line of fire. Anyone who claims the job of being a policeman does not come with risks to life and limb is a moron.


While I do agree with you, in that being a police officer goes hand in hand with risking your safety, I have to disagree with the mentality behind it. From the (admittedly) little reading I've done, it seems a lot of US law enforcement are of the "Us or them" philosophy. What I mean by that is when responding to incidents or approaching the public they are expecting trouble, which naturally leads the entire interaction. If a person in authority treats you as hostile, you are immediately going to be on edge, which influences your reaction to them and their reaction to you. Escalation.

Obviously, there are good cops out there who became police officers not to punish the bad, but to protect the good. However, I have to say to them the same thing people have started saying to Muslims; if the bad ones aren't representative why aren't you doing more?


As I stated in an earlier post: It was a bad, bad shooting. There is no excuse for shooting someone in the back ... and then claiming self defense? Thats just laughable.


It was a terrible incident, made all the more disgusting by the fact the guy who was running away could have been caught with a jog. He wasn't exactly sprinting at 20mph. The officer could have quite easily caught up to him, restrained him (using appropriate force), and then dealt with him.
This was a tragic, tragic murder, and a stark reminder of how little the establishment values the lives of the scum they tread on.



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 08:28 PM
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a reply to: bbracken677

And yes, I totally agree with you there! The American ideal has been raped, desecrated and mocked by those who came later.

And US citizens are to blame! Harsh, maybe, but democracy is a right that must be continually fought for. But you're not alone in this neglect. The entire world has allowed it's leaders to be bought, and it's up to us to throw them out and get government back on track.

Sadly, we won't. We'd like to live in a world where we don't moan about our leaders, but that program we want to watch is on in an hour, and a new iPhone's coming out soon and I've got to much to do today. And it doesn't really affect me that much.



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 08:29 PM
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posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 08:32 PM
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This is the reason there should be a federal law to protect the public's right under the first amendment to film the cops.

Illinois
arstechnica.com...
Texas
www.abovetopsecret.com...
Washington State
www.abovetopsecret.com...
its also illegal in.
Maryland and Massachusetts.
www.abovetopsecret.com...

We need a petition on petitions.whitehouse.gov...



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 08:47 PM
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a reply to: JackofBlades

I totally get what you mean, however I can understand the mentality (us or them) to a great degree.

Have you ever been imersed in a situation, over a period of time where it altered your perception of life in general? I liken it to a form of brain washing...perhaps even perpetrated by yourself in order to assist your sanity to survive.

Consider that, in the larger cities, police see, day in and day out, the worst that humanity has to offer.

After years of this, does it not make sense that one's perception, ones expectations are reduced to the lowest common denominator as offered by the worst that humanity has to offer?

Don't get me wrong, I am not excusing what this thread is about... What I am saying is that I understand, to some degree, how police officers wind up with the frame of mind they do. I find that they tend to exhibit more patience with people than I could ever muster. I would be a horrible cop.... I do not tolerate absolute stupidity well.

What is the solution? I have no answer for that. I do know that people who are so stupid that they will resist armed officers share a responsibility when they are shot. That, to me, seems totally absent from the discourse around the shootings. The total focus is on cops getting away with murder, and that should be an emphasis, but there should also be some emphasis on the causes of the situation that resulted in the shootings.

It takes two to tango.... If Brown had acted like a decent citizen, he would still be alive. If this guy had not tried to run (and had done the right thing and supported his freaking kids) he would still be alive. Is the full blame to be placed on the victims? I dont believe that should be the case, but I also do not believe the officers in question are fully to blame to the exclusion of all else either.

There needs to be a discourse regarding why, apparently, a specific group of people choose to run, choose to resist arrest and/or choose violence rather than submitting to the law.

In every one of the most recent cases, the "victims" were breaking a law or laws and chose resistance, violence or flight rather than just doing the right thing. They placed themselves in a position that could only turn out badly for them even with the best of results.

The officer in South Carolina who unloaded his gun on a fleeing individual with arrest warrants out on him had zero cause, zero excuse and zero logic for his actions. No doubt about it... I am sure there are many other shootings and murders that have been swept under the rug by the police.

The discourse about that is happening.

So when do we start talking about the antisocial behaviour exhibited by the "victims"? The discourse on that has not yet begun.... It just isn't PC, ya know?



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 08:54 PM
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a reply to: ANNED

You have a right.

The police may attempt to deprive you of that right, but you have the right.

The Supreme Court has ruled that there is no reasonable expectation of privacy when you are in a public setting. Specifically, you may record people's conversations and film their actions. People do not have a reasonable expectation of privacy when in public.

If a police officer attempts to prevent you from recording actions taken in the public arena I, for one, would remind him of the Supreme Court decision and would also let him know that if any action is taken by him to prevent me from exercising my rights then there will be litigation of magnificent proportions. I would also tell the officer that another person is recording this conversation and the officers actions in attempting to deprive me of my rights.

The question is, are you willing to risk an unlawful arrest?



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 08:57 PM
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originally posted by: bbracken677
So when do we start talking about the antisocial behaviour exhibited by the "victims"? The discourse on that has not yet begun.... It just isn't PC, ya know?

Fantastic, on to mocking the dead.

What about John Crawford instead of Michael Brown? Was he also a "victim" as you write?



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 09:21 PM
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originally posted by: Greven

originally posted by: bbracken677
So when do we start talking about the antisocial behaviour exhibited by the "victims"? The discourse on that has not yet begun.... It just isn't PC, ya know?

Fantastic, on to mocking the dead.

What about John Crawford instead of Michael Brown? Was he also a "victim" as you write?


You mean the anti social behavior by people who are not PAID, TRAINED, and ARMED to protect and serve? Right?


You it's fair for us to expect less from those PAID to do it then those PAYING for police services (tax payers).


A crazy comparison! Police should be held to a higher standard, not lower. THEY ARE NOT ALLOWED TO RETALIATE! Period for anything. That's what court is for.



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 09:22 PM
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a reply to: alienjuggalo

Hope he fries



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 09:28 PM
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a reply to: pfishy

saw on the tv news today,, that cops' lawyer saw the video and dropped him like a hot potato....



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 09:29 PM
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originally posted by: bbracken677
a reply to: enlightenedservant

I am well aware of that.

What you are ignoring is the attempt at founding a country that was, indeed, a republic. A republic that granted rights and priveleges few citizens of other countries enjoyed.

If you have read what the founding father's wrote regarding what they desired to create, you would not be so negative about them, but would target more modern times for the problems we have today.

They desired and designed a govt that would not be driven by the church. They desired and designed a nation that would prevent a despot from taking control and would limit the powers of the legislature, executive and judicial branches. They desired and designed a govt that would uphold individual rights, both granting and protecting them.

I could go on and on, but I doubt it would sink in. I could also expound on how things have gone wrong beginning long ago...slippery slope applies in all aspects here, but it would take many pages to be somewhat inclusive.

Instead I will just let the ignorance propagate, since that seems to be how things work in this world. Enlightenment is hard... lazy people just claim it without actually doing the work. The result is obvious in all they write and say: willful and blind ignorance.

" But, Mousie, thou art no thy lane,
In proving foresight may be vain;
The best laid schemes o' Mice an' Men,
Gang aft agley,
An' lea'e us nought but grief an' pain,
For promis'd joy!

-- "To A Mouse" by Robert Burns


Uhh ok. Nice rant. You didn't address what I said though. What does your reply have to do with the Founders being the oligarchs of their time? Or with special interests existing in America since the beginning? Or with morality not being a per-requisite to American values? Every point I made still stands. But you skipped over them.

And I wasn't "ignoring" anything, I was responding to a post you made. I addressed what you posted. If you had posted the rant you just did, I would have responded to the points mentioned in that post (maybe). But you posted about America now being run by special interests, money, and moral corrupt people. So I responded to that. So how was I "ignoring" points you didn't even mention?



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 09:33 PM
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a reply to: research100

Smart lawyer



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 11:02 PM
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originally posted by: alienjuggalo
Wow I just don't know what to say this guy was clearly running away with his back facing the cop..

At least they charged him with murder. I guess with this video evidence they cant not charge him.

www.postandcourier.com...


A North Charleston police officer was arrested on a murder charge Tuesday after video surfaced of the lawman shooting eight times at 50-year-old Walter Scott as he ran away.

Scott died Saturday after Patrolman 1st Class Michael Slager, 33, shot him in the back.

The State Law Enforcement Division, which looked into whether the shooting was justified, confirmed that the officer had been booked into Charleston County’s jail late Tuesday afternoon on a murder charge.




sry if this has been posted


Cue the police apologists in 3...2....1....



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 11:59 PM
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originally posted by: Blackmarketeer
At least it made front page headlines on HuffingtonPost:

POLICE MURDER CAUGHT ON TAPE



In Texas the guy who filmed this would have broken the law.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 12:02 AM
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a reply to: alienjuggalo

Lol. That's got to be real its on you tube. I would think it would have spun him around or knocked him forward.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 12:14 AM
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Alright, commented on this earlier this morning. Just worked a full shift, in a public company, and no one said anything about this, even my coworkers who were very upset by the Trayvon Martin, Mike Brown, and Eric Garner cases. For the record my brief thoughts on those cases are: Martin, two idiots encountered each other one could fight, one had a gun; Brown, lots of questions I don't agree with no indictment but concede it would have been an uphill battle for a conviction; Garner, total travesty and the system failed. At first glance this incident is beyond deplorable, and the actions of the officer warrant the most serious consequence the law offers.

I've kept up with opinions story through my cell phone through the day, on various diverse websites. There is a consensus, if not near unanimity, that this is a bad shoot. I know more information is probably going to come out, but with what we have in front of us at this point there really is no other logical conclusion.

With no new information coming out, I've been most interested in the reactions of the American people to this event. Even the police apologists on CNN and other networks say this is a bad shoot. With the lack of new information, I've been mostly monitoring the comment sections on popular websites and news sources.

This is the first news event where I've ever seen a majority of the comments on WND, Huffpost, and theblaze; be in agreement. If that's not a sign of the apocalypse I don't know what is. There are of course outlier comments like "wait till the Teabaggers start a go fund me page for this cop" from the huffpost or " wait until the BGI (black grievance industry) shows up" on WND, but the majority is condemnation of this event regardless of political persuasion.

Most telling are the comments I've seen on LEO friendly sites like AR15.com or LEO specific sites like officer.com. If you look at the history of comments on these two particular sites in cases like Garner and Brown you'll see a much different point of view, than the consensus on this one.

There is no doubt that Officer Slager deserves his day in front of a Jury of His Peers. There is nothing in the video that justifies use of lethal force, nor in the known circumstances of why the officer was in a scuffle with Mr. Scott. Someone wanted on a failure to pay child support does not fall under acceptable use of force on a fleeing suspect, regardless of what happened before the video started.

Kudos for the local authorities for charging and firing the officer on short order. As a Southerner, I find it extemely ironic that a "racist" Southern jurisdiction has already done more in this than the NYPD and NY prosecutor did in the case of Eric Garner.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 12:19 AM
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a reply to: LA1IMPALA

You uh just joining in? ..cop has been fired, charged with murder, and currently residing in jail with bail denied.
Your post suggest because he did not spin around in hollywood fashion it might be a fake..lol

edit on 9-4-2015 by vonclod because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 12:26 AM
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I wonder how long this rotten apple will survive in prison?




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