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Mars Glaciers; Enough Water Ice On Mars To Cover The Whole Planet 1 Meter Deep

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posted on Apr, 7 2015 @ 04:50 PM
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originally posted by: alienjuggalo
a reply to: stormbringer1701

This makes me think of that ats thread saying all the water on earth would fit in a a ball the size of one of our states

I can't realty remember the size of the ball or even the thread but I know it's here somewhere

It just shows if there is enough to cover the whole planet with a meter then there could easily have been very deep oceans with a lot of dry land

the water evidence and topography suggest an ocean that covered quite a bit of the planet and that was over a kilometer deep. there are articles on that from a month or so back.




posted on Apr, 7 2015 @ 05:31 PM
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originally posted by: Jonjonj
a reply to: intrptr

I think that the information provided above is more recent, and that maybe the rover was at the wrong place. This article is talking about glacial belts and might be a completely different thing. Yes?


So fresh water glaciers on Mars, okay. (rolls eyes). Is there a lake, too with palm trees and fruit?

The clue is they say "equivalent" of this much fresh water ice-- if they refine it, separate it, melt it, filter it, put it in a glass…



posted on Apr, 7 2015 @ 05:35 PM
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In general, I imagine that a large enough impactor would melt a lot of ice for some period of time as well. When volatilized, even produce an atmosphere of sorts for a while…

An atmosphere, like Titan, mostly volatile gasses suspended in the raised temperature from the residual heat.



posted on Apr, 7 2015 @ 05:38 PM
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If we sent a 4 billion gallon bottle of gin, 1 cup of vermouth, and a 500 mile wide olive, we'd have a giant space cocktail.

mmmmmmmmmmmmmm. . . . . space martini's. . . . .



posted on Apr, 7 2015 @ 06:34 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: Jonjonj
a reply to: intrptr

I think that the information provided above is more recent, and that maybe the rover was at the wrong place. This article is talking about glacial belts and might be a completely different thing. Yes?


So fresh water glaciers on Mars, okay. (rolls eyes). Is there a lake, too with palm trees and fruit?

The clue is they say "equivalent" of this much fresh water ice-- if they refine it, separate it, melt it, filter it, put it in a glass…


I see no need for the sarcasm. I apologise if this information is not to your liking. It would be a good idea to refute the idea with information.



posted on Apr, 7 2015 @ 11:42 PM
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a reply to: stormbringer1701

If someone said that 20 years ago, they would call him lunatic. Even 10 y ago.

Today the advanced minds say other things and they are called lunatics or set aside in silence. This attitude won't be awarded when They finally come.



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 04:00 AM
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a reply to: crappiekat

Watch Cosmos by either Carl Sagan or Neil deGrasse Tyson, you'll learn quite a bit about that sort of stuff. Great intros into astronomy and astrophysics for the uninitiated.



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 04:29 AM
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a reply to: stormbringer1701

Due to lower gravity I'd be inclined to get water at Ceres.

contains 200 million cubic kilometers of water, which is more than the amount of fresh water on Earth.[59]

Ceres - internal structure



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 04:50 AM
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a reply to: stormbringer1701

This image was created to show how Mars would have looked a couple of billion years ago , it was created using topographical data collected by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter .




posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 07:13 AM
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originally posted by: gortex
a reply to: stormbringer1701

This image was created to show how Mars would have looked a couple of billion years ago , it was created using topographical data collected by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter .


Except I don't think there would have been anything green on that planet. On Earth, it took several billion years for the most primitive single-celled microorganisms to evolve into photosynthesising plants. Mars, even with seas of water, would have been a barren desert planet.
edit on 8-4-2015 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 07:52 AM
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a reply to: Jonjonj


I see no need for the sarcasm.

I did. Unless water ice is trapped in other ice or below ground on Mars it will evaporate and escape to space. It is mixed with other elements, "glaciers of fresh water ice" don't exist on Mars. Not like we know they do here.

Scientists that need support for their exploration budgets tell you this. That and "possible life" are the carrots dangled before the public all the time.



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 08:03 AM
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a reply to: gortex

Mars is to small to retain an atmosphere that "could" resemble the earth in that pic. Thats why Mars looks like it does.

Goldilocks Zone



The reason that Mars has such a thin atmosphere is Mars does not have a magnetic field like Earth does and thus has no magnetosphere. Because Mars does not have a magnetosphere, the solar wind and cosmic radiation can attack the atmosphere directly and "burn" it off.


Or some such…



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 09:40 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Your Link was from 2013. Sorry to say that was about a couple years. The OP link was from this year so I'm more lending to take the words from a source that's got more new info.



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 10:02 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Jonjonj


I see no need for the sarcasm.

I did. Unless water ice is trapped in other ice or below ground on Mars it will evaporate and escape to space. It is mixed with other elements, "glaciers of fresh water ice" don't exist on Mars. Not like we know they do here.

Scientists that need support for their exploration budgets tell you this. That and "possible life" are the carrots dangled before the public all the time.



But the article clearly states that the glacial water ice is under a thick layer of dust, which has impeded evaporation.



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 10:13 AM
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originally posted by: Jonjonj

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Jonjonj


I see no need for the sarcasm.

I did. Unless water ice is trapped in other ice or below ground on Mars it will evaporate and escape to space. It is mixed with other elements, "glaciers of fresh water ice" don't exist on Mars. Not like we know they do here.

Scientists that need support for their exploration budgets tell you this. That and "possible life" are the carrots dangled before the public all the time.




But the article clearly states that the glacial water ice is under a thick layer of dust, which has impeded evaporation.

But doesn't' go not to say how much of the 'ice' in 'glacier like' formations is in fact water ice.


That the ice has not evaporated out into space could actually mean that the thick layer of dust is protecting the ice. The atmospheric pressure on Mars is so low that water ice simply evaporates and becomes water vapour. But the glaciers are well protected under the thick layer of dust.

Read more at: phys.org...



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 10:18 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: Jonjonj

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Jonjonj


I see no need for the sarcasm.

I did. Unless water ice is trapped in other ice or below ground on Mars it will evaporate and escape to space. It is mixed with other elements, "glaciers of fresh water ice" don't exist on Mars. Not like we know they do here.

Scientists that need support for their exploration budgets tell you this. That and "possible life" are the carrots dangled before the public all the time.




But the article clearly states that the glacial water ice is under a thick layer of dust, which has impeded evaporation.

But doesn't' go not to say how much of the 'ice' in 'glacier like' formations is in fact water ice.


That the ice has not evaporated out into space could actually mean that the thick layer of dust is protecting the ice. The atmospheric pressure on Mars is so low that water ice simply evaporates and becomes water vapour. But the glaciers are well protected under the thick layer of dust.

Read more at: phys.org...


sure it does. if there is enough to cover the planet in over one meter of water then that is in fact how much water is in that ice.



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 10:25 AM
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a reply to: intrptr




Mars is to small to retain an atmosphere that "could" resemble the earth in that pic. Thats why Mars looks like it does.

Not according to NASA , Mars could and probably did resemble that picture for a billion or so years.


a reply to: wildespace



Except I don't think there would have been anything green on that planet.

We now know that Mars had a far more oxygen rich atmosphere in it's early days and was a better place for life to start than here on Earth , it's believed that life could start to evolve within 200 to 300 million years so I don't see a problem with green patches on the picture , in fact I'd bee inclined to put more on there depending where in Mars life cycle the picture represents.



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 11:27 AM
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I've been saying it for years. Mars' water is still there.

A few years ago, a lander exposed ice under the surface, I believe it was Phoenix.



Then they found water droplets under it.



This is old news to me. Some of the craters in the Northern Hemisphere look to be made in ice. Especially those in the Cydonia region.

Makes the prospect of Terraforming much more realistic.



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 12:30 PM
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a reply to: gortex


Not according to NASA , Mars could and probably did resemble that picture for a billion or so years.

Then someone there has changed the fundamental science of physics. Nice video, its a simulation. Mars simply isn't large enough to hold an atmosphere. There is no electromagnetic field to protect it from the suns radiation.

That hast changed.



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 12:31 PM
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So a question arises.
If there is water, there could be (lowlevel) life.
When we finally start to terraform mars to our needs,
wouldn´t it be the same as if another high level species just starts alienforming on our "own" (lowlevel species) planet?
(rhetorical question)

a reply to: Xeven
Earth meteorites?=??
How is that supposed to work?


edit on 8-4-2015 by verschickter because: (no reason given)




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