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Teaching an old dog new tricks. Literally. Help appreciated.

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posted on Apr, 7 2015 @ 09:47 AM
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When I was 19, my boyfriend at the time gifted me with a puppy. OMG, much cute, so wow. I Actually don't advocate giving pets as gifts, it should be a decision you make very carefully.

She was very cute, all in all. A tiny Shih-tzu, rescued from breeders who wished to have her put down after discovering she was born with only three paws and a "stump", I named her Trip. Despite the fact that the boyfriend and I broke up 6 months later, Trip and I remained inseperable. Fast forward 5 years, and I am now working 2 jobs and living above a noisy hairdressing shop. Trip hated the noise, and would bark and bark all day, causing a disturbance. My grandparents, who would sometimes keep Trip during my weekend shifts away, were kind enough to take her in. They fell in love with her and for the next 4 years she was a great companion for them, and I was able to see her whenever I liked. Two years into her stay with Gram and Papa, Papa passed away, and Trip was able to keep Gram from becoming too lonely.

Coming back to the present day, Gram is living with her various daughters, and while still in good health, has some issues that prevent her from caring for Trip. After a lot of tears, we decided Trip would come back with me. Now, my partner and I have a large Mastiff type dog, and two cats, and the transition has been okay, save for one of the cats who is very jealous. I'm sure he'll get over it.

The real issue we're having is that Trip has an issue with claiming space around me (or Gram). If other people or pets try to enter the space, it's usually the bed, she will growl and make as if she will bite someone. She's never Ctually bitten someone, I think it might be all for show. When she does this, I always make a point of putting her off of the bed, and inviting person or pets to join me in her place. It doesn't seem to ever have an effect in the long run.

I've been dealing with this issue since she was about 1. Do any of the ATS dog whisperers have any advice? I'd like her to be part of our family of people and pets, not just be here as "my dog".
edit on 7-4-2015 by Atsbhct because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 7 2015 @ 09:58 AM
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a reply to: Atsbhct


When she does this, I always make a point of putting her off of the bed, and inviting person or pets to join me in her place. It doesn't seem to ever have an effect in the long run.

The dog is exhibiting jealous behavior because you favor the other dogs on the bed. None or all. The thing is to treat them equally. It will take time because you are teaching trip he doesn't belong.

Invite them all on at once, feed them at the same time, walk them at the same time, pet them all at the same time (group hugs) remind them they are all equally loved by you. If one tries to dominate then that one gets gently reminded to accept the 'pack' together. You are the pack leader, not them. Everyone together. One happy pack.



posted on Apr, 7 2015 @ 10:00 AM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

Karen Pryor's book, Don't Shoot The Dog will be very helpful.



posted on Apr, 7 2015 @ 10:15 AM
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a reply to: Atsbhct


The real issue we're having is that Trip has an issue with claiming space around me (or Gram). If other people or pets try to enter the space, it's usually the bed, she will growl and make as if she will bite someone. She's never Ctually bitten someone, I think it might be all for show. When she does this, I always make a point of putting her off of the bed, and inviting person or pets to join me in her place. It doesn't seem to ever have an effect in the long run.


It's not only about the dog, but also your other pets. They need to realize how full of crap your dog is lol


Invite them all on at once, feed them at the same time, walk them at the same time, pet them all at the same time (group hugs) remind them they are all equally loved by you. If one tries to dominate then that one gets gently reminded to accept the 'pack' together. You are the pack leader, not them. Everyone together. One happy pack.


This is also very important. It's also important to discipline your dogs for behavior you don't like, in view of your other pets.

~Tenth



posted on Apr, 7 2015 @ 10:36 AM
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I would go on youtube and watch some episodes of the Dog Whisperer. Especially ones where he is working with smaller dogs.

He always stresses we need to put out calm, assertive energy. This ensures the dogs that you are the pack leader (of the family) and you are in charge.

Good luck!



posted on Apr, 7 2015 @ 10:47 AM
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I would suggest that Trip has taken the role of leader. Dogs tend to become more protective (or dominant, or bossy - whatever you want to call it) if the owner doesn't show the dog that THEY are the "pack leader". A dog needs a pack leader. A weak, insecure, grieving person will encourage the dog to feel that they need to lead.

What you're doing, by making her get off the bed when she acts like this, is the right thing. Make sure you're not angry when putting her off. Don't yell or become tense or aggravated. Remain calm and put her off the bed and don't let her come back on until you invite her.

I would suggest that she NOT get on the bed without your invitation, or maybe not at all for a while. She sees you and the bed and "hers". You have to let her know that the bed is yours and that YOU are the pack leader, you don't belong to her and you don't need protection. Maybe have a "place" for her beside your bed like a small doggie bed.

If you're sitting on the couch and someone comes in, don't let Trip come by you and sit on your feet or get in your lap or your space. That's a signal that she's "claiming" you. You have to claim that space around you. She will learn that you are the boss.

Most importantly, be consistent and follow through. Don't just put her off the bed and look away. When you put her off, keep an eye on her for when she starts to jump up and don't allow it. Put your hand out and say, "no" in a calm voice. Teach her to "take her place" with treats or other positive reinforcement, so that when you put her off the bed, you can give that command.

I agree with Enderdog: Don't Shoot the Dog is a great book.

A lot of people are uncomfortable with the terms "dominant" and "alpha", but if they are used correctly, I think they can be very helpful. Dogs need to know the rules. And they need to know you're the "parent". Here are a couple links that might help. Don't take every word as gospel, but you can use them as guidelines to figure out what works best for Trip.

www.loveyourdog.com...
acadogs.com...



posted on Apr, 7 2015 @ 12:55 PM
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a reply to: ArnoldNonymous

I agree with you, I have been training my two pups using the "Dog Whisper/Cesar Millan"methods. So far it is working great but it does take time and lots of patience.




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