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Scientist explores connection between Shang Dynasty China and ancient Peruvian cultures...

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posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 04:58 AM
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There is an oft-mentioned similarity between Jomon pottery and that of the Valdiva culture in Ecuador. AFAIK, no real evidence of contact has been established there either.

Harte




posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 05:19 AM
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a reply to: SLAYER69


The art does have striking similarity. There is also another lead of chinese pyramids. Mabey can be explored in a true scientific sense if chinese gov give full access to their pyramids.




Chinese pyramids are ancient mausoleums and burial mounds built to house the remains of several early emperors of China and their imperial relatives. About 38 of them are located around 25 kilometres (16 mi) - 35 kilometres (22 mi) north-west of Xi'an, on the Qin Chuan Plains in Shaanxi Province. The most famous is the Mausoleum of the First Qin Emperor, northeast of Xi'an and 1.7 km west of where the Terracotta Warriors were found[citation needed]. Chinese pyramids were also built during the Han, Tang, Song, and Western Xia dynasties.[citation needed]

They have flat tops, and thus are more similar in shape to the Teotihuacan pyramids north-east of Mexico City, Mexico than to the pyramids in Giza, Egypt. Although known in the West for at least a century, their existence has been made controversial by sensationalist publicity and the problems of Chinese archaeology in early 20th century.



They have flat tops, and thus are more similar in shape to the Teotihuacan pyramids north-east of Mexico City, Mexico than to the pyramids in Giza, Egypt

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 07:08 AM
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originally posted by: Harte
There is an oft-mentioned similarity between Jomon pottery and that of the Valdiva culture in Ecuador. AFAIK, no real evidence of contact has been established there either.

Harte


I believe you and I have discussed the Jomon pottery connection scenario a few times over the years. If so, that would make a possible connection much earlier than has been discussed.

no?



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 01:17 PM
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originally posted by: SLAYER69

originally posted by: Harte

There is an oft-mentioned similarity between Jomon pottery and that of the Valdiva culture in Ecuador. AFAIK, no real evidence of contact has been established there either.



Harte




I believe you and I have discussed the Jomon pottery connection scenario a few times over the years. If so, that would make a possible connection much earlier than has been discussed.



no?




Yes, it's come up, and no, not necessarily.

I mean it's true that the Jomon are truly ancient - dating back to 10,000 BC or so, but they were still around in about 300 BC.

The Valdivia culture lasted from the mid 36th century BC to just after 2000 BC.

Harte



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 12:54 AM
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originally posted by: Oannes
The Olmecs appear to be black Africans. Specifically of the Mande group. They possibly came over with Nin.gish.zidda (Thoth) in 3113b.c.. There main function was as miners in search of precious metals. They are responsible for a lot of the megalithic structures found in Mesoamerica. They brought the design for the pyramid from Africa.


This is absolute nonsense. They look exactly like the native Americans present in the region. What is more, we know that no Africans made it to the Americas in large numbers before slavery due to the genetic and physical anthropology work of Ruben Lisker and Cristi tuner.

Debunking "Black Olmec" in 23 Seconds - YouTube


The Face of a Tzotzil Does Not Lie - YouTube


The thread is ridiculous. Peruvian civilization is OLDER than Chinese. What is more, and "similarities" being cited are superficial. Why no Chinese writing in Peru?



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 12:56 AM
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originally posted by: AthlonSavage
a reply to: SLAYER69


The art does have striking similarity. There is also another lead of chinese pyramids. Mabey can be explored in a true scientific sense if chinese gov give full access to their pyramids.




Chinese pyramids are ancient mausoleums and burial mounds built to house the remains of several early emperors of China and their imperial relatives. About 38 of them are located around 25 kilometres (16 mi) - 35 kilometres (22 mi) north-west of Xi'an, on the Qin Chuan Plains in Shaanxi Province. The most famous is the Mausoleum of the First Qin Emperor, northeast of Xi'an and 1.7 km west of where the Terracotta Warriors were found[citation needed]. Chinese pyramids were also built during the Han, Tang, Song, and Western Xia dynasties.[citation needed]

They have flat tops, and thus are more similar in shape to the Teotihuacan pyramids north-east of Mexico City, Mexico than to the pyramids in Giza, Egypt. Although known in the West for at least a century, their existence has been made controversial by sensationalist publicity and the problems of Chinese archaeology in early 20th century.



They have flat tops, and thus are more similar in shape to the Teotihuacan pyramids north-east of Mexico City, Mexico than to the pyramids in Giza, Egypt

en.wikipedia.org...



The main difference is that Chinese "pyramids" are actually mounds of tamped earth, and the Pyramids of Mexico are some of the greatest works of stone architecture ever.



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 01:06 AM
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a reply to: cachibatches

I've said it before, but I'm going to say it again: It's nice to have another rational mind around these parts. You're not going to be popular, but your presence is quite welcome.



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 08:11 AM
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Evidence of Pre-Columbus Trade Found in Alaska House


Bronze artifacts discovered in a 1,000-year-old house in Alaska suggest trade was occurring between East Asia and the New World centuries before the voyages of Columbus.

Archaeologists found the artifacts at the "Rising Whale" site at Cape Espenberg.

"When you're looking at the site from a little ways away, it looks like a bowhead [whale] coming to the surface," said Owen Mason, a research associate at the University of Colorado, who is part of a team excavating the site.

The new discoveries, combined with other finds made over the past 100 years, suggest trade items and ideas were reaching Alaska from East Asian civilizations well before Christopher Columbus arrived in the Caribbean Sea in 1492 archaeologists said. [See Images of the New Discoveries at the Rising Whale Site]

"We're seeing the interactions, indirect as they are, with these so-called 'high civilizations' of China, Korea or Yakutia," a region in Russia, Mason said.

Bronze and obsidian

The Rising Whale discoveries include two bronze artifacts, one of which may have originally been used as a buckle or fastener. It has a piece of leather on it thatradiocarbondates to around A.D. 600 (more tests will take place in the future). The other bronze artifact may have been used as a whistle.

Bronze-working had not been developed at this time in Alaska, so archaeologists think the artifacts would have been manufactured in China, Korea or Yakutia, and made their way to Alaska through trade routes.

Also inside that house, researchers found the remains of obsidian artifacts, which have a chemical signature that indicates the obsidian is from the Anadyr River valley in Russia.

Trade routes

The recent discoveries at the Rising Whale site add to over a century of research that indicates trade routes connected the Bering Strait (including the Alaskan side) with the civilizations that flourished in East Asia before Columbus' time. [Top 5 Misconceptions About Columbus]

In 1913, anthropologist Berthold Laufer published an analysis of texts and artifacts in the journal T'oung Pao in which he found that the Chinese had a great interest in obtaining ivory from narwhals and walruses, acquiring it from people who lived to the northeast of China. Some of the walrus ivory may have come from the Bering Strait, where the animals are found in abundance.

Additionally, a number of researchers have noted similarities in design between the plate armor worn by people in Alaska and that worn in China, Korea, Japan and eastern Mongolia.

For instance, in the 1930s, Smithsonian Institution archaeologist Henry Collins undertook excavations at St. Lawrence Island, off the west coast of Alaska. In his book "The Archaeology of St. Lawrence Island" (Smithsonian, 1937), he wrote that plate armor started appearing on the island around 1,000 years ago. It consisted of overlapping plates made of ivory, bones and sometimes iron.

Plate armor similar to this was developed in several areas of East Asia, including Manchuria (in China), eastern Mongolia and Japan, Collins wrote. The use of plate armor, he said, spread north from these areas, and was eventually introduced to Alaska from across the Bering Strait. Bronze artifacts discovered in a 1,000-year-old house in Alaska suggest trade was occurring between East Asia and the New World centuries before the voyages of Columbus.

Archaeologists found the artifacts at the "Rising Whale" site at Cape Espenberg.

"When you're looking at the site from a little ways away, it looks like a bowhead [whale] coming to the surface," said Owen Mason, a research associate at the University of Colorado, who is part of a team excavating the site.

The new discoveries, combined with other finds made over the past 100 years, suggest trade items and ideas were reaching Alaska from East Asian civilizations well before Christopher Columbus arrived in the Caribbean Sea in 1492 archaeologists said. [See Images of the New Discoveries at the Rising Whale Site]

"We're seeing the interactions, indirect as they are, with these so-called 'high civilizations' of China, Korea or Yakutia," a region in Russia, Mason said.

Bronze and obsidian

The Rising Whale discoveries include two bronze artifacts, one of which may have originally been used as a buckle or fastener. It has a piece of leather on it thatradiocarbondates to around A.D. 600 (more tests will take place in the future). The other bronze artifact may have been used as a whistle.

Bronze-working had not been developed at this time in Alaska, so archaeologists think the artifacts would have been manufactured in China, Korea or Yakutia, and made their way to Alaska through trade routes.

Also inside that house, researchers found the remains of obsidian artifacts, which have a chemical signature that indicates the obsidian is from the Anadyr River valley in Russia.

Trade routes

The recent discoveries at the Rising Whale site add to over a century of research that indicates trade routes connected the Bering Strait (including the Alaskan side) with the civilizations that flourished in East Asia before Columbus' time. [Top 5 Misconceptions About Columbus]

In 1913, anthropologist Berthold Laufer published an analysis of texts and artifacts in the journal T'oung Pao in which he found that the Chinese had a great interest in obtaining ivory from narwhals and walruses, acquiring it from people who lived to the northeast of China. Some of the walrus ivory may have come from the Bering Strait, where the animals are found in abundance.

Additionally, a number of researchers have noted similarities in design between the plate armor worn by people in Alaska and that worn in China, Korea, Japan and eastern Mongolia.

For instance, in the 1930s, Smithsonian Institution archaeologist Henry Collins undertook excavations at St. Lawrence Island, off the west coast of Alaska. In his book "The Archaeology of St. Lawrence Island" (Smithsonian, 1937), he wrote that plate armor started appearing on the island around 1,000 years ago. It consisted of overlapping plates made of ivory, bones and sometimes iron.

Plate armor similar to this was developed in several areas of East Asia, including Manchuria (in China), eastern Mongolia and Japan, Collins wrote. The use of plate armor, he said, spread north from these areas, and was eventually introduced to Alaska from across the Bering Strait.
news.yahoo.com...

Maybe some one else had posted this as I didn't check but this was out 22hrs ago, rather than starting at new topic this make a perfect fit right here.

And Cachibatches,while one can rule out Africans in the Olmec era Americas one cannot rule out Blacks that looked African .



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 08:32 AM
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Not to throw a kink into this theory but 23andme will sequence your mitochondrial and paternal(if you're a male) DNA. In looking at my results they can estimate when mutations were introduced and from what general part of the world said mutations were expressed.....and when(pre 500 years ago)
With that in mind, the genome which encompasses all(most) Clovis and potentially pre-Clovis are almost entirely distinct from Chinese markers. The most closely associated genomes are that of the eastern Asian populations(non Chinese)...think Jomon people of Japan.
That being said, it is VERY possible that the lines with either Chinese or West African lines are long since dead from Inquisition era diseases...
I LOVE your threads Slayer....you and Phage are the two main reasons I come to this site...
Keep up your AWESOME posts and know you have a big fan in Texas!
-Christosterone



posted on Apr, 19 2015 @ 09:37 AM
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originally posted by: cachibatches

originally posted by: AthlonSavage
a reply to: SLAYER69


The art does have striking similarity. There is also another lead of chinese pyramids. Mabey can be explored in a true scientific sense if chinese gov give full access to their pyramids.




Chinese pyramids are ancient mausoleums and burial mounds built to house the remains of several early emperors of China and their imperial relatives. About 38 of them are located around 25 kilometres (16 mi) - 35 kilometres (22 mi) north-west of Xi'an, on the Qin Chuan Plains in Shaanxi Province. The most famous is the Mausoleum of the First Qin Emperor, northeast of Xi'an and 1.7 km west of where the Terracotta Warriors were found[citation needed]. Chinese pyramids were also built during the Han, Tang, Song, and Western Xia dynasties.[citation needed]

They have flat tops, and thus are more similar in shape to the Teotihuacan pyramids north-east of Mexico City, Mexico than to the pyramids in Giza, Egypt. Although known in the West for at least a century, their existence has been made controversial by sensationalist publicity and the problems of Chinese archaeology in early 20th century.



They have flat tops, and thus are more similar in shape to the Teotihuacan pyramids north-east of Mexico City, Mexico than to the pyramids in Giza, Egypt

en.wikipedia.org...



The main difference is that Chinese "pyramids" are actually mounds of tamped earth, and the Pyramids of Mexico are some of the greatest works of stone architecture ever.

Mostly built as shells over mounds of tamped earth and rock. The Chinese didn't add the shell. Nor were Chinese pyramid mounds, for the most part, "true" pyramids in shape. That is, they often have rectangular rather than square bases.

Different architecture and different cultures.

Harte




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