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I'm starting an off-grid comunity.

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posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 03:30 PM
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a reply to: XxNightAngelusxX

Just because your friends aren't interested doesn't mean you can't pursue it!

Gaining self-sufficiency is a great goal, and can be worked towards while you are living anywhere. There are, of course, codes which prohibit some things. But, they don't apply to small scale work. Working on and with a small scale system can help gain a lot of experience as well as test out your own ideas. Depending on your municipality, you may even be able to do some full scale stuff.

The actual location isn't as important as the ability and knowledge to be self-sufficient in the first place, in my opinion. It's not too hard to learn about it, especially with the internet, but actually succeeding in the real world is a much different story.

Beyond that, creativity and innovation tend to enter the picture after the real world experience. Getting that experience can be done anywhere, and I think it's hard to put a price on it. And who knows, you might even come up with some innovative idea that really changes the world..
edit on 8-4-2015 by Serdgiam because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 05:18 PM
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originally posted by: Thecakeisalie
a reply to: Ghost147

It sure beats my idea.

If it was up to me then i'd place a settlement at the foot of the mountains where the summer thaw and seasonal rains could provide clean water for crops and the community all year round-but as for providing energy for mod cons then I have no idea-I'm guessing that basing a community in the foothills would need to be able to make the best of the sunlight that is available-perhaps a six hour window.

This is why I try not to think too much.


This would be ideal for us too, in a 'wanted' sense. As you pointed out though, sunlight would be much more rare in comparison to, say, being on top of a small hill. Although we do plan on being as close to mountains as possible; without disrupting any of our energy supply.


originally posted by: FamCore
a reply to: Ghost147

An ambitious project to say the least! Sounds like you have thought of pretty much everything - have you heard of "Earthships"? I ask because this guy who invented the term/concept has developed off-the-grid communities and has some innovative ideas that may help you on your journey. I would highly recommend watching the documentary about Earthships, since it may give you some really helpful ideas. The man who created the concept of earthships also uses recycled materials/trash (such as used tires, which help the buildings store thermal heat from the sun), which could also help with the pricing of materials.
Anyway, here is the full documentary if you have time or interest in learning more. I wish you the best of luck on your endeavor and hope you will keep us updated on how the projects are coming



Thanks for the link! We have heard of 'Earthships', and have done a little research regarding his projects. I do want to know more as any innovative applications we can use to our advantage is clearly welcome. I'll have to take a look at that video. Thanks again!

a reply to: boohoo

I completely agree! If we don't have a solid foundation, we're going to be looking at a lot of trouble and headaches within the years to come. Fortunately I have several Lawyers in the family, they'll be able to point me in the right direction both legally, and in search of specialists that deal with these sort of things.

Thanks for the suggestions



originally posted by: Serdgiam
I personally believe that small, strong, self sufficient, and innovative communities are the future for us. The next step in our social and cultural evolution, connected like never before through technology.

Me and my group are doing something similar. Rather than focus on being off grid though, we are focusing on self sufficiency bolstered by technology. Our goal is to mix simple, but extraordinarily clever, old world techniques with cutting edge technology.

From my own experience, wait until you own specific property before making all the plans. Some pieces of land may offer opportunities that were not considered and going through all variables before hand can be exceedingly time consuming.


Very good advice. We had considered the possibility of new opportunities depending on the land we end up purchasing. There was one contender that looked fantastic for us, and it had a large river running alongside it. In which case we would need to purchase the rights to use the water (annually, i believe) for both power supply and usable water.

I'd like to know more about your current plan if you're interested in sharing?



originally posted by: boohoo

originally posted by: MystikMushroom
You might want to think up a craft or trade skill you an trade for money to pay the property tax, and who knows -- you might need an odd item here or there. It couldn't hurt to have a little income source now and then.


Thats why I said they need to form a separate corporation or co-op, so they can generate money for taxes, fines and permits, upkeep, etc, while keeping the "business stuff" separate from the entity that owns land they live on. Its a lot more complicated and expensive than people imagine. This was done on purpose by government to keep people within the system at any cost, while preventing them from going out to be neo-pioneers, due to having limited financing to fight back in legal disputes.


Yes, we're putting a lot of thought and research into the matter. We've looked at a few different studies that evaluate profitability of Aquaponics farms in the united states. The study looked at (i believe) about 50 different farms over several years. The most profitable had a sort of "hybrid" company in which they sold their fish/produce, and also sold aquaponics systems as well.

We will be doing so similarly. Although, with the additive of how we generate many of our power sources, we also have the option of selling organic byproducts as well. In the years to come we want to set up an educational group that uses studies we have conducted to further advance the efficiency of aquaponics, off-grid living, and green energy generation.

Among those concepts we also want to expand the company to work within major cities on a commercial level. When we achieve this we have the option to expand all over the country (and further), reducing shipping costs and our environmental footprint, all while exponentially expanding the amount of fish and produce we can provide for the market, all while maintaining an Organic property to the products.



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 05:26 PM
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originally posted by: XxNightAngelusxX
Do it.

Absolutely, positively, DO it.

You have NO IDEA how lucky you are to have such valuable, driven friends at your side. What you're doing is a dream of mine. Unfortunately, none of my friends care enough to even consider something like this. It frustrates me to no end to care so much about people who simply refuse to care themselves.

You have something I long for. Utilize it.

Good luck.


Thanks for the support! There are a lot of like-minded individuals out there that are more than willing to put similar concepts into action. Just because your current acquaintances don't share the same vision, doesn't mean you can't find additional ones that do.

Nevertheless, if all my friends decide one day that "nah, i'm not going to do it anymore", I still will be doing it. All that would have changed is that I'll need to learn more skills and use all my savings, instead of a group assistance.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 12:10 AM
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a reply to: Ghost147
S&F for some great ideas. British Columbia is beautiful (some consider it the best part of Canada), but I would be worried about the chain of volcanoes on the West Coast and the Cascadian subduction zone. You might be better off moving farther inland, north of Idaho/Montana. Just a thought. Good luck.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 12:26 AM
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Ghost,

I've lived this life. I will tell you this, it always looks quite rosy from where you sit. However, it will be an incredible amount of work. Satisfying work? Sometimes. But a lot of work nonetheless. There won't be a lot of idle time. The more sophisticated your setup, the more things that will break and require repairs. The more simple your setup, the more manual labor required. Believe it or not, the lifestyle does get old. At least, it did for me. Good luck, in any event.



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 04:09 AM
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originally posted by: AuranVector
a reply to: Ghost147
S&F for some great ideas. British Columbia is beautiful (some consider it the best part of Canada), but I would be worried about the chain of volcanoes on the West Coast and the Cascadian subduction zone. You might be better off moving farther inland, north of Idaho/Montana. Just a thought. Good luck.


I'm not very concerned about volcanoes in BC. the vast majority haven't erupted for tens of thousands of years. Nevertheless, I'm not going to settle on top of one that may be considered inactive, or in the path of what would be lava flow if we happen to be near one.

Honestly, I'm more concerned about Yellowstone than anything else really. Although the only thing that we could do to be totally secure from Yellowstone would be to get the heck out of North America in general. There is only so much preparation a person can do before you sacrifice your entire life and dedicate it entirely to prepping alone.


originally posted by: Guidance.Is.Internal
Ghost,

I've lived this life. I will tell you this, it always looks quite rosy from where you sit. However, it will be an incredible amount of work. Satisfying work? Sometimes. But a lot of work nonetheless. There won't be a lot of idle time. The more sophisticated your setup, the more things that will break and require repairs. The more simple your setup, the more manual labor required. Believe it or not, the lifestyle does get old. At least, it did for me. Good luck, in any event.


Thanks for the warnings. Fortunately, we all come from excessive heavy labor backgrounds. We're aware of what we have the potential to face during the years to follow. The difference is that the labor we will be doing, even if it is far more strenuous, is far better than anything we are doing currently.

Thank you for your best wishes. Hopefully in our experimentation with new ways of generating power, food, and profitability, we may one day be able to turn you back to that sort of life?



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 01:55 PM
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a reply to: Ghost147

I have worked in the trades as well. All industrial/commercial work. I had a large bank roll, too. Chances are, it will be more strenuous than your current work and the stakes will be higher. I decided that (for me, in my early 30's) the best all around lifestyle is country living with some modern amenities. There's no getting around it, the more cozy you want to be, the more divorced you will be from nature and more dependent you will be on society. Batteries? Generator windings? Light bulbs? Refrigeration compressors? Pumps? Metalworking? Building materials? Tools? That's not off-grid, but somewhere between the two extremes. In my opinion, the only true off-grid lifestyle is that lived by natives. All materials derived directly from nature, complete vertical integration. That is a very, very rough life - and why so few continue that tradition.
edit on 9-4-2015 by Guidance.Is.Internal because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 05:53 PM
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a reply to: Guidance.Is.Internal

Hmm, I believe we're at a disagreement on what Off-Grid Living really is. Personally, from what you described I would call that more minimalist living than anything else; which is not what we're trying to achieve in this project. All we're attempting to accomplish is to be as self sufficient as possible, without being required to rely on external resources.

There are a few aspects in the project which would be irrational for us to choose not to the use of external companies, products, or resources. However, we will always keep our mentality in focus of attempting to use as little of those factors as possible.

Off-Grid, to us, simply means that we don't run off of external power sources, We grow as much as our own food as possible (if not all), and that we are secluded from general society. Having the same modern amenities -just by our own design- does not really apply to our view of off-grid living; from a personal perspective.



posted on Apr, 22 2015 @ 02:59 PM
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Right, but the items mentioned above are maintenance items if you are using such technology, like refrigeration, light bulbs, etc. Doubtful you'll be producing these, so will still be dependent on others for these types of items.

Nothing wrong with that either.



posted on Apr, 22 2015 @ 03:27 PM
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originally posted by: Gazrok
Right, but the items mentioned above are maintenance items if you are using such technology, like refrigeration, light bulbs, etc. Doubtful you'll be producing these, so will still be dependent on others for these types of items.

Nothing wrong with that either.


Yes, We understand that we will be using common consumable items. That, actually, is one of our main focuses. We want to show that off-grid living (as in making our own food and supplying our own water and power) can still be feasible within a modern setting.

Essentially, we want to pluck a house out of the city, drop it in the forest, tweak all the in's-and-outs of power, water, and waist, keep it self sustainable and green, then call it a day.



posted on Apr, 22 2015 @ 04:56 PM
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You are better off spending your money in a warmer climate, where you wont have to spend time dealing with dangers.

Arkansas is probably the easiest place to set up a Commune, But if you truly want to Paradise on earth? Move to the Islands in the Caribbean, where land mass is smaller and cheaper to move around. Plus where there's an abundance of food easily caught.

Living on a Sailboat gives you freedom of movement..you don't want to be trapped in Continent if Martial law were on the table....Thermal imagers cant see underwater


Better to save your money and move to a better Scenario. Buy an island and they will pay to come and play



posted on Apr, 22 2015 @ 05:24 PM
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It sounds idyllic, wish I could do likewise but my health won't permit me to do much strenuous labor which is the bulk of what it takes to live off-grid.

The very first picture of the home near the creek - I wanted to point out something wrong with it: it's built inside the floodplain. It may not happen for years but it will happen - the creek will rise and wash the foundation out. Spend a great deal of time studying the land, what grows where, how water flows in a hard rain, where birds like to nest etc. It will help in the planning instead of drawing a design on paper and imposing on the land let the land dictate to you where things work best, it will be a blessing to you in the long run and cause the least damage to the place that you will grow to love.

I wish you success and happiness and most of all a return to a sane life living in harmony with the land.



posted on Apr, 22 2015 @ 05:41 PM
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a reply to: Mister_Bit




Sadly though in Britain there just isn't the space to even give it credible thought beyond a dream.


That is true to a very large extent ... But I have done it I.E. ... Lived a fully self sufficient lifestyle within a community of 30 or so people on a small island in the Orkneys just off the top the Scotland ...



posted on Apr, 22 2015 @ 06:14 PM
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a reply to: SPECULUM

The issue with warmer climates and islands is the excessive amount of natural disasters. -25 celcius isn't really considered a danger to us. I work outside in -40 to -55 during the winter at times. Where we would be located -25 would be an extreme. the average winter temperature is only -10, which is T-shirt weather


Another issue with islands is the limited amount of resources (depending on the size and location of the island). We would have an overabundance where we would be located.
edit on 22/4/15 by Ghost147 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 22 2015 @ 08:20 PM
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a reply to: Ghost147

Sure. Ive lived on a 30 Acre farm in southwest Missouri over 25 years. Ive had the pleasure of hanging with various Survival Tribes and Communes throughout Missouri and Arkansas and have seen all the issues associated when bringing strangers who claim to have the same goals as you and your beginning group. It all sounds so wonderful, and its not to say that it wont be? but always consider that time will move on and you wont get any younger, and its not to say that you will never have the ability to move on if things change. Its just easier to get it right the first time and save yourself the hassle. St Croix USVI, or the British Virgin islands have unlimited resources, and depending which country you are from? passports are not required. 100 plus flights fly in and out daily and distance of travel are minimal, because some of these islands are 20 miles long, which literal cuts out on fuel consumption.

There are many tricks to this, and most aren't wrong, but ultimately having freedom of movement is the plan.or should be.

I'd rather get caught in a rare Hurricane in Paradise, than get trapped in a Vast frozen Subzero environment that requires so many things to keep it together.


edit on 22-4-2015 by SPECULUM because: more cowbell



posted on Apr, 22 2015 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: SPECULUM

I understand where you're coming from, but islands are simply not an option for us. We're concerned about rising water levels, and any where near a few hundred km of any ocean is just a No-Go for us.

-25 for a month on end is far rarer than a hurricane would be in the areas that would be possible for us. Nevertheless, we would have backup systems in place if such an occurrence were to take place. Again, -25 is not an issue anyways (for us at least).

When it comes down to location, I would say many of us have a picturesque idea on which would be best. However, these very locations are exceptionally subjective.

I'm not saying that you can get similar, or even better scenarios in one place over another; I'm just saying that for our particular needs as individuals, the locations we've scoped out would fit us best



posted on Apr, 23 2015 @ 10:13 AM
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Yea these types of communities always end well.



posted on Apr, 23 2015 @ 06:51 PM
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a reply to: knightrider078

It would be fantastic if you could elaborate, considering you come off as a sort of expert in the field.
edit on 23/4/15 by Ghost147 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 23 2015 @ 09:27 PM
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200 Acres in BC Canada is probably extremely expensive? which means that the Property taxes will be expensive as well, unless you Establish it as a Church, and have Non-Profit Status, Which means you have lots of hurdles to overcome and set up a trust.
Liabilities and insurances have to be involved, which means bonds and rules must be written..Basically you must be a form of a Corporation to cover your asses when unscrupulous members/visitors get involved...OH and lets not forget local governments and law enforcement when unknown laws have been broken, when they surface.

I know this all might seem so innocent and exciting, but real liabilities are involved.

I will give you a valuable piece of advice to cut through most of the red tape...Become a Club and Charge a Membership Fee. This will keep most of the riff raff out and it keeps all the Control in your hands, in the event it goes south. and be sure to set it up as a limited liability corporation..To Cover all your Butts



posted on Apr, 24 2015 @ 12:25 AM
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a reply to: SPECULUM

We've actually brought up all the issues you've listed earlier in the topic. All except the club membership fee. We've considered that as a viable option, though (outside of the forum).

Perhaps I'm not coming off as serious as I feel. However, I assure you I'm not taking any of this lightly. We're looking in to all the local laws, permits and necessities we would need to pull this off legally, and in an affordable manner. For 200 acres we've found several locations that range from between $150k-$400k. Yes, we realize that we could find that amount of land for $50k in other places, but the concept we're planning on will work best in that area.



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