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NEWS: Mature Video Games Face New Regulation in Illinois

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posted on Dec, 20 2004 @ 08:53 AM
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This entire story is part of a wake-up call for both parents and local government leaders alike. Apparently, the governor of Illinois wants to make it a crime to sell video games to children under the age of eighteen. His goal is to protect children from being exposed to such degrading material and also help parents who may not know what their children are being exposed to nor have a clue about the potential negative effect such exposure could have on their children. While some video stores already have a policy in place, the governor wants to make sure that every store does.
 



www.nbc5.com
MOLINE -- It's not hard to find the eye-grabbing images from violent or sexually explicit video games. They're hot sellers this holiday season in stores all over the country. But in Illinois, Gov. Rod Blagojevich wants it to be a crime to sell, rent or distribute those games to kids under 18.

"It's our job as parents or leaders to make sure we properly regulate our society," Gov. Blagojevich said.

Inside Video Games Etc. in Moline, Lori Hanna is buying the store's last copy of "Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas" -- one of those mature titles -- for her 16 year old son. "He just wrote it on his Christmas list," she said. "I looked at it, and it looked okay, so I bought it."



Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Illinois has just put a wrench in the heightening and unstoppable influence of violent and highly explicit video games manufactured by the gaming industry. Parents actually buy these games of this nature for their children not even realizing sometimes how violent or explicit these games can be or how much of a negative influence it can have on our children. I believe that Illinois has taken a step in the right direction with this idea, but only a small step. There is only so much the state can do to control the people that reside in the numerous communities the particular region they govern. For one thing, the general public has to be aware of everything the state is trying to do otherwise people are going to be breaking the law without even knowing that they are or not taking it serious. It should be law for at least everyone over the age eighteen who resides in this state in particular to attend local county meetings at least once or twice a month so that they can not only be aware of the laws and issues affecting a particular area, but also be pro-active in participating in community events where they're individual voices can be heard. There is a great lack of communication between the individual citizen and our local and state governments and this is really everyone's fault. The finger can't be pointed in any particular direction because it is up to the state as a whole to make and enforce the laws and it is up to us a individuals to make sure we're being pro-active and participating in our local government in some meaningful purpose. Illinois has just taken an initiative that other states can even follow upon as well because this nation as a whole should be on the same page with many laws similar to this one because we as a nation should set an example of being one great community. As a nation our goals should be well-defined and they should be solely for the improved well-being of us all.

Related News Links:
www.wqad.com
www.wired.com

[edit on 12/19/2004 by Mr Knowledge]

[edit on 12/19/2004 by Mr Knowledge]

[edit on 12/19/2004 by Mr Knowledge]

[edit on 12/19/2004 by Mr Knowledge]

[edit on 12-20-2004 by Zion Mainframe]




posted on Dec, 20 2004 @ 07:45 PM
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Look at the box. Video games, like movies, are rated. Would his mother go out and buy an R rated movie for her kids? Probably not without investigating.

www.esrb.org...

I'm assuming San Andreas is MA17. In my area (which i thought was the same around the country) you have to be 17 to purchase it. The computer will prompt the cashier asking for age verification. This is nothing new.

Indeed it is rated MA17. You can go to esrb.org and search for a game. It will give its rating and the reason

"Blood and Gore,Intense Violence,Strong Language,Strong Sexual Content,Use of Drugs
"

But again, look at the box





posted on Dec, 20 2004 @ 07:50 PM
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As Thatoneguy says video games have a big CERTIFICATE on the front rating the game, just like movies do. It should come as no surprise to a parent then that these games contain adult material...hence the certificate.



posted on Dec, 20 2004 @ 08:04 PM
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"He just wrote it on his Christmas list," she said. "I looked at it, and it looked okay, so I bought it."


Thats the whole problem in a nice neat nutshell, parents not actually taking any initiative, thus we have people like this dude doing the work that parents should be doing. Or better yet we should actually crack down on the morons who sell the games without checking ID.



posted on Dec, 20 2004 @ 08:13 PM
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Video games have a better rating system then even movies. It contains more then just a letter like PG or R they go into depth on what type of content is found in the game.

Even big anti-violent video game people like Joe Lieberman have praised the video game rating system as one of the best.

Video games are not just for kids anymore the average age of a video game player is like 23 now. People in the older generations like this governor have yet to understand this fact.



posted on Dec, 20 2004 @ 08:17 PM
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the bottom line: it is a parents responsibilty to MONITOR what their children are playing,seeing,listening to. no if and or buts. i am a parent and if my neighboor allows their children to view violent material...well my kids can't go over there. the gov't,in my opinion is TOO involved in our private lives. let parents raise their children in the manner they see fit. if a parent raises their child differently than mine,it is of no consequence to me,but i satnd on my opinion that the gov't should mostly stay out of it. the NO SELL to UNDER 18 is a good law....but some parents will go ahead and buy it for their kids and that is their business.



posted on Dec, 20 2004 @ 08:30 PM
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Doesn't matter what the box says buddy. It's what the government says.....now. Now we all understand why the governor has done what he has done. Parents are not taking responsibility for their children and monitoring what they watch or play anymore. I believe the govenor felt compelled to do something because from his point of view the gaming industry in spite of the rating system was getting overwhelmingly out of control.

[edit on 12/19/2004 by Mr Knowledge]



posted on Dec, 20 2004 @ 08:44 PM
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i don't agree. my belief is that if the gov't would back off,people would take more responsibilty for their kids.



posted on Dec, 28 2004 @ 10:30 AM
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I have no problem with age verification. Im 20 years old so I can get whatever game money allows


I thought this was already a law, it must be in my state. I remember trying to buy Diablo II when I was 16. The cashier was prompted to check my ID in which you have to be 17 to buy it. So I was sent away with the $60 that I carried in.



posted on Dec, 28 2004 @ 10:39 AM
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I don't think we should treat games like alcohol. If a kid really wants to a buy a "MATURE" video game I think he could find a way. Lots of kids have siblings or parents who could buy the video games for them. There is no reason to "card" anyone who wants to buy a video game. These days, kids have been exposed to much that these video games are harmless. It will only be a nouisance in the way of business for the gaming companies, the stores, and the customers who wish to buy them.



posted on Dec, 28 2004 @ 04:00 PM
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kids will seek out "forbidden" material. i know i did. it is the responsibility of the parent to provide knowledege to their children. when i was 16 i was into gansta rap and my mother explained that she was fine with that but i needed to understand that it was an art form. this was how they expressed their emotions and what they had been through,but i shouln't take it literally. it worked. i listened to it...but i didn't participate in the same things. i enjoyed it for the art. the gov't has no place in parenting. we as parents need to teach our children as i am glad my parents did.



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