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Why Is Dad So Mad?

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posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 11:38 PM
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A 16 year Veteran was having a hard time explaining what PTSD was to his daughter, so he wrote her a book, "Why Is Dad So Mad?"




He had problems with anger, and with his memory. But he had trouble explaining PTSD to is children, and found that there weren’t many resources to help. So he decided to do it himself, and wrote a book for children so they could understand PTSD.

“Why Is Dad So Mad?” is a story about a family of lions, told from the point of view of the mother and children. The father is a service member who has PTSD, and the book explains the symptoms that many who suffer it face — sleeplessness, anger, forgetfulness, nightmares. The book describes it as a fire inside of Dad’s chest, but that no matter how mad or sad he may seem, the love for his family is always there.

“Why Is Dad So Mad?” is available now at Kastle Books, and already, Kastle and his team are working on a companion book for moms, called “Why Is Mom So Mad?”. The site also features resources for veterans who need help with PTSD.


I think this is absolutely wonderful for kids! If this helps them to understand what is going on with their parents returning from these wars, I'm all for it. I just ordered the Kindle version. I think libraries and maybe psychologist offices should carry this book. Most especially if it helps kids! Though I would like to hope, somewhere down the line, someone does a trauma based version, not just a military version, because not all PTSD is military based, but I understand why this particular book is military based and have no issue with it.

Who knows, maybe tomorrow when I'm more awake, I can do a search and see if there is a children's book that is about PTSD that is trauma based. I would definitely have to be more awake for it though. If there are any veterans in here that decide to order the book for their families, I hope it is able to help you!




posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 11:41 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 11:45 PM
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originally posted by: Lazzzarus22
Why Is Dad So Mad?
[snip]



Not all of them. Yes, some did but not all.
edit on 4-4-2015 by elevatedone because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 11:58 PM
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Good to see someone wrote a book to better explain the ptsd soldiers live with .. its often been swept under the carpet and not talked about ...

Over the years learned to live with my ptsd from four tours in vietnam with s.o.g back in the 60's .. even so theres still days it takes a few more drinks and additional pack of cigarettes to deal with it ... works far better than any damn drugs and without the adverse side effects of the damn drugs big pharma pushes ..



posted on Apr, 5 2015 @ 12:00 AM
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originally posted by: Expat888
Good to see someone wrote a book to better explain the ptsd soldiers live with .. its often been swept under the carpet and not talked about ...

Over the years learned to live with my ptsd from four tours in vietnam with s.o.g back in the 60's .. even so theres still days it takes a few more drinks and additional pack of cigarettes to deal with it ... works far better than any damn drugs and without the adverse side effects of the damn drugs big pharma pushes ..


I have it as well. It's a heck of a thing to live with. And sometimes can be very hard to explain to others.



posted on Apr, 5 2015 @ 12:01 AM
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That looks like it would be helpful, for kids and dads alike.


I'm commenting mainly because your thread made me realize I may have PTSD to a degree. I never really thought about it before now in that light.

11 years ago, 2 weeks before my son was born I watched as 4 of my coworkers were killed, and four more were seriously hurt. A year later another was killed. My wife told me for quite some time after that, that I was different. I was quick to anger, meaner. She said I didn't treat my son the same as I treated our daughter who was born 5 years earlier.

I allways just kind of blew it off, over time I think I got over it, but sometimes I still get sad when I think of them. It's allways there. Inside of me. I love my kids and wife and learned soon after to keep control of my emotions, but maybe if I sought some kind of help maybe things would be better.

I know what I experienced wasn't the same as combat, but it sucked, and I never really thought about attributing my reaction to being PTSD until this thread. Wow, sorry to vent, but it feels kinda good.

Makes me really feel for the men and women coming back from war, what a horribly crappy thing we as a people are doing to them.



posted on Apr, 5 2015 @ 06:59 AM
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a reply to: Anyafaj

Dad is mad because he is a victim of US foreign policy

Dad also killed innocent people defending their homes

He killed them for Rothschild bankers



posted on Apr, 5 2015 @ 07:10 AM
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a reply to: caterpillage

Hey even mothers suffer from PTSD in one form or another just after giving birth and into the first few months or so of the babies life. It's good to be able to see it in yourself, huge step in moving forward I'd imagine. Not being a female or experiencing war makes me an outsider of course. Best health to you!



posted on Apr, 5 2015 @ 07:14 AM
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originally posted by: WineAndCheese9
a reply to: Anyafaj

Dad is mad because he is a victim of US foreign policy

Dad also killed innocent people defending their homes

He killed them for Rothschild bankers


Ok ass, than pretend he is a Russian defending his home from evil Rothchilds. Due to the war stress, the Russian Beaver takes his frustrations out on his kids. He says "nyet" I will write a book explaining that I love my kids but the stress from fighting evil Americans has made me this way.



posted on Apr, 5 2015 @ 07:17 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Apr, 5 2015 @ 07:18 AM
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originally posted by: WineAndCheese9
POST REMOVED BY STAFF


Do you even know what PTSD is?
edit on Sun Apr 5 2015 by DontTreadOnMe because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2015 @ 07:37 AM
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a reply to: Rosinitiate

Listen

I don't know if US MREs have bunch of hidden drugs in them

I don't know if cocktail of drugs army doctors prescribe to US army contributes

I don't know if the problem is lack of proper mental training or wrong type of brainwashing altogether

But I do know that a soldier who is not ashamed of what he did in war, a soldier who killed who he had to protect his homeland

Has no mental problem after the war and has no problem talking about what he did and bravery and courage it took to do it

There, eat them apples
edit on 5-4-2015 by WineAndCheese9 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2015 @ 07:55 AM
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originally posted by: WineAndCheese9
a reply to: Rosinitiate

Listen

I don't know if US MREs have bunch of hidden drugs in them

I don't know if cocktail of drugs army doctors prescribe to US army contributes

I don't know if the problem is lack of proper mental training or wrong type of brainwashing altogether

But I do know that a soldier who is not ashamed of what he did in war, a soldier who killed who he had to protect his homeland

Has no mental problem after the war and has no problem talking about what he did and bravery and courage it took to do it

There, eat them apples


So no, you don't have the faintest clue, ok. And no I won't eat apples, everyone knows the FDA poisons them and you wake up in FEMA camps.



posted on Apr, 5 2015 @ 08:58 AM
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originally posted by: WineAndCheese9
a reply to: Rosinitiate

Listen

I don't know if US MREs have bunch of hidden drugs in them

I don't know if cocktail of drugs army doctors prescribe to US army contributes

I don't know if the problem is lack of proper mental training or wrong type of brainwashing altogether

But I do know that a soldier who is not ashamed of what he did in war, a soldier who killed who he had to protect his homeland

Has no mental problem after the war and has no problem talking about what he did and bravery and courage it took to do it

There, eat them apples


Wrong ... I know many in several countries who fought in different sides in wars .. they all suffer ptsd in varying degrees .. its not just an american problem .. war changes and scars people for life .. there are no damn winners in wars and nobody survives war without being scarred for life ..
Oddly enough one of the people I drink with at times when downriver was a captain with the n.v.a during the war .. he also has ptsd .. even though we fought on different sides during the war we have some interesting discussions over drinks these days .. even got invited to his daughters wedding a few years ago ..
You obviously have never been in the military much less in a combat zone to be spouting that bull# that it doesnt affect / change people .. many choose not to talk about it because theres no way someone who hasnt lived through it can comprehend the horror of war ...



posted on Apr, 5 2015 @ 09:23 AM
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Allow me to propose plan B- for your first 4 years in the military it should be assumed that you are too stupid to procreate- my drill instructor seemed pretty certain this was a fact despite it not being official policy, and spoke about it at length on many occasions, often naming specific recruits who proved his point.

Then the book can be, "Dad is still fairly mad for a guy who has had a few years to recover, but he's not really that scary".



posted on Apr, 5 2015 @ 10:16 AM
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originally posted by: WineAndCheese9
a reply to: Rosinitiate

Listen

I don't know if US MREs have bunch of hidden drugs in them

I don't know if cocktail of drugs army doctors prescribe to US army contributes

I don't know if the problem is lack of proper mental training or wrong type of brainwashing altogether

But I do know that a soldier who is not ashamed of what he did in war, a soldier who killed who he had to protect his homeland

Has no mental problem after the war and has no problem talking about what he did and bravery and courage it took to do it

There, eat them apples


shamlessness is a indicator that the programming has set well. Congratulations. Will you now be turning your attention to the police academy?

This Easter message may help you if any symptoms of shame should surface.


edit on 5-4-2015 by InverseLookingGlass because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2015 @ 10:50 AM
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a reply to: WineAndCheese9

I had an uncle who fought on the same side as your favorite country in a war long ago. He obviously did not receive his purple heart for doing anything shameful to anyone else, but he still didn't want to talk about it. He said he got it because the Japanese hurt his feelings.

I'm not a huge fan of the military these days, and not particularly sympathetic to unnecessary voluntary sacrifices solicited from ordinary people by powerful ones in a manner reminiscent of televangelism - my minor military misadventures were my own karma, as any good Marine would relish the chance to tell me in a colorful manner- and I tend to think the same back at them.
But even to my somewhat unfair mindset, your take on post traumatic stress reeks of idealistic naiveté at best and quite possibly purposeful self-delusion in defense of ideology... Not to mention victim blaming- Because let's face it, however large a soldiers role in choosing his fate, very rare is the man who would end up half way around the world killing strangers until they kill him on his own initiative- almost nobody without millions of dollars can get other people to do that- so obviously there's more at work here than just people who are bad in their own right being punished for their wickedness.



posted on Apr, 5 2015 @ 12:16 PM
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originally posted by: caterpillage
That looks like it would be helpful, for kids and dads alike.


I'm commenting mainly because your thread made me realize I may have PTSD to a degree. I never really thought about it before now in that light.

11 years ago, 2 weeks before my son was born I watched as 4 of my coworkers were killed, and four more were seriously hurt. A year later another was killed. My wife told me for quite some time after that, that I was different. I was quick to anger, meaner. She said I didn't treat my son the same as I treated our daughter who was born 5 years earlier.

I allways just kind of blew it off, over time I think I got over it, but sometimes I still get sad when I think of them. It's allways there. Inside of me. I love my kids and wife and learned soon after to keep control of my emotions, but maybe if I sought some kind of help maybe things would be better.

I know what I experienced wasn't the same as combat, but it sucked, and I never really thought about attributing my reaction to being PTSD until this thread. Wow, sorry to vent, but it feels kinda good.

Makes me really feel for the men and women coming back from war, what a horribly crappy thing we as a people are doing to them.



A lot of people think PTSD only happens if you go to war. Any kind of trauma can bring on PTSD. Including the kind you witnessed. A good therapist DOES help. It did me. You don't have to go, but do think about it.




posted on Apr, 6 2015 @ 12:38 PM
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What a great idea
I myself had considered a children's book something more along the lines of he little nut that could, how a young nut gets put in a machine and works really really hard and is proud of it ....short story shorter discovers he works in a machine that makes bombs

I myself have PTSD which has recently gotten worse due to a less than honourable hierarchy which resulted in a homicidal ideation and a desire to take "justice" out to the world and get the ones that are considered above the law
You know whom I mean
With my skills training ptsd and my out of control over indoctrinated desire and belif that good beats evil......I'm gonna be a pain in the ass

I'm still in at the moment......been off sick for 9 months now
Seeing psychologist and psychiatrist, and a forensic psychologist

I started going wobble in 2008
Flared up massively 2011
And went postal 2014

And to be perfectly honest ATS was a great place to come to help put dots and the picture together
HOWEVER war was declared on conspiracy websites in 2013
And since then I have seen a decline in quality topics
Decline in objective thought
But to balance out we've seen an increase in
Blatant shills and trolls
Intolerance of others views
And censorship when someone's post is contrary or explained as you would a child and is in contrast to a mods post a especially

Hey this is my second account...got banned a few months ago for ^ very thing
But hey .......I'm a crazy hy , I don't deny it



posted on Apr, 6 2015 @ 12:44 PM
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Sounds like a great thing for military families.
Kudos to the thoughtful father who wrote it.
Now if they could just find a way to ease the minds of veterans over knowing they were lied to by their own government.
That has to be one hard thing to live with even if you never killed anyone or came back injured.




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