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How Many People Will Have To Migrate Out Of California When All The Water Disappears?

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posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 12:12 PM
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Well ATS, So how many Californians are coming to a town near you? I knew about the drought, but this is getting pretty heavy (Hyperbole maybe)? So, California has over ten percent of the total US Population (about 38 Million). Where are we going to put all these people? The need Housing, Jobs, Food etc. It just seems to me a rather extreme move to start a migration of people while there are other alternatives such as desalinization etc.

So, what Y"all think? Should we maybe start thinking of what it's gonna be like when we end up having A Mass Migration due to the drying up of The Southwest? Or, is this just a Load of Old Bull Puckie?

Any Comments, Rants, Raves or just Plain Common Sense you'd like to add are always most welcome. Thanks Guys and Gals for taking a read of this and Peace
Arjunanda.

(ARTICLE)
The drought in California is getting a lot worse. As you read this, snowpack levels in the Sierra Nevada mountains are the lowest that have ever been recorded. That means that there won’t be much water for California farmers and California cities once again this year. To make up the difference in recent years, water has been pumped out of the ground like crazy. In fact, California has been losing more than 12 million acre-feet of groundwater a year since 2011, and wells all over the state are going dry. Once the groundwater is all gone, what are people going to do?



100 years ago, the population of the state of California was 3 million, and during the 20th century we built lots of beautiful new cities in an area that was previously a desert. Scientists tell us that the 20th century was the wettest century in 1000 years for that area of the country, but now weather patterns are reverting back to normal. Today, the state of California is turning back into a desert but it now has a population of 38 million people. This is not sustainable in the long-term. So when the water runs out, where are they going to go?

I have written quite a few articles about the horrific drought in California, but conditions just continue to get even worse. According to NPR, snowpack levels in the Sierra Nevada mountains are “just 6 percent of the long-term average”…

The water outlook in drought-racked California just got a lot worse: Snowpack levels across the entire Sierra Nevada are now the lowest in recorded history — just 6 percent of the long-term average. That shatters the previous low record on this date of 25 percent, set in 1977 and again last year.
California farmers rely on that water. Last year, farmers had to let hundreds of thousands of acres lie fallow because of the scarcity of water, and it is being projected that this year will be even worse…

More than 400,000 acres of farmland were fallowed last year because of scarce water. Credible sources have estimated that figure could double this year.
Fortunately, many farmers have been able to rely on groundwater in recent years, but now wells are running dry all over the state. Here is more from NPR…

Last year was already a tough year at La Jolla Farming in Delano, Calif. Or as farm manager Jerry Schlitz puts it, “Last year was damn near a disaster.”

La Jolla is a vineyard, a thousand-or-so acres of neat lines of grapevines in the southern end of the San Joaquin Valley. It depends on water from two sources: the federal Central Valley Project and wells.

Until last year, Schlitz says, wells were used to supplement the federal water.

“Now, we have nothing but wells. Nothing. There’s no water other than what’s coming out of the ground,” he says.

Last year, one of those wells at La Jolla dried up. The farm lost 160 acres — about a million dollars’ worth of produce, plus the wasted labor and other resources.
Are you starting to understand the scope of the problem?

Despite all of the wonderful technology that we have developed, we are still at the mercy of the weather.

And if this drought continues to drag on, it is absolutely going to cripple a state that contains more than 10 percent of the total U.S. population.

In an attempt to fight the water shortage, Governor Jerry Brown has instituted statewide water restrictions for the first time ever…

California announced sweeping statewide water restrictions for the first time in history Wednesday in order to combat the region’s devastating drought, the worst since records began.

Governor Jerry Brown issued the declaration at a press conference in a parched, brown slope of the Sierra Nevada mountains that would normally be covered by deep snow.

“Today, we are standing on dry grass where there should be five feet (1.5 meters) of snow,” Brown said. “This historic drought demands unprecedented action.”
So what will these restrictions include?

The following is a summary from Natural News…

A ban on non-drip irrigation systems for all new homes.
A requirement for golf courses and cemeteries to “reduce water consumption.” (And yet, the very idea of green golf courses in the middle of a California desert is insane to begin with…)
Force farmers to report more details on their water usage so that the state government can figure out where all the water is going (and where to restrict it even further).
Outlawing the watering of grass on public street medians.
Discussions are also under way to throw “water wasters” in jail for up to 30 days, according to another LA Times article. The most likely source of intel for incarcerating water wasters will be neighborhood snitches who monitor water usage of nearby homes and call the authorities if they see too much water being used.
If the drought does not go on for much longer, these restrictions may be enough.

But what if it continues to intensify?

The following graphic shows the U.S. Drought Monitor map for the state of California for each of the last five years in late March…


www.zerohedge.com..." target="_blank" class="postlink">www.zerohedge.c... om/news/2015-04-03/how-many-people-will-have-migrate-out-california-when-all-water-disappears



+2 more 
posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 12:20 PM
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a reply to: arjunanda

More than one will be too many.
We don't need people that have that mindset infecting other states.


+8 more 
posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 12:22 PM
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a reply to: arjunanda

Everyone that pushed for the High Speed rail rather than finishing the desalination plants in Santa Barbara should be shot...

After that we can identify who should have to leave.




posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 12:33 PM
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originally posted by: BestinShow
a reply to: arjunanda

Everyone that pushed for the High Speed rail rather than finishing the desalination plants in Santa Barbara should be shot...

After that we can identify who should have to leave.



As Ron White said:

"Stupid is fo-eva! There's not a class or pill you can take..."



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 12:39 PM
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Doesn't take a drought - just a good earthquake to get people moving out of Calfornia. We're do for a good one any day.



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 12:41 PM
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Yep BlackboxInquiry, Stupid just like crazy are the two gifts that just keep on giving. Good Reply
Arjuanda. a reply to: BlackboxInquiry



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: BlackboxInquiry

blackbox, I love that quote!!!! yeah this drought is bad for sure.



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 12:53 PM
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Well, for one, I can't see why anyone will migrate due to drought. They'll likely just keep taking all the freshwater from Canada... And more. Engineering had come quite far in terms of how to keep the water flowing.

I do find it interesting however, that the public has to keep a tight lid on their water use, but oil and fracking companies are exempt from the new water use restrictions.

Go figure.



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 12:55 PM
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a reply to: arjunanda

I think many may be planning to move to Oregon and Washington states...the job markets are good right now and those states have water!



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 12:59 PM
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I wonder if this has anything to do with the "Jade Helm" schtick thats being planned. I don't think there is a realistic contingency available, many people will be seriously screwed, the ones who can move are pretty lucky, there will be many who wont be able to leave...what will home owners do when they cant sell their homes? Will the tax payers pay to relocate these people? What jobs will they get?

Who will grow the veggies the world eats? The rest of the country is in corn and soybeans....I dont think ANYONE is really considering just how far reaching and absolutely frightening this situation really is...Food prices for EVERYONE will be through the roof, trucking, shipping, packing, farm hands I mean this thing is so HUGE in its effects.



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 01:08 PM
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a reply to: caladonea

I lived in Oregon a long time. Im afraid there is no industry to support 30+ million, even in the best of times Oregon has horrible employment. Most of the new employment is built around Restaurants, beer etc... Only certain areas of Oregon are water rich, they have tremendous forest fires every year due to a lack of water...I dont believe Washington and Oregon will suffice the needs of the many people this will effect. I do believe people will do as you say, but it wont be a viable answer.



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 01:20 PM
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a reply to: arjunanda

So now we will have fellow Americans as the immigrants pouring over State lines to find a better life?

Interesting.

So when the States they run to start to see a drain on their economy, resources etc, will we see people in the streets calling for the deportation of fellow legal Americans?

Fight amongst each other while TPTB get stronger. Meanwhile, ask Nestle if they give a crap.

JUDE11



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 01:23 PM
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None if they restrict water to oil and fossel fuel companies too and start making desalinization plants.



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 01:27 PM
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a reply to: jude11

Immigrants will be fighting other immigrants for the same jobs, we are in a serious pickle, and the rest of the country will suffer food shortages, price increases etc...Our GDP will fall tremendously as a nation effecting pour budgets ...I see no good in this at all...Nestle needs to go back to Switzerland and tap their own water to filter and sell to folks...



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 01:33 PM
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a reply to: amazing

I think we have a lot more to study and consider before we go messing with Desalinization on a scale that large.




Modern reverse-osmosis desalination plants, such as those planned or proposed on the California coast, take in large volumes of seawater – generally two gallons are withdrawn for every gallon of freshwater produced – and pass it through fine-pored membranes to separate freshwater from salt. The highly concentrated brine is then typically disposed of back into the ocean


What are we going to do with the brine?
Not too mention what will this do to the ecology, especially on the scale we would need to embark on.



With the majority of desalination plants extracting water directly through open water intakes in the ocean, there is a direct impact on marine life. Fish and other marine organisms are killed on the intake screens (impingement); organisms small enough to pass through, such as plankton, fish eggs, and larvae, are killed during processing of the salt water (entrainment). The impacts on the marine environment, even for a single desalination plant, may be subject to daily, seasonal, annual, and even decadal variation, and are likely to be species- and site-specific.


I don't know, I think that desalinization as nice as it sounds is a can of worms



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 01:34 PM
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a reply to: arjunanda

I predict that water will have to be imported from other states. California should invest about 10 billion dollars into water desalinization plants, since it is right on the coast of the USA. They could even do solar desalinization, and become a HUGE sea salt exporter. The sea salt and other minerals like gold harvested from the water would offset the costs of bringing desalinization to California. I think they should pump as much water as they can from the ocean and set up a giant desalinization farm where the Salton Sea has dried up. Those would be dollars well spent. Will the powers that be "wise up" and do whats right? I have my doubts.



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 01:50 PM
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Texta reply to: arjunanda

So now we will have fellow Americans as the immigrants pouring over State lines to find a better life?

Interesting.

So when the States they run to start to see a drain on their economy, resources etc, will we see people in the streets calling for the deportation of fellow legal Americans?

Fight amongst each other while TPTB get stronger. Meanwhile, ask Nestle if they give a crap.

JUDE11
a reply to: jude11
So Jude11, Someone let you in on The Game Plan. OK, You Do Actually Get It! Great Reply
Arjunanda.
Second



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 02:05 PM
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a reply to: arjunanda

When water gets scarce enough, the cost of desalination plants will make sense. Look at the Arab Emirates. There are huge cities with very little fresh water. In Israel, water restrictions are super tight.

If these places can do it, so will California. They will just have super tight water restrictions.
edit on 4-4-2015 by pirhanna because: (no reason given)


+4 more 
posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 02:15 PM
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They won't be able to go to Mexico, because Mexico does not allow illegal immigration. They enforce their immigration laws.



posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 02:17 PM
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originally posted by: BlueJacket
a reply to: caladonea

I lived in Oregon a long time. Im afraid there is no industry to support 30+ million, even in the best of times Oregon has horrible employment. Most of the new employment is built around Restaurants, beer etc... Only certain areas of Oregon are water rich, they have tremendous forest fires every year due to a lack of water...I dont believe Washington and Oregon will suffice the needs of the many people this will effect. I do believe people will do as you say, but it wont be a viable answer.


I agree there. Washington, Oregon and Idaho are experiencing droughts too, as by state Governor warnings. They are coming up with solutions ASAP at least but it's in due time for some areas that will be just as bad as California is said to be gong into.



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