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Where do hammers come from?

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posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 07:49 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

I saw this vid a while ago and remembered someone here was a locksmith but not who it was, Have you ever seen one of these before?

I thought it was pretty nifty.





posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 07:57 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific

I have not come across that type of lock yet.

You often find that lock type popularity goes by region, so Spain and Britain have different preferences, as do Germany and France. I would have thought that I would have to be very lucky indeed to come across a padlock like that here in the UK!

It looks like a cool gadget, that's for sure! Very innovative design! Of course, I would have thought that there are techniques that could be applied to bypass the lock entirely, simply because there always are!



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 08:21 AM
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calm down fellas, I knew it would happen, first hammers, now shiny sexy locks. Tool pawn anyone?



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 08:25 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific

Clearly, they murder people and simply find their way back into their own universe of anonymous utility around the globe to kill again without detection, warning or remorse.

FBI: MORE PEOPLE KILLED WITH FISTS AND HAMMERS THAN WITH RIFLES AND SHOTGUNS



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 08:50 AM
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They come from the magical land of Hamm. Little elves spirit them into people's homes so that they wonder where they came from. I see it worked.

Actually, I bought mine at a hardware store. It's a cool place. All kinds of stuff there. It's like playland for serial killers. Good thing I'm not a serial killer.



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 09:13 AM
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originally posted by: sussy
calm down fellas, I knew it would happen, first hammers, now shiny sexy locks. Tool pawn anyone?


Nothing wrong with a bit of tool porn!

I am much more likley to be caught reading a machine mart catolouge than an issue of razzle.



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 09:25 AM
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I can't believe I spelt porn wrong lololol I must google it more often



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 09:51 AM
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originally posted by: sussy
I can't believe I spelt porn wrong lololol I must google it more often


You can spell it wrong in google and still get to where you want to go.


Jude11



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 10:32 AM
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a reply to: Kandinsky Estwing hammer are nice. But the handle is too small for my big hands. I opted for a Plumb hammer. They are made by Cooper Tools.




edit on 4 3 2015 by Ceeker63 because: misspelled word



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: Ceeker63

It's the straight claw, small head and great balance that makes me love the Estwing.

Just been looking at the Plumb hammers, I can see what you mean about wider handles and they look a bit bulkier than estwings. Some of them have that straight claw too. Gotta laugh at the magnetic one though! It'd be a total nightmare on sites. Great for hanging pictures and shelves...not so good on a working scaffold or in the back of the van.

My dad is a self-employed builder and all this hammer talk has identified his next birthday/Father's Day present. A leather-handled, 24oz Estwing that I could put in a (jokey) wooden case. He's a tough customer for presents and this one is good and tongue-in-cheek too!



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 11:27 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific



First one to say aliens wins a prize.


It was aliens-I'll take my cash prize now.

If I was to hazard a guess Ball Peen Hammers were probably developed by smiths to shape soft metals, but that's just a guess and I'm guessing the claw was implemented after that. There is probably an hammer Museum somewhere in the world with an 80 year old custodian that could regale you with the history of the hammer, but I've yet to hear of such a place.


edit on 3-4-2015 by Thecakeisalie because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 12:55 PM
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Ive seen an alien with a head that looks like a bit of a hammer, on tv

Own heaps of hammers, but only bought a couple.

Interesting thread, its true and I never thought about it before.


edit on b2015Fri, 03 Apr 2015 12:56:35 -050043020155pm302015-04-03T12:56:35-05:00 by borntowatch because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 02:18 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific
That's a fascinating question. I have numerous hammers but can only recall one that I actually directly bought. By "directly", I mean I went into a hardware shop and bought it. A huge great sledgehammer.

I don't have any huge great sledges but if one ever happens along, I'll be ready.

As for all my other hammers, they are all something like cats, I suppose. They just found a home with me, but where they came from is mostly enshrouded in mystery.

However, there is an exception. Some years ago I bought a second-hand car and it came complete with an excellent set of tools in a sturdy tool box, one of those that folds out in three levels. The old lady who owned the car didn't need the tools because only her late husband used them to work on the car. When he was alive, I mean.

That car has long since been recycled into dish washers (it already sounded much like one when I had it) but I still have the tool box and all those tools.



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 02:25 PM
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a reply to: Thecakeisalie
This:

There is probably an hammer Museum somewhere in the world with an 80 year old custodian that could regale you with the history of the hammer, but I've yet to hear of such a place.


Well, there is a Hammer Museum in Haines, Alaska.
The Hammer Museum

The Hammer Museum is the world’s first museum dedicated to preserving the history of man's first tool, the hammer.


Don't know if the curator is eighty years old, but it still sounds fascinating.



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 02:27 PM
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a reply to: JustMike

I have never owned a sledge hammer but once borrowed on from an elderly neighbour, He brought it round for me to know down a small brick wall.

I swear that 3 swings in the handle snapped and the head fell off.

He looked at me in complete shock and said " I've owned that for over 40 years and used it hundreds of times, you've had it 30 seconds and its broken. It's no wonder the whole world has gone to pot with you youngsters(I was in my mid 30's) running the show"

I offered to repair it but he just said no and walked off saying that he did not understand the world anymore.



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 02:39 PM
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I've got the same problem with my fishing gear.

Three tackle boxes full of lures and various tools of the trade, 6 different kinds of fishing rods, 2 fishing nets, an ice auger, and 3 pairs of hip waders.

... and I don't recall ever stepping foot into a single fishing tackle shop - ever.


edit on 3-4-2015 by CranialSponge because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 02:59 PM
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I would have thought that a Brit would know that Hammers come from Upton Park:

en.wikipedia.org...

Bwahahahaha......



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 02:59 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific
That's one of the odd things with certain old tools, especially things like big hammers and pick axes!


People develop their own way of swinging the things and it can vary quite a bit. That man could have swung that hammer in a certain way and never hit anything solid enough at exactly the right angle and with enough force to find a possible weak spot and fracture the handle. But if you have a different swing (and are maybe also stronger, being such a youngster
), then you can break it.

The second factor is if it had been sitting for a long time. The wood can dry out far too much and that makes it easier to break. It's not a bad idea to soak old wooden-handled hammers and axes in linseed oil once a year or so. (Just the head end.) Keeps the wood in better shape. Ditto if you fit a new handle. After you've put in the wedges give it an overnight soaking in the oil.

ETA: however, none of the above explains where all these hammers really come from!


edit on 3/4/15 by JustMike because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 03:57 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific

Since you asked, and I'm a smart ass, I found something for you.

How hammers are made:



Okay, okay, here's something to make up for me being a smart ass.


edit on 3-4-2015 by Skid Mark because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 04:11 PM
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a reply to: Skid Mark

I can not watch the how its made vid as if I start I will not stop, I used to be a how it's made addict.

I will however watch the beatles vid as it's a good tune!



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