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5 Charts Which Show That The Next Economic Crash Is Dead Ahead

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posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 10:17 AM
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This article discusses events like the drastic drop in oil prices, and the fracking boom and bust, and describes why it looks like the next financial crisis is overdue and will be knocking at our doorsteps in no time. P.S. sorry I didn't include the charts themselves, they can be found in the article. I have trouble with downloading/copying/posting images for some reason.

Oil Drop:



For example, let’s talk about the price of oil. There are only two times in history when the price of oil has fallen by more than 50 dollars in a six month time period. One was just before the financial crisis in 2008, and the other has just happened…


Fracking bust:



We are looking at a full-blown fracking bust, and this bust is already having a dramatic impact on the economies of states that are heavily dependent on the energy industry. In recent years, Wall Street banks have made a massive amount of money packaging up energy industry loans, bonds, etc. and selling them off to investors. If that sounds similar to the kind of behavior that preceded the subprime mortgage meltdown, that is because it is.


Global trade slowing (December to January was the biggest drop in 4 years):



At the same time, we are also witnessing a slowdown in global trade. This usually happens when economic conditions are about to turn sour, and that is why it is so alarming that the total volume of global trade in January was down 1.4 percent from December. According to Tyler Durden of Zero Hedge, that was the largest drop since 2011…




...new orders for consumer goods are falling at a rate not seen since the last recession…


The totally legit stock market, and telltale signs on the exchange:



Well, what about the stock market? It was up more than 200 points on Monday. Isn’t that good news? Yes, but the euphoria on Wall Street will not last for long. When corporate earnings per share either start flattening out or start to decline, that is a huge red flag. We saw this just prior to the stock market crash of 2008, and it is happening again right now.


But some people see what's coming:



According to CNBC, a lot of the “smart money” is pulling their money out of the stock market right now while the getting is good… Recent market volatility has sent stock market investors rushing for the exits and into cash.




It doesn’t matter if you are a millionaire “on paper” today. What matters is if the money is going to be there when you really need it. At the moment, a whole lot of people have been lulled into a false sense of complacency by the soaring stock market and by the bubble of false economic stability that we have been enjoying. But under the surface, there is a whole lot of turmoil going on. Those that are looking for the signs are going to see the next crisis approaching well in advance. Those that are not are going to get absolutely blindsided by what is coming. Don’t let that happen to you.


Economic Collapse Blog - Article

What do you guys think? We've been talking about this for YEARS now but it seems every where we look, more and more signs are presenting themselves.


$

edit on 2-4-2015 by FamCore because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 10:26 AM
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The Stock and Economy is like a HUGE Piggy Bank. When It's Full, TPTB take it away for themselves, This is Called the Stock Market Crash.

When they "FIX" it, TPTB are just replacing the Old Piggy Bank(full) with a New Piggy Bank(empty).

And the Cycles Continues....

Great Find BTW!

Regards,



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 10:29 AM
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a reply to: FamCore

No offense to the OP ;-) Honestly, I am so ef'ing tired of hearing talking heads spin this and that and it just never seems to happen. Everybody should get happy-happy and just chill out. Relax, better still become a Dudiest and abide. Maybe sh*t gonna happen, one way or the other if it does, work it out. If it doesn't, you've saved years on your life by not being stressed, hyper and freaked out. Which actually prepares you better if it does go south. It's all proto-fear, it's there to keep you confused, unfocused and worried so your energies all go in the wrong direction.

“I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.” Frank Herbert from Dune.

Abide

Cheers - Dave



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 10:29 AM
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a reply to: FamCore

I think the oil prices, is the most significant! Oil prices falling and economy failures go hand and hand over the last 50 yrs! I believe we are heading for a 2nd great depression.



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 10:40 AM
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I've been hearing about the coming economic oblivion since about 2009 and it always seemed like it was just around the corner but it never happened it was always "next year it's coming stock up on food now" not saying it won't happen because the capitalist system itself works on boom and bust ,the bust is inevitable but I'm not going to live in fear over it anymore.



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 10:40 AM
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a reply to: bobs_uruncle

None taken, I completely hear what you're saying. It does get annoying when you hear the same financial analysts/economists/journalists saying the same things, over and over again.

But for me personally, it's a matter of what you do with the information (or if you choose to even absorb it or neglect it's presence entirely). I don't get stressed or anxious when I read up on these things - it's just a way for me to get an idea of what's going on.

What's most interesting is watching things change/adjust their values on the global marketplace, while other geopolitical events are taking place (i.e. wars or treaties).

I'm not thoroughly educated on the financial systems or economics, but it does interest me. And when you look at things side by side, and see how world affairs are correlating with economic fluctuations it just paints a clearer picture.



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 10:48 AM
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originally posted by: SirKonstantin



The Stock and Economy is like a HUGE Piggy Bank. When It's Full, TPTB take it away for themselves, This is Called the Stock Market Crash.

When they "FIX" it, TPTB are just replacing the Old Piggy Bank(full) with a New Piggy Bank(empty).

And the Cycles Continues....

Great Find BTW!

Regards,


I love that analogy, very fitting.

Let the fed fiat Ponzi scheme burn then go back to a responsible system. Painful and dangerous for us? For sure.

But I would rather feel the pain than force it on my children and grandchildren.

This video was posted by hounddoghowlie, and it nails the theft of wealth by the fed and private banks



Kill the fed and get creative with the criminals.



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 10:50 AM
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originally posted by: FamCore
Global trade slowing (December to January was the biggest drop in 4 years):


A very large part of that were the west coast port issues which caused ripples throughout the trans-shipment industry. This will not be fully cleared until eh end of this month and you should see a rebound in global container shipments.



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 10:52 AM
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originally posted by: FamCore
a reply to: bobs_uruncle

None taken, I completely hear what you're saying. It does get annoying when you hear the same financial analysts/economists/journalists saying the same things, over and over again.

But for me personally, it's a matter of what you do with the information (or if you choose to even absorb it or neglect it's presence entirely). I don't get stressed or anxious when I read up on these things - it's just a way for me to get an idea of what's going on.

What's most interesting is watching things change/adjust their values on the global marketplace, while other geopolitical events are taking place (i.e. wars or treaties).

I'm not thoroughly educated on the financial systems or economics, but it does interest me. And when you look at things side by side, and see how world affairs are correlating with economic fluctuations it just paints a clearer picture.


Definitely agree with you there, the correlation of events is very interesting. I guess my point, let's do this thing, or not. I am prepared for a collapse, if it doesn't happen, I'll still save money with the preparation I've done and I am pretty relaxed anyway, I don't worry and fret really about anything. Fear and panic are the worst things during a bad situation or leading up to it, people make bad decisions.

Cheers - Dave



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 10:52 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: FamCore
Global trade slowing (December to January was the biggest drop in 4 years):


A very large part of that were the west coast port issues which caused ripples throughout the trans-shipment industry. This will not be fully cleared until eh end of this month and you should see a rebound in global container shipments.


Nice! I hadn't put that connection together but it makes perfect sense, forgot all about the port problems on the West Coast. Thanks for the input AM



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 11:24 AM
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Great.
Not only are we all going to die... We will die poor.



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 11:33 AM
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There were some drastic economic changes made by the US Government that started in the early 80's with other modifications through policy changes up until currently. The economy started its decline in the early 1980's. When will it bottom out, nobody knows. Its not a drastic change to depression like what happened in the late 1920's.

The new economic design is to bring on economic depression slowly, gradually. Then one day it will be realized that the economy can't be manipulated anymore and everyone will realize the economy is in a state of depression.

Fewer and fewer people will be able to get wealthy off the economy.

Just my opinion.
edit on 2-4-2015 by eManym because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 11:35 AM
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I sold my half of the house to my ex last year. I had paid off some of the mortgage so am left with about 70 grand in the bank. I'm not very knowledgable when it comes to economics, but from my reading and connecting dots, I'm inclined to agree that a crash is inevitable. My initial intent was on buying another (smaller) house, but I'm wondering if it might not be better to hold onto the cash and buy something after the crash. Does anyone have any recommendations? Thanks!

soulwaxer



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 11:39 AM
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a reply to: soulwaxer

Probably best to check with a reputable financial adviser. Not one that only wants to generate commissions off your assets.



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 12:12 PM
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a reply to: eManym

Thanks, I may do that! Though I'm also interested in ATS-member opinions.

I live in Belgium, and between 1990 and 2008, real estate prices just about tripled. Between 2008 and now, they have been stable. I'm wondering what the effect of another crash would be on real estate prices. Also, whether or not it is wise to keep money in the bank with a crash looming. Or maybe investing in a certain currency might be an option?

soulwaxer



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 12:21 PM
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originally posted by: soulwaxer
I sold my half of the house to my ex last year. I had paid off some of the mortgage so am left with about 70 grand in the bank. I'm not very knowledgable when it comes to economics, but from my reading and connecting dots, I'm inclined to agree that a crash is inevitable. My initial intent was on buying another (smaller) house, but I'm wondering if it might not be better to hold onto the cash and buy something after the crash. Does anyone have any recommendations? Thanks!

soulwaxer


Land or a house may be the way to go because the cash may not have much or any value depending on the type and depth of an economic crash.



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 12:22 PM
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a reply to: stosh64

Thanks! & I'll Take a Look at this Video Later @ Home!

Ya, Corruption is a Witch.



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 01:07 PM
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I mean, all projections aside aren't we already IN a depression with little evidence to support the concept that the economy would rebound? It seems as though the current American economy is unsalvageable and in need of a drastic overhaul. I'm not sure what the current *news* is regarding the economy, but I do know that folks in my generation, graduating college during the 2008 collapse, unable to find work to pay off student loans, let alone buy a house. They're calling us the boomerang generation, yet there's no system in place in which to get a foothold. I mean... A retirement fund? Do many even have savings? What about job security? Isn't the social security fund itself in danger of running out of funds? Not to mention they barely provide folks with enough money to live. Many reliant on social security alone get $400 per month, plus maybe another $200 for food, and housing vouchers with 2 year waiting lists to live in a (generally) awful neighborhood.

I believe it'll take a lot of work to fix the situation, but what many took for granted (financial independence if one's willing to work hard enough, a private home of one's own) is simply unobtainable for far too many now.



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 02:57 PM
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originally posted by: hearows
Isn't the social security fund itself in danger of running out of funds?
Due to run out by 2033 www.google.com...

But apparently it will never "dry up", because people are always paying into it (?) but that's probably just an easy way for politicians to keep emptying the pot without getting us future recipients all riled up...

As bad as things may be right now, they will get a LOT (and I mean immeasurably) worse when everyone tries to collect their debts/get rid of their sh*t investments/holdings



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 07:55 PM
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In looking at those charts from the original article, many of those downturns happened after the onset of the Great Recession. So maybe this is an indicator that the next recession is already here, rather than just looming on the horizon.

-dex



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