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Maybe get to Mars in 39 days ?

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posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 10:35 AM
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www.dailymail.co.uk...

According to this article, there are new engines under development which NASA are considering which might cut the travel time down drastically. I am no expert, but how much effect would this have on the crew, if any effect at all. What say you, rocket experts on ATS




posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 10:43 AM
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NASA is always trying to develop newer technology. Since they lost the technology to land on the Moon, if they lied about that so people don't know what they are really doing up there. I think if they do try to go to Mars, it will still have an effect on any Human if you use anything that's not natural to the Human Mind or Body. They could Age faster, depends what energy they use within the Engines or whatever they find to build them, Area 51 could have been helping them out with Alien tech.



posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 10:53 AM
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that will be awesome when we can travel fast between here and there



posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 10:54 AM
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VASIMR is a plasma-based propulsion system. An electric power source is used to ionize fuel into plasma. Electric fields heat and accelerate the plasma while the magnetic fields direct the plasma in the proper direction as it is ejected from the engine, creating thrust for the spacecraft. The engine can even vary the amount of thrust generated, allowing it to increase or decrease its acceleration. It even features an "afterburner" mode that sacrifices fuel efficiency for additional speed. Possible fuels for the VASIMR engine could include hydrogen, helium, and deuterium.

NASA

I hope to see in my lifetime that we are able as a humans to go beyond moon to the end of our solar system and possibly even further. Time is no friend in space travelling.
edit on 1-4-2015 by dollukka because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 11:15 AM
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originally posted by: dollukka



VASIMR is a plasma-based propulsion system. An electric power source is used to ionize fuel into plasma. Electric fields heat and accelerate the plasma while the magnetic fields direct the plasma in the proper direction as it is ejected from the engine, creating thrust for the spacecraft. The engine can even vary the amount of thrust generated, allowing it to increase or decrease its acceleration. It even features an "afterburner" mode that sacrifices fuel efficiency for additional speed. Possible fuels for the VASIMR engine could include hydrogen, helium, and deuterium.

NASA

I hope to see in my lifetime that we are able as a humans to go beyond moon to the end of our solar system and possibly even further. Time is no friend in space travelling.


You know, I must admit I would be happy if we just got to Mars and back in My lifetime !! Imagine the bragging rights of the first Astronaut who did that



posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 11:19 AM
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a reply to: nelloh62

The last I heard NASA had rockets that would take them 6 months to get there.

39 days is a hell of a shortening of time frame.

Pretty exciting stuff.

~Tenth



posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 11:21 AM
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I ended up hating my roomate in the dorms after a semester. I can't imagine how much animosity a Mars crew would have after 6 months inside a tiny space craft.

I can remember feeling intense rage over the smallest things my roommate would do. I SHUT THE BLINDS FOR A REASON!

Just imagine being stuck in pressurized capsule for 6 months together...



posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 11:22 AM
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originally posted by: nelloh62
www.dailymail.co.uk...

According to this article, there are new engines under development which NASA are considering which might cut the travel time down drastically. I am no expert, but how much effect would this have on the crew, if any effect at all. What say you, rocket experts on ATS
nope. all it takes is less than 1 g of acceleration for a few weeks and less than 1 g of deacceleration for a few weeks. in fact it probably actually takes a lot less than one g to meet that deadline. there is no need to experience lethal Gs to get to Mars in even 21 days. it does not take radical G's. but really you'd probably be ok to take a little above a g for an extended time. yeah pilots can survive double digit G's for a minute or two.

But anything over 1 g is very uncomfortable and much over it for an extended time will kill most people. think of how you would feel if you had a backpack on that weighed as much as you do. or you weighed double what you weigh how your heart veins arteries lymph system diaphram and so on would have to work to maintain normal bodily processes.



posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 11:28 AM
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a reply to: nelloh62

The average distance to Mars from Earth is 140,000,000 miles.
Divided by 39 days=3589743 miles/day.
Divided by 24 hours=149,572 miles/hour

Either somebody is wrong with their figuring (me?), or they have a fantastic means of travelling 149,572 miles per hour.
Ain't no rocket going to come close to that. You basically need a massless field/and ion drive.
edit on 1-4-2015 by Aliensun because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 11:29 AM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

Or Mars 1, rest of your life.
Not all of us are suitable for space travelling, that´s why the tests are for.
I did hear that Mars 1 is a scam, lets see how it turns out.



posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 11:30 AM
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a reply to: nelloh62

That was so 60´s, I believe we have grown over this by now.



posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 11:54 AM
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a reply to: Aliensun

Pretty much any rocket could hit that speed, the problem is getting it to space and still having enough fuel to do a transfer burn to mars, and enough fuel left over to stop. Rockets can't do that, but they'd be more than capable of the speed requirements if the energy was there.
edit on 1/4/15 by SpongeBeard because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 11:54 AM
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a reply to: nelloh62

Remember, we've been told anything you and I can think of, the Space Agencies have done already...some back 50 years or so. Considering that alone, Ive always thought we Earthlings can only speculate on what we know and see in our own world-frame of reference.

We seem to think we need to use rockets like a shotgun and fuel and propulsion systems as we know them to get us up and through space....because in fact...historically thats what we use: rockets, fuel, tanks and cells.

Leaving out advanced tech we have on Earth for the sake of this discussion...I believe we either know already or will soon discover other ways of deep space-distance travel. We prob have ways, but the public is a long way off from understanding them. (Again, not to dismiss them, but to accept they are a reality in various completed or in-complete forms...that's a given).

The answer lies in the probability of other forms, means and methods that exist and we arent told...some not yet discovered...to get us across the vastness of space.

I really believe we aren't that far away from "Beam me up Scotty"...if in fact we aren't already doing it.



posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 12:06 PM
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a reply to: mysterioustranger

Well, you never know. What we mere mortals see and learn about is probably only the tip of the iceberg.



posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 01:22 PM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

Yeah, but there are psychological parameters for close quarters existence... you likely didn't have a team of specialists picking your dorm mate.

Besides, being the first ones (maybe) to a new planet provides more incentive for good behavior than a semester of core courses.

But, being humans, there is the chance only one would reach Mars... they would then call it the Mars Highlander effect, heh.



posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 02:47 PM
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a reply to: nelloh62

And THAT my friend....is EXACTLY what I'm saying! I don't remember who said it but it went something like "we have the ability now to take the aliens home and back again". Another was anything we can imagine...we've already done 50 years ago....

If we the people only knew the real story about what's been done already and what's possible....boy oh boy!



posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 02:52 PM
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a reply to: nelloh62

Really, how does nobody but me question this? Not necessarily the timeframe to get to Mars, but the distance aspect of what we have been told forever? If it is true and their distance stats are true, how in the hell minus some kind of faster than light speed travel could we possibly make it to Mars in a little over a month? Once that satellite was launched and made it out of the solar system, this made me question this over and over in my head! Our supposed distances of our own solar system have to be waaaay off for us to be able to achieve this in the time they are saying!

Does this not add up to being completely lied to? Unless they thought this to be true and if so, how isn't everything they have said a lie? Like the size of planets, weights (not to mention how a weight of a planet would be calculated) and much more...This just stinks of being completely lied to about how far away from us things in outer space actually are....



posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 03:40 PM
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originally posted by: Aliensun
Either somebody is wrong with their figuring (me?), or they have a fantastic means of travelling 149,572 miles per hour.
Ain't no rocket going to come close to that. You basically need a massless field/and ion drive.


New Horizons launched with a speed of around 100,000 mph relative to the sun. And that was just a conventional rocket launch. A spacecraft with an engine that allowed constant acceleration should easily be able to exceed that over time.



posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 03:43 PM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

I don't think it would be that difficult. Look at the people doing it in submarines.



posted on Apr, 1 2015 @ 05:23 PM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

I feel your pain regarding the roommate thing and what it would be like to be stuck with people for months or years in a tinsy capsule. One semester in college I repeatedly walked in on my roommate doing things to himself. And he was binge drinker who would polish off a bottle of jack in about 15 minutes and then spew everywhere. I eventually had the RA kick him out of the dorms altogether for obvious reasons.

imagine getting bad luck and a crewmate like that. I know they don't exactly play crewmate roulette but still people can hide aspects of themselves until it's too late. Especially new roommates.







 
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