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Graphene Lightbulb Set For Shops

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posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 03:52 AM
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The very first commercial product using the super material graphene! It's similar to an LED bulb, only better.


It is expected to be priced lower than some LED bulbs, which can cost about £15 each.
Based on traditional light bulb design, the use of graphene allows it to conduct electricity and heat more effectively.
Prof Bailey told the BBC: "The graphene light bulb will use less energy. We expect it to last longer. The manufacturing costs are lower and it uses more and more sustainable components.

www.bbc.com...

This is doubly good news because of how toxic lightbulbs have become, and LED bulbs being too costly. Now we have an even better product, even cheaper!




posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 04:24 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

I will be very interested to see how the performance of this type of illuminating device stacks up, in the real world, as opposed to in laboratory test scenarios, in terms of efficiency, longevity, and so on. It is very neat, and very exciting however, to have graphene technologies coming on stream for use in the home.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 04:30 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Yes, they haven't hit the market yet, but based on the properties of the different materials it will likely outperform standard LED. It being cheaper, and probably becoming much cheaper once the technology is refined, and this could be the next big lightbulb.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 04:40 AM
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This has only really been newsworthy as it' is an application that is cost effective. But at only around 10 greater efficiency, bearing in mind how efficient LEDs are already, it's not a huge story. I think that it'll be a while yet before graphene will be successfully monetized by demonstrating its potential in the market.
edit on 31-3-2015 by Meduzi because: I type like a dolt.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 04:53 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

I hope that this will usher in a whole era of graphene based technologies, and indeed an era in which graphene production becomes so cheap that laypersons can acquire it with the same relative ease that we can purchase sheet steel, for example.

There are many interesting little projects that might benefit from a layer or two, with which one might divert oneself!



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 04:53 AM
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a reply to: Meduzi

It's basically a better version of an already great product, and it's cheaper. Cheaper while being a brand new technology, LED lights have been around a while. It's reasonable to assume in a few years the manufacturing process will have matured and cost per unit will drop even further.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 05:40 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

Yes, and I think that that's the reason that is was considered newsworthy. But I'd be more impressed with a Moore's Law level of progress, than 10% here and there.
edit on 31-3-2015 by Meduzi because: I type like a dolt.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 06:09 AM
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a reply to: Meduzi

Moore's Law could never be applied here. The highest level of efficiency is 100%, that means a bulb with 50% efficiency would double to 100% the next year and we would have a perfect bulb ....

I really think you just don't understand how much 10% is.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 07:10 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

I "get" the numbers...

I am applying the logic of Moore's Law to the improvement i.e by dividing the status quo, etc.

10% of a small amount, is an even smaller amount. I did refer to efficiency, but its conversion to visible light, isn't the only defining factor of a light source. If it were three times more efficient, then it would require a heat-sink, only one third of the size (actually, surface area, conductivity etc are critical factors also, but my point is demonstratively valid). That would open that energy level to applications not currently possible. 10% improvement, isn't likely to cause this variation to become disruptive technology.
edit on 31-3-2015 by Meduzi because: I type like a dolt.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 07:16 AM
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Bucky ball sausage tube technology....


Other potential applications, Real micro fiber thread made from similar applications (Bullet proof T-shirts) Nano-electrical tubing (Near Zero loss due to resistance) etc.


Wow, it's only been about 25+ years since I read in Omni Magazine about this potential.



edit on 31-3-2015 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 07:17 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

The company I work for has already partnered with the institute mentioned in the Original Post, this is considered next-generation LED technology and will continue to make LEDs more approachable for the end user price-wise.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 07:30 AM
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The 'perfect' light source would produce only light, wasting no or very little energy as heat. The old tungsten filament type lamps are terrible energy munchers as they rely on superheating the filament to create light so a comparison of the latest led tech with the graphene lamps will be interesting and the key to which will win the race ultimately.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 08:04 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04




Now we have an even better product, even cheaper!


Sounds good. However, Better and Cheaper don't usually make it down to the consumer.

Depending on the Demand, I wouldn't necessarily hold my breath for cheaper prices on a better product.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 08:42 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

And you wouldn't have to call the hazmat team in when one inadvertently breaks.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 08:46 AM
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originally posted by: Pilgrum
The 'perfect' light source would produce only light, wasting no or very little energy as heat. The old tungsten filament type lamps are terrible energy munchers as they rely on superheating the filament to create light so a comparison of the latest led tech with the graphene lamps will be interesting and the key to which will win the race ultimately.


I suppose the perfect light source would be to pipe sunlight with fiber optic cable from the other side of the globe.

Solar panels could work 24/7 and remain on the surface.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 08:53 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

I want a grapheme flashlight the size of a needle or a small ring (and I want it now).



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 08:57 AM
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Neat idea! We're starting to switch over to LEDs as our CFLs end their lives (most of ours have run for many years, save for a very small percentage that died & needed replaced) At present, we've only needed to replace one in the past year -- the one we put on the porch wasn't pleased with the below zero winter temps and refused to work. Oops, stupid move on our part < blush > The LED bulb is great out there though, a little less wattage, and even more light output (and seems ok with being super cold)

This may help to inadvertently drive down the cost of LEDs, if graphene bulbs prove to be better. Competition & all that jazz.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 09:15 AM
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a reply to: Meduzi

i don't know....10% improvement at a lower cost....

if you convert it to cost/units of energy, that 10% starts to look at least a little better.

If they were able to be used for exterior lighting, municipalities could find leaner operating margins. Along with any other entities that use lots of lighting. Like maybe Wal Mart.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 09:30 AM
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a reply to: Nyiah

Careful them ones can really get hot when they are on their way out, the ballast circuit gets really hot, I got rid of all mine and went for halogens.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 09:38 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

If Moore's Law applies to computers, it just as easily applies to light bulbs.
That is not to say it is perfect, but it gives a nice solid feel in speaking about indefinite things.




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