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Inquiry of Silk Road Website Spurred Agents’ Own Illegal Acts, Officials Say

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posted on Mar, 30 2015 @ 10:10 PM
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While investigating Silk Road, Mr. Force "stole and converted to his own personal use a sizeable amount of Bitcoins, " that was used by buyers and sellers on the website and which he obtained in his undercover capacity, the complaint said.

2 Ex-Federal Agents in Silk Road Case Are Accused of Illicit Activities

Sometimes it is the course of human nature to succumb to an easy temptation. We hold those in a postion of authority to be more responsible in their actions often forgetting that like many have human weaknesses.

The millions of Bitcoins they stole will be a mistake they'll certainly be remorseful for doing however I think crimes commited by law enforcement agents and the Secret Service have largely remained undiscovered.

edit on 30-3-2015 by Tindalos2013 because: spelling correction

edit on 3/31/2015 by semperfortis because: Exact Headline




posted on Mar, 30 2015 @ 10:20 PM
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a reply to: Tindalos2013



I think crimes commited by law enforcement agents and the Secret Service have largely remained undiscovered.


Of course, the old boy network, back up your buddy


Also had a thought earlier, the war on drugs (which a lot of people, myself included, think is a lie) really just puts cops in a position of temptation. I mean, from street level up, they bust a dealer with tons of cash, they're on a crap wage and get the opportunity, what you going to do?

Good to see even the Feds getting into Bitcoin though, albeit criminally haha



posted on Mar, 30 2015 @ 10:32 PM
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Nice, I wonder if these guys hang out with the DEA/cartel hooker, coke party guys?

Absolute power corrupts absolutely.



posted on Mar, 30 2015 @ 10:51 PM
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Or he joined in that operation figuring he can score big with BTC, heh. Unfortunately seems like these operations attract those who are very willing to cash in on this stuff despite it not being legal for them even. Am sure there's many more where that came from.



posted on Mar, 30 2015 @ 10:52 PM
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originally posted by: Zcustosmorum
a reply to: Tindalos2013



I think crimes commited by law enforcement agents and the Secret Service have largely remained undiscovered.


Of course, the old boy network, back up your buddy



lol, exactly. They have all the empathy in the world when one of there own are stealing large sums of illicit funds. But where's the empathy when some dudes being pulled from his car at gun point and having his face dug into the concrete, just because some power tripping psycho copper thinks he smells a little erb?

The human condition, I guess.



posted on Mar, 30 2015 @ 11:57 PM
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originally posted by: Zcustosmorum
a reply to: Tindalos2013



I think crimes commited by law enforcement agents and the Secret Service have largely remained undiscovered.


Of course, the old boy network, back up your buddy


Also had a thought earlier, the war on drugs (which a lot of people, myself included, think is a lie) really just puts cops in a position of temptation. I mean, from street level up, they bust a dealer with tons of cash, they're on a crap wage and get the opportunity, what you going to do?

Good to see even the Feds getting into Bitcoin though, albeit criminally haha


I think the war in drugs was just a way to make more money for the state, cops will sir at the entrance of an apartment complex and watch people who don't fit the area come in and leave in 5 minutes then pull them over and get a bust, and sit there and do it as many times in a day as they can , just to get more busts. If they wanted to stop the drugs being sold they would just go to the place that all these people just got their drugs from but that means less charges and less money for the state. ..



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 12:15 AM
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Yeah sometimes there are jackasses that take advantage of their position. Like doctors writing bogus scripts for cash, or teachers molesting students, or cashiers pocketing cash from the till.

It's newsworthy, but it's not indicative of anything more than human nature, though ATS is going to have a circlejerk over this story.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 01:31 AM
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a reply to: Tindalos2013


Mr. Bridges, meanwhile, who was described as a computer forensics expert, diverted to a personal account more than $800,000 in digital currency that he gained control of during the Silk Road investigation, the authorities said.

Lol $800K?!? How in the world did that moron expect such a huge amount to go unnoticed. They may have got away with it if they weren't so greedy.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 01:31 AM
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double post
edit on 31/3/2015 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 07:25 AM
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Well as the old saying goes..

Hustla's gonna Hustle.

I ain't surprised



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 08:55 PM
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originally posted by: ChaoticOrder
a reply to: Tindalos2013


Mr. Bridges, meanwhile, who was described as a computer forensics expert, diverted to a personal account more than $800,000 in digital currency that he gained control of during the Silk Road investigation, the authorities said.

Lol $800K?!? How in the world did that moron expect such a huge amount to go unnoticed. They may have got away with it if they weren't so greedy.


Mr. Bridges, who was described as a computer forensics expert, must be the worst "expert" in the world. It would have been very easy to move those Bitcoins into a wallet without being tracked... so how did this screw-up of a Secret Service agent screw-up so badly?

I encourage everyone with interest in the overall story to actually read the complaint. It's astonishing.

Link to complaint: www.justice.gov...

It appears that these two Federal agents were doing far, far more than just grabbing some excess bitcoins that were lying around and they figured nobody would miss. It reads more like a purposeful organized crime effort, involving setting up dummy shell companies, forging letters from the government, being involved in pitching investments in shady offshore bitcoin startups, etc.

In fact, though they don't elaborate much, there is a very clear implication that these agents may have been responsible for theft of Bitcoin not only from Silk Road, but from Mt Gox as well. The complaint outlines how they transferred millions of dollars from Mt Gox, and then turned around and themselves signed Federal warrants seizing the assets of Mt Gox.
Reading this is thoroughly jaw-dropping, the kind of thing you'd associate with the government of a third-world country.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 09:30 PM
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originally posted by: Zcustosmorum
a reply to: Tindalos2013



I think crimes commited by law enforcement agents and the Secret Service have largely remained undiscovered.


Of course, the old boy network, back up your buddy


Also had a thought earlier, the war on drugs (which a lot of people, myself included, think is a lie) really just puts cops in a position of temptation. I mean, from street level up, they bust a dealer with tons of cash, they're on a crap wage and get the opportunity, what you going to do?


Not to mention the fact that if you're busted on drug charges, they can legally seize your money and possessions. The people who claim to support limiting government power, and simultaneously support the war on drugs, are incredible hypocrites.
edit on 31-3-2015 by TheJourney because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 10:33 PM
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originally posted by: Domo1
Yeah sometimes there are jackasses that take advantage of their position. Like doctors writing bogus scripts for cash, or teachers molesting students, or cashiers pocketing cash from the till.

It's newsworthy, but it's not indicative of anything more than human nature, though ATS is going to have a circlejerk over this story.


Seriously, that's your entire argument?

Doctors a drug dealers and some teachers mess with kids, so why bother getting bent out of shape when the authorities are shown to be corrupt power trippers who think (and usually can) they can get away with murder.

Surely you can come up with a better argument to defend this 'above the law institution' than that?



posted on Apr, 3 2015 @ 09:05 PM
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a reply to: Tindalos2013

This story sort of reminds me of the overall premise of the movie 'Blackhat' which I just saw last night at a drive-in theater. The Dark Web is full of all kinds of shady activity. I think it is kept in tact, more or less, because a large variety of underground criminal elements do use it, and sometimes it probably does cross over to higher levels.

I still need to understand how BitCoins really work - and whether or not this will be a feasible alternative in the future.



posted on Apr, 10 2015 @ 01:26 PM
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originally posted by: corsair00
a reply to: Tindalos2013

I still need to understand how BitCoins really work
- and whether or not this will be a feasible alternative in the future.


Everyone thinks bitcoin is the currency of criminals.
That is the primary factor prohibiting bitcoin from mass adoption.

Jamie Dimon, chairman and president of JP Morgan Chase, says his
bank can learn from disruptive payment systems like bitcoin.

Not sure if Jamie Dimon is the best endorsement for bitcoin,
'cause most people I know consider him a criminal.

Nevertheless, the blockchain is here to stay. I think of it like
MS Windows vs Linux - one is used by business (who pay for it),
while the other is open source (not profit driven).

Like Linux, bitcoin will never go away...
...nor will it ever disrupt JP Morgan Chase.



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