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Amazon Forest Losing its Ability to Absorb Carbon

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posted on Mar, 29 2015 @ 07:46 PM
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Hello ATS, I thought i'd wrap up my weekend with some good ol fashioned "Doom Porn." British researchers conducted a 30yr study of the Amazon forest and concluded that the uptake of Carbon by the forest is now half of what it was in the 90's. They are saying that the reason is because of accelerated metabolism in the trees so they are living fast and dying young.



In a study spanning 30 years and covering 189,000 trees distributed across 321 plots in the Amazon basin, researchers led by a group at the University of Leeds, in Britain, reported that the uptake of carbon dioxide in the Amazon peaked in the 1990s, at about 2 billion tons a year, and has since fallen by half.

The main factor seems to be that the initial acceleration of growth sped up the metabolism of the trees. The trees lived faster and died younger.


Now my question is: What's causing the metabolism of the trees in the Amazon to accelerate? I don't know...A toxic spill? What says ATS?

www.dispatch.com...




posted on Mar, 29 2015 @ 07:49 PM
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i cant answer your question
but we should feel lucky there is any rain forest left at all!
its been seriously depleted.

any connection?

edit on 29-3-2015 by autopat51 because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-3-2015 by autopat51 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2015 @ 07:51 PM
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originally posted by: lostbook
Hello ATS, I thought i'd wrap up my weekend with some good ol fashioned "Doom Porn." British researchers conducted a 30yr study of the Amazon forest and concluded that the uptake of Carbon by the forest is now half of what it was in the 90's. They are saying that the reason is because of accelerated metabolism in the trees so they are living fast and dying young.



In a study spanning 30 years and covering 189,000 trees distributed across 321 plots in the Amazon basin, researchers led by a group at the University of Leeds, in Britain, reported that the uptake of carbon dioxide in the Amazon peaked in the 1990s, at about 2 billion tons a year, and has since fallen by half.

The main factor seems to be that the initial acceleration of growth sped up the metabolism of the trees. The trees lived faster and died younger.


Now my question is: What's causing the metabolism of the trees in the Amazon to accelerate? I don't know...A toxic spill? What says ATS?

www.dispatch.com...


Perhaps the higher temperatures allow water to flow through the trees faster? Thus bringing in minerals faster. Or maybe the mining operations that cut down trees have improved air circulation as well as led to landslides and increased amounts of minerals in the water table?



posted on Mar, 29 2015 @ 07:52 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

I would have thought it was because of the massive amount of trees being cut down.
A higher metabolism reducing carbon uptake seems strange. I thought that would mean more carbon in.



posted on Mar, 29 2015 @ 08:07 PM
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originally posted by: ZeussusZ
a reply to: lostbook

I would have thought it was because of the massive amount of trees being cut down.
A higher metabolism reducing carbon uptake seems strange. I thought that would mean more carbon in.


Yes, I would have expected the deforestation to be at least related.

Any "accelerated growth" would be anomalous and worthy of a study of its own frankly. I agree that it should produce accelerated sequestration.

Perhaps more importantly, I don't see how it could be possible to actually measure how much carbon is being sequestered from the atmosphere into the Amazon rain forest.
edit on 29-3-2015 by greencmp because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2015 @ 09:39 PM
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originally posted by: greencmp

originally posted by: ZeussusZ
a reply to: lostbook

Perhaps more importantly, I don't see how it could be possible to actually measure how much carbon is being sequestered from the atmosphere into the Amazon rain forest.


Now there is an excellent point. Any "measurement" must be an approximation or calculated guess based on the present mass of trees, number of leaves, type of trees, number of trees, etc. so unless they counted all the trees and types of trees, they really can't come up with even an approximate number. They could be out by 95%. Of course this plays nicely into the global warming scam because even though they can't prove their numbers, nobody else can prove the real numbers.

Pretty slick and sneaky...

Cheers - Dave



posted on Mar, 29 2015 @ 09:57 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

These jackass so called scientists apply for government funds to conduct studies that have to be justified by asinine reports that any fool should already have the answer to. What is next on their agenda, studying the mating habits of Amazon Tree Frogs? Oh wait, that has already been done so maybe they can study why lesbians have a propensity to be fat. No, that study has already been done too.

Well SHEIT, they will come up with some asinine excuse to apply for more government grants.



posted on Mar, 30 2015 @ 08:54 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

We're killing the forest brain. And the trees know what's happening.


Like the neurons in our own brains, trees send messages via their roots. So when you walk into a forest, it's likely that all the trees are networked with each other, including other species of tree, as far as you can see.
In fact, she says that trees aren't only communicating, but are also sending resources back and forth to help out other trees — even if they are a different kind of tree.








edit on 30/3/15 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 30 2015 @ 08:59 AM
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could it be the canopy is not as thick as it was and letting more sunlight in and the trees and plants are growing faster.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 05:52 PM
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originally posted by: soficrow
a reply to: lostbook

We're killing the forest brain. And the trees know what's happening.


Like the neurons in our own brains, trees send messages via their roots. So when you walk into a forest, it's likely that all the trees are networked with each other, including other species of tree, as far as you can see.
In fact, she says that trees aren't only communicating, but are also sending resources back and forth to help out other trees — even if they are a different kind of tree.









Wow! I didn't know that. Thanks!



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