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Does Your Dog Pull You on Walks?

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posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 11:35 AM
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I just came back from a walk with my avatar dog and my other big dog using only one 15-foot leash, one end slip-knotted around each neck and the center laying across my shoulders. No collars. I barely had to touch the leash! It's AMAZING! I can't believe, after all these years (he's 8), I finally learned the simple tips that gave me freedom from frustration and constant pulling on the walk!

I have spent many years (and quite a few dollars) trying to get my 80-pound dog to walk by my side! I've tried head halters, choke chains, prong collars, E-Z-Walk body harness, and a regular collar and leash. Not to mention turning and walking in the opposite direction, stopping, backpacks, carrying food, favorite toys, etc... NOTHING worked. Until now.

It took some time for them (and me) to get used to the routine, so the first few times, it took us 15 minutes just to get out the door, but today, it took about one minute. If you have more than one dog, work with them individually for a few walks. It also took some time for them to learn the rules for the walk, but after approx. 5 walks with this method, they're my dream team! I hope this works for you!

The steps are:

1. Make sure your dog is in a relaxed state BEFORE putting the leash on. That means no jumping, no whining, no running around. I make him sit on his bed and I stand there with the leash in my hands (CALMLY) until he settles down.
2. Once the leash is on, he has to stay by my side or behind me while I walk to the door. If he runs ahead, I stop and stand there, make him get behind me and calm down. Make sure to breathe and keep yourself calm. (That's the hardest but most important part.)
3. Once you get to the door, tell him to stay and open the door. Just a crack at first, so you can correct any darting, but eventually, you want the door wide open with him sitting in the house, loose leash.
4. YOU step out the door, but make him stay inside. Stand for a second, looking at the scenery. Then gently tug on the leash to invite him out. (no voice)
5. Get him in position (at your side, or one on each side, or side by side for two dogs) and wait for him to adjust and be calm. Then walk. Don't say anything, don't look at him, just walk. Keep the leash SHORT AND LOOSE.
6. If he gets just a little ahead of you, walks away from you or starts sniffing the ground, give a leash correction (below) and make sure he complies before you continue the walk.

At all times, the leash should be short and loose, unless you're giving a quick correction. Concentrate on staying calm and walking with purpose.

Leash correction: Don't use the dog's name. Say "ah-ah!" or "tch!" with a quick, light tug on the leash. Don't prolong the tug. Make it as quick as possible. Return to loose leash. If he continues, make the next correction a little more intense. Keep your cool.

If he's jumping, pulling, or otherwise behaving badly on the walk, it's probably because he wasn't fully calm when you left the house or else YOU'RE not remaining calm. So, go home and try again later in the day or the next day.

If you have any questions or issues about this, post here and I'll try to help. I thought I'd NEVER have a nice walk with Jaia on leash, but I look forward to it now.

Have a nice walk!


.
edit on 3/27/2015 by Benevolent Heretic because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 11:41 AM
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I let both of my little mini rat terriers try to pull me when we go walking. It doesn't bother me, and they still obey me any other time.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 11:46 AM
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Does Your Dog Pull You on Walks?

No. Just the opposite. I catch myself pulling the dog along.
I have to slow down and keep in mind that Daisy is 11 and
gimpy and slow.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 11:46 AM
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a reply to: Bovah2

Yeah, that's a bit different than having 140+ lbs pulling on you. I still have a scar on my arm from when they went two ways around a tree and I smacked into it!

If you're happy with your walk, that's great.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 11:48 AM
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a reply to: FlyersFan

It's the same with my third dog, Cara. She can barely keep up with me on walks. She gets a separate walk from the Shepherds.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 11:49 AM
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Our dog leash represents fun to our dog. Whenever she sees it, it means beach time! I usually just have to have it in my hands and she'll heel very well.

I'd love to take training credit for it but I have no idea what I did.

I think she's just a smart dog.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 11:54 AM
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The German Shepherd female that I had when I was a teenager would heel without a leash. So, no, she didn't pull on a leash. I trained her to heel at around 4 months of age. She responded to both voice and hand commands.
She was incredibly intelligent. She loved to play. She played hide and seek, going to hide in her doghouse while the kids would hide, then coming to find them when called to 'seek'.
I miss her still.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 11:56 AM
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I've got the pulling issue with one dog- of course it has to be the 85lb one! He's better than he was when he came here, 6 months ago...but he's still like he's got ADD, or something. I can not get his attention off (what's across the street, what's in that house, who's in that car, who is that person, erggggggg that bike....... OMG SQUIRREL) random crap and on the road ahead.

I absolutely can not use something around his neck while he refuses to walk like a decent buddy- before he came to me, he was a victim of strangulation and has issues. So I use the Gentle Lead or a home made slip lead fashioned into a halter.

I've been doing what you're doing for the past couple months...with slow success. I think his issues are as follows:

A) He's afraid and anxious of everything because I think his original owners kept him locked up all the time (he had zero muscle tone or social skills when he came here)

B) He is ridiculously intelligent and people have tried to suppress it (possibly with physical reactions :S)



The culprit inmy story is the big grey guy with the quizzical look on his face. He's my Gussy boy. The happy black girl is Sara.

I just wanted to throw the ideas I have about his pulling issues, because maybe some one elses' dog might have a similar issue. One of the things that helps on our walks is bringing his current favorite stick (which we hold together and walk like champs). When he gets especially antsy, we just stop, sit and check out the scenery for a while, then move on, calmly.

Almost no talking, or only whispering (humans noises are so pointy some times!).



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: Hushabye

That's one thing we do with our dog. We never speak loudly. Dogs have great hearing, why shout? Just normal conversational tones seems to work well with us.

Though we now know when she doesn't want to listen.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 12:08 PM
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originally posted by: Hushabye
A) He's afraid and anxious of everything


Have you tried walking him on leash inside the house? Usually, when they respond to distractions, it's a good idea to take them someplace without distractions (in the house, then in the back yard, then in the country) and get the behavior down before exposing him to more "excitement" (things to be anxious and afraid of).

He is adorable!


(humans noises are so pointy some times!).


I hear that. Dogs communicate first with scent, then with sight, and lastly with sound. Just the opposite from us.
edit on 3/27/2015 by Benevolent Heretic because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 12:16 PM
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originally posted by: Benevolent Heretic
a reply to: Bovah2

Yeah, that's a bit different than having 140+ lbs pulling on you. I still have a scar on my arm from when they went two ways around a tree and I smacked into it!

If you're happy with your walk, that's great.


It would be cool if they walked by my side, but my little rascals are almost 12 years old, so those grumpy old ladies do what they want lol. They don't try to take off running when we walk, but they like to stay a few steps ahead sniffing all over the ground.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 12:18 PM
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I have no problems with the 80+ bulldog. Once the leash and collar are on, he is amazing.
Now, the 48 lb. Boxer Girl? Has an absolute freak out, when the leash is on. I have no idea where this can from, but she absolutely hates it.

I 've got a lot of work to do with her.

But I will give these tips a try with her. Something has to work.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 12:19 PM
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One of my dogs is a husky/lab mix. The husky is very prominent in her. You wouldn't even know she was part lab, unless you saw how the tips of her ears are rounded. Well, she likes to pull. I had the leash hooked to her collar but she dragged me everywhere. I got her a harness and that took care of most of the problem. She'd always wait patiently while I got it on her. The only trouble I had was during winter time when it was icy. She got excited and loved to romp and run and here I am sliding behind her because there was no traction so I could stop her. Then her baby came along. She's part Australian cattle dog and her herding instinct kicked in, so she's trying to herd her mom. I got her used to walking on a leash.
Now, I live in the country and they pretty much run loose. I haven't had them on a leash in a couple of years.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 12:24 PM
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a reply to: Benevolent Heretic

Why did it take you 8 years to figure this out?
Our demeanor influences how they act/react. Calm master = calm dog.


He's 110lbs and still growing. If I waited that long, there'd be real trouble - for him and me. There are lot's of dogs and lots of children in my neighborhood. Keeping him under control and acting like a gentleman was paramount, knowing how large and powerful he would get.

Well glad you finally got it and the walks are more enjoyable




.....................................



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 12:30 PM
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a reply to: Benevolent Heretic

What I have done with several dogs that works pretty well is the following:

I mark the pace. When he tugs, I stop and give him a gentle tug back. When he sits, I walk. I try to not keep tension on the leash. If he tightens it, I again tug back and stop. Eventually he notices that I am the one deciding where we go and how fast to walk.

Also, when he sees another dog or something that gets him nervous, I stop and tug again as well as apply a verbal trigger for "stop what ever the hell you are doing". I do a sharp "SHHHHHT" sound. My dogs are basically programmed to stop all behavior and look at me for the reason for the offence.

When crossing the street I always say "lets go". or "go". That is the only time I allow him to go to my other side. I insist they walk on the inside of the sidewalk away from the road. If they try to cross over I stop and tug. Its not a good idea to keep switching hands. He should know to walk on the same side of you always unless you tell him different.

In the end, your dog will enjoy walks since the stress level goes way down.

So, no tension on the leash. He doesnt mark pace or direction. And no changing sides unless you let him.

You can allow him to stop and smell things. Thats ok, but you shouldnt have to indulge him too much. Just every now and again so he enjoys the walk too.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 12:34 PM
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originally posted by: Bovah2
It would be cool if they walked by my side, but my little rascals are almost 12 years old, so those grumpy old ladies do what they want lol. They don't try to take off running when we walk, but they like to stay a few steps ahead sniffing all over the ground.


You could teach them to heel (you CAN teach an old dog new tricks), but I'm like you. My old girl doesn't have much more time with us, so I kind of let her do what she wants. She's very good, though.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 12:35 PM
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originally posted by: chiefsmom
But I will give these tips a try with her. Something has to work.


Good luck! Let me know how it goes!



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 12:37 PM
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a reply to: Skid Mark

Yeah, we live in the country, too and they run off-leash all the time, but I wanted to teach Jaia to behave on the leash for those times when I did walk him - at the vet, downtown and stuff like that. I just like working with them and making them more and more balanced.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 12:50 PM
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a reply to: Benevolent Heretic

I have a black and white cocker spaniel that I walk twice a day. I got him one of those extender leashes which lets him roam around a bit without getting the leash tangled in his legs. He's been trained not to dart into the street, though after a certain point on the walk I always lock the leash with a short leash.

For the most part when I walk he is fine. The thing is he likes to chase birds and rabbits whenever he sees them. He's not a huge dog but he isn't a small dog either so when he darts he has a tendency to rip on my shoulder. For the most part though, the key to settling my dog down is to just keep walking until he tires out.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 01:30 PM
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a reply to: Benevolent Heretic

My dog...all 15lbs of the little guy...walks ME. I come home outta breath...a better word to use is prob. "pulling the owner" and not "walking the dog".



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