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Pesticide Lobbyist Refuses To Drink Glyphosate After Claiming It’s Safe To Drink

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posted on Mar, 28 2015 @ 09:31 AM
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a reply to: leeb317
If you read the directions.
It's 4 OZ Per Gallon.
I have used it and I do read directions.
Some farmers double the dose.
So that's 8 OZ per gallon.

Not at all a good idea.




posted on Mar, 28 2015 @ 10:23 AM
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a reply to: WeRpeons

As an Environmental scientist I find it disgusting that these people can say this stuff about the "safety" of these products. It is a problem to feed the large number people on Earth and we need to balance this out so we don't kill the goose that laid the golden egg for short term gains. I want to be able to eat clean foods and have clean water. If we poison the earth we risk the future of our own survival. I have learned how to plant a small garden in the same plot and I raise a small flock of chickens too. Don't need much land for this if you can replenish the soil with chicken poop, egg shells and composted vegetable scraps. All of this is "organic" and helps me be self sufficient too. My next goal is to get Solar panel energy if my wife will allow it.Those chickens are making her mad if they come in the garage (close the door i say).



posted on Mar, 28 2015 @ 12:03 PM
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He should have said, "I'm a liar, not an idiot".



posted on Mar, 28 2015 @ 12:36 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
a reply to: dragonridr

Actually, there are no regulations governing roundup. There are recommendations but that is it. A set of instructions on the can



The product efficacy and labeling is actually regulated by the EPA (and OSHA in the case of the MSDS), the labeling, instructions, and warning labels can be quite specific under FIFRA, the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act.

Its use is regulated again by the EPA and OSHA. In addition, for certain FIFRA regulated products, either federal or State training and licensing requirements apply to commercial applicators
edit on 28-3-2015 by LanceCorvette because: Add second paragraph


Here is just an FYI for anyone who is interested: EPA FIFRA website
edit on 28-3-2015 by LanceCorvette because: add link



posted on Mar, 28 2015 @ 02:39 PM
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a reply to: LanceCorvette

But you can buy roundup over the counter with no license. You do not need training to use it. A small farmer can use it and there is no actual testing of the raw produce to verify anything. OSHA only deals with workers exposure.

The wording on the label is regulated, but not the product application itself most times. There are no records usually required and if there are, they could be fudged. There is no information on the link concerning allowable residues, just the regulations as to how they are regulated with little to no specifics. Like I said, there is no mandatory testing of every crop by the ones buying the product so the farmer can put more than the recommended amount if they need to. Not all farmers are going to do that. I knew bigger farmers and I know some put a lot of chemicals on their fields to make sure they had crops. A hundred acres is not real big though. The strange part is that they have the numbers so high, the farmer can put a lot more of the products on the fields than they need to. If the stuff wasn't so expensive they probably would.

My dad was a farmer, so I kind of had friends that owned farms. Birds of a feather flock together.


edit on 28-3-2015 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2015 @ 04:22 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse


"But you can buy roundup over the counter with no license. You do not need training to use it. A small farmer can use it and there is no actual testing of the raw produce to verify anything. OSHA only deals with workers exposure. The wording on the label is regulated, but not the product application itself most times. "


I think your statement is mostly correct. Where I disagree is that OSHA regulates use of hazardous substances, e.g., safety precautions and training, it mandates the existence and contents of the MSDS. If the directions and OSHA regs are followed, then exposure is limited to some threshold that someone, the EPA IIRC, has determined to be safe.


but not the product application itself most times. There are no records usually required and if there are, they could be fudged. There is no information on the link concerning allowable residues, just the regulations as to how they are regulated with little to no specifics. Like I said, there is no mandatory testing of every crop by the ones buying the product so the farmer can put more than the recommended amount if they need to.


I think this is correct also. One must, at some point, rely on one's fellow man to do the right thing.


Like I said, there is no mandatory testing of every crop by the ones buying the product


The statement I was responding to was, "Actually, there are no regulations governing roundup" which I am merely pointing out is not accurate, for someone reading this thread and digesting the information.


My dad was a farmer, so I kind of had friends that owned farms. Birds of a feather flock together.


I was a lawyer who represented pesticide and chemical companies, so I've been pretty deep into the regulations also. They're a mess, they're overly complicated, but they paid my bills for a time.
edit on 28-3-2015 by LanceCorvette because: edit



posted on Mar, 30 2015 @ 11:40 AM
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I think some people are missing the point. This guy brought it up. He said, "You can drink a whole quart of it and it won't hurt you."

No one forced him to make this absurd claim.

It is totally fair for the interviewer to challenge him on this point, and for all of those who are saying, "I wouldn't drink something a stranger gave me in a glass either," OK! Let's go down to the lab and have this guy verify himself a nice big quart of Glyphosates, then drink it all down. Do you think he'd take that offer either? No way!

We all know better. As others have pointed out, you can't drink something like this and not expect your body to have a reaction. The doc should have just used the party line: "Exposure is safe in small quantities when handled properly."

Instead, he runs his mouth and says something stupid. "You can drink a whole quart of it..." What an idiot. He deserved to be challenged and exposed. Ridiculous.



posted on Mar, 30 2015 @ 05:43 PM
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a reply to: Justoneman



It is a problem to feed the large number people on Earth and we need to balance this out so we don't kill the goose that laid the golden egg for short term gains.

Actually there is no problem feeding the large number of people on Earth, and I believe that it is all for Long term gains so that the shareholders can do as they wish with all their millions.

Whatever it takes they will say it just as long as the money rolls in. I totally agree with the rest of your post.
S&F for the thread and Star for Justoneman

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Apr, 2 2015 @ 09:43 PM
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Great video, thanks for the post! (This is the one that turned me from lurker to member... S&F for you!!)

I have been researching glyphosate a bit myself lately. Doing all I can to clean up my diet and put more effort into getting the things I need prioritized over the things I want.

Haven't figured out if either side has the complete right of it, but thats not really the point in my mind anyway. I am pretty sure (sarcasm!) there is no dietary requirement for glyphosate, so trying to exclude it on that basis alone.




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