It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Breaking: Germanwings Pilot Was Locked Out of Cockpit Before Crash in France

page: 2
63
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 07:42 PM
link   
Zaphod, could there have been some fault with the ILS/MLS system that would cause the plane to mistakenly "Autoland"? Combine that with an unresponsive copilot?




posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 07:52 PM
link   

originally posted by: masqua
Why aren't the pilots in possession of a key to unlock the door should they need to?

Is there even a way to unlock it from outside?


This kind of defeats the purpose of protecting the cockpit, if a terrorist knows someone else has a key they just start killing people until they find it and get in.


+6 more 
posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 07:54 PM
link   
a reply to: Rocker2013

If that's the case, then the 'protection of that cockpit' just killed 150 people.



posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 07:56 PM
link   
a reply to: shaneslaughta




Since 9/11 its been standard to lock cockpits doors. Something must have happened to the copilot after the one went to the pisser. Heart attack, stroke, suicide...who knows.


That's exactly what I was thinking. If they can't hear an exchange of voices between both pilots, maybe the co-pilot did succumb to a heart attack or stroke. If it was a suicide, I would think the descent would have probably been more rapid.



posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 07:57 PM
link   
a reply to: CovertAgenda
Ok on reflection, maybe not 'ineffectual'... given the rate of occurrence v.s hours flown or similar, the risks may have been assessed as 'negligible'. Just another numbers game.
How long will it be until we realise we need to incorporate Brownian motion analogues into the computational side of risk management?? (via a nice hot cup of tea)



posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 07:58 PM
link   

originally posted by: masqua
a reply to: Rocker2013

If that's the case, then the 'protection of that cockpit' just killed 150 people.



If that's true then it's ludicrous, if the pilots didn't have keys, would there not have been some kind of security key pad outside the cockpit door?
edit on -180002015-03-25T19:58:28-05:00u2831201528032015Wed, 25 Mar 2015 19:58:28 -0500 by Zcustosmorum because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 07:59 PM
link   
So, the copilot slips the pilot 40mg of Lasix in the lounge, they level out, the pilot goes to pee like a racehorse, *click* the copilot locks the door and flies it into the ground, singing happy songs all the way, as the pilot claws at the door.



posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 08:01 PM
link   
I would have thought it would be SOP for a steward to enter the cockpit if one of the pilots needs a break/the bathroom. I think I've seen it reported before that it's a legal requirement that there always be two people in the cockpit at all times.

I'm not sure I'm following the train of thought that this all indicates something nefarious. In my opinion it doesn't, it only shows a complete lack of following basic SOP and not having a second person in there.

There's reportedly no sound from the second pilot, even though the locked out pilot can be heard trying to break in. So, it seems to me, the pilot went to the bathroom, a second person didn't do their job and take his place in the cockpit for security before the copilot locked the door (ironically for security). Then something happened to the copilot rendering them incapable and they couldn't get back in.

Unless there's evidence of someone forcing their way into the cockpit and locking the door, this sounds to me as though it's a MASSIVE failure in procedure, leading to the deaths of more than 100 people.

If there is no sound of anyone getting in, no sound of the copilot being attacked/killed, no reports of any disturbances etc, it sounds as though this crew just f-ed up in the worst possible way.



posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 08:02 PM
link   

originally posted by: masqua
a reply to: Rocker2013

If that's the case, then the 'protection of that cockpit' just killed 150 people.



No, the failure of the crew to do their jobs just cost 150 lives, if this scenario played out without any terrorists causing it.



posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 08:03 PM
link   
Well, they have not really said much about the other co pilot, so I wonder, maybe they both left the cockpit even though they are not supposed to and the door locked....

Just a thought.



posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 08:04 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Thanks! I figured as much but just wanted to hear it from people actually having proper experience in avionics


edit on 25-3-2015 by TheGreazel because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 08:06 PM
link   
a reply to: WeRpeons

So the co pilot locked the door behind the pilot as he left, has an issue that incapacitates him and somehow the plane goes into a shallow dive while on auto pilot? If it took 8-10 minutes to drop to 6800 feet it would have been less noticeable. What do we know about the co pilot? I haven't heard much about the pilots at all.


V



posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 08:09 PM
link   
I think we can be sure that the person in the cockpit wasn't too busy with an emergency to leave the controls to open the door as he could still have called out to the other pilot to at least let him know what was happening.



posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 08:11 PM
link   
a reply to: biggilo

Why? If he's locked out what's he going to do?



posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 08:14 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

What is your take on all of this provided the current information (which isnt much at all i know)? What do you think happened and how?



posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 08:16 PM
link   
Watching CNN and some really good info on the lock.

They have to find out the protocol, but a former Pilot explained the lock can be in 3 positions.

Unlock
Normal
Lock

When it's in Normal position, the Pilot has a code to reenter the cockpit. When it's locked he has to knock.

The question they will be looking for is does the data recorder record the position of the lock and when it was changed and what's the protocol? When a Pilot leaves do they just pull it to normal where they need a code to get back in? I'm sure they will eventually find this out.



posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 08:20 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: biggilo

Why? If he's locked out what's he going to do?


it might stop him trying to smash the door down - keep the passengers calm if nothing else
edit on 25-3-2015 by aynock because: filled out



posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 08:23 PM
link   
a reply to: neoholographic

OK, these plane crashes along with this one and what transpired makes me think the Omen or something right out of the Twilight Zone. Flight MH370 just veers off course and flies on, uninterrupted over the ocean until it vanishes into the water out of fuel. Then here, the copilot suddenly goes into a trance and flies right into a mountain while the chief pilot tries to smash the door down?



posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 08:24 PM
link   
a reply to: aynock

Or make him try twice as hard to get in, so he can help him with whatever it is.



posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 08:24 PM
link   
i guess the cockpit door needs a biometric id lock or a special dongle or something like that issued only to the senior pilot.



new topics

top topics



 
63
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join