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Bank of America Is Under Attack By Hackers

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posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 07:34 AM
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Customers of bank of America are under attack. Hackers have created a website that mirrors Bank of America’s, and sends this fake website link to the various customers of bank of America through emails or social media accounts. Once the victim logs onto the malicious link, he is directed to a fake website which is controlled by hackers. When the victim logs onto the fake website, the victim will see following text on the website:

We need to verify your account information for your online banking to be re-activated and conceive the victim to click on the download button .when you click on the download button to receive your verification file, victim will be redirected to another website where victim will be filling up the form with their complete personal information such as online login details,email address and password,date of birth and other personal details.victim must also answer 3 security questions .

Here is the phishing link

74(.)208(.)43.206/html/E-Alert(.)html

Don’t worry, as the above phishing link has been blocked, but bank customers should be still cautious as hackers might be able to use other phishing links to target customers.

If you are victim of this scam, then contact your bank as soon as possible. Banks can block unauthorized transactions, then victims should change their password and email address and apply more layers of security by enabling a 2-step verification(if possible). Don’t think hackers only target bank of America, tomorrow they might target any other bank with the help of this phishing technique.

More about phishing:

You might be aware of phishing techniques. Through phishing techniques, hackers or phishers gain access to victim’s login credentials or other sensitive data. Phishing is the most well-known method of hacking into social media accounts and bank accounts. Banks are often been target of phishers. The information you filled in the phishing link’s form is directly passed to the hacker. Bank customers or users should always click on trusted links and don’t think that your anti-virus will identify every phishing link, nowadays hackers are clever enough to bypass even these securities.




posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 07:49 AM
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Great thanks for the heads up hopefully I haven't logged in an screw my self..



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:05 AM
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I get e mails like that all the time. If you pay attention to the way it's worded, you can see no professional wrote it. Full of errors and strange wording, it just screams Fake.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:21 AM
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originally posted by: DAVID64
I get e mails like that all the time. If you pay attention to the way it's worded, you can see no professional wrote it. Full of errors and strange wording, it just screams Fake.


Sadly 99% of the populace won't pay attention to details like that and click on it.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:24 AM
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a reply to: lucifuge

These aren't hackers. This is a common scam run by various groups who target multiple companies at the same time. Internet and phone companies, Microsoft etc.

It's actually very easy to do, a few hours in any website design programs can created something to fool you. The important thing to remember is that it's illegal for any company to request that kind of information via email. They must have you CONFIRM that information, never provide it to them for the purposes of billing etc.

I get a notice about twice a week from the various companies I deal with alerting me to a new email scam. The easiest way to determine if ti's legit is to hover over the link they've provided you, if you see that it redirects to somewhere completely un-affiliated with the actual company, then it's most likely identify theft.

~Tenth



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 12:56 PM
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a reply to: lucifuge

Thank you...I have a card with them....I tend to 1st look at the senders-sending link address before I'd open something like that.

*Example: I get spammed a lot from Yahoo, Google...whatever... telling me any number of things-mailbox full, detected a problem, re-sign up.....but the actual sending links are something like : joeshmoyoushmuck@ liarliarpantsonfire....so I just delete those.

Thanks a lot for the heads up for us!


edit on 24-3-2015 by mysterioustranger because: caught by the grammar police!



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 12:58 PM
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a reply to: tothetenthpower

So you mean that Algerian prince I sent 4000 dollars to in order to flee the country and give me 10 millions dollars was just pulling my leg?!

That kind of behavior is unbecoming of a prince!



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