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Airbus A320 crash in Southern France

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posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:02 AM
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a reply to: andy06shake

Sky News should stop commenting on aviation accidents then.

It's highly likely that the black box and CVR will be found and that investigators will be able to full understand this crash, so there's really no need to stream live information.




posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:03 AM
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originally posted by: kuhl
a reply to: Rocker2013

While no expert if a mayday sent I would agree mechanical failure if no mayday sent plane may have exploded can someone with more education on this tell me did the plane come down at a quicker descent rate than just loss of controls/power/engines


Im guessing explosion or structural decompression would have sent the plane down quicker, but it seems to have travelled around 70 miles from initial start of descent in very straight line very quickly. At this point I would like to give my heartfelt condolences to all on board and their familys



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:14 AM
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a reply to: justwanttofly

Agree, It is all conjecture for now, the true/truest picture will emerge.

Meantime, my thoughts go out to the poor families who are undoubtedly stunned by the sudden worst news ...

I really hope this is a simple malfunction ... we have had enough of the attention seeking soul-less ones !!




posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:17 AM
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Feels quite weird. I flew on D-AIPX last sunday.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:17 AM
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a reply to: justwanttofly

I mean stream live information from the plane to some form of ground control facility. There is an obvious need for this type of system regrading civil aviation, self evident really.

I don't particularly hold with Sky news reporting techniques myself but to ask them to stop commenting just not going to happen.


Lets just hope some of the poor souls managed to survive the impact considering the fuselage is apparently still intact and the rescue teams get to them in time.

edit on 24-3-2015 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:22 AM
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a reply to: andy06shake

Streaming live data will help with flights like MH370 where the recorders aren't found, or the few where they're damaged and don't have data. But both of those are extremely rare. In most crashes the recorders are recovered and the data downloaded.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:28 AM
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The pilots radioed a mayday, and dropped from 38,000 feet to 7,000 feet in nine minutes.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:31 AM
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This graphic from FlightRadar24 shows the speed and altitude for the A320 until it dropped off the radar after plunging 31,200ft in just ten minutes



Red Line = Speed
Blue Line = Altitude


edit on 24.3.2015 by flammadraco because: (no reason given)


Considering the plane was loosing altitude and not speed when it start descending surely means the plane did not stall?
edit on 24.3.2015 by flammadraco because: (no reason given)

edit on 24.3.2015 by flammadraco because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:31 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Any kind of technology that can help us understand how and why these disasters occur has got to be a good idea in my book.

If the fuselage is indeed still intact i imagine the black box will be recovered.

You know your stuff regarding all things aviation orientated Zaphod58, what do you think happened? Or is it to soon to speculate?
edit on 24-3-2015 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:32 AM
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We have no facts yet, but this might be a a possible cause.

www.pprune.org...

This have happend several times before witout media getting the hold of it, and might be the cause of at least one crash.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:36 AM
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a reply to: Ivar_Karlsen

After the incident from your link, Large aircraft use hot gases diverted from the engines to remove ice from flight-critical surfaces, meaning this kind of incident should not occur any more?

Source



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:40 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
The pilots radioed a mayday, and dropped from 38,000 feet to 7,000 feet in nine minutes.


Im hoping this is not another case of faulty/frozen pitot tubes causing the pilots to struggle with automated avionics taking control



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:41 AM
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Whoops, nemmind. I was thinking pitot tubes.
edit on 3/24/2015 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:42 AM
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a reply to: andy06shake

Pure speculation on my part, but a rapid descent like that after a mayday call, could be a sign of decompression. Although 7,000 feet is lower than they needed to go for a decompression descent.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:42 AM
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edit on 3/24/2015 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:42 AM
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originally posted by: flammadraco
a reply to: Ivar_Karlsen

After the incident from your link, Large aircraft use hot gases diverted from the engines to remove ice from flight-critical surfaces, meaning this kind of incident should not occur any more?

Source


The Angle Of Attack vanes are electrically heated.

How ever some vanes on series of Airbusses have design flaws that let water penetrate, and freeze them up.
That can lead to a nose dive where air data computers must be turned off to regain control.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:46 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
Whoops, nemmind. I was thinking pitot tubes.


An asian B320 had this problem last week, with updated vanes, so the problem have apparently not gone away.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:47 AM
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a reply to: Ivar_Karlsen

That's bad news. They've had years to come up with a fix for this, and I have a hard time believing that no aircraft between when they rolled the fix out, and now had the problem again, to show that their fix wasn't working.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:48 AM
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a reply to: Ivar_Karlsen

With so many planes using the same air space as this flight, why has it only happened to this flight? I'm sure that their were flights just before and after this flight in the same airspace and altitude, surely they would have experienced the same weather as this doomed flight!

That being said, I've just read that this particular plane was 21 years old.



posted on Mar, 24 2015 @ 08:48 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
Whoops, nemmind. I was thinking pitot tubes.


Just about same problem with AOA vanes.
How ever the computers think the aircraft is stalled and activates Alpha Floor, (nose dive)



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